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19 records – page 2 of 2.

Impact of Board Width on In-plane Shear Stiffness of Cross-Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2272
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Turesson, Jonas
Berg, Sven
Ekevad, Mats
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2019
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
In-Plane Shear Modulus
In-Plane Shear Stiffness
Finite Element Method
Board Width
Layer Thickness
Board Gap
Research Status
Complete
Series
Engineering Structures
Summary
Board width-to-thickness ratios in non-edge-glued cross laminated timber (CLT) panels influence the in-plane shear stiffness of the panel. The objective is to show the impact of board width-to-thickness ratios for 3- and 5-layer CLT panels. Shear stiffnesses were calculated using finite element analysis and are shown as reduction factors relative to the shear stiffnesses of edge-glued CLT panels. Board width-to-thickness ratios were independently varied for outer and inner layers. Results show that the reduction factor lies in the interval of 0.6 to 0.9 for most width-to-thickness ratios. Results show also that using boards with low width-to-thickness ratios give low reduction factors. The calculated result differed by 2.9% compared to existing experimental data.
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In-Plane Stiffness of CLT Panels With and Without Openings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1668
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Shahnewaz, Md
Tannert, Thomas
Alam, Shahria
Popovski, Marjan
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
In-Plane Loading
Finite Element Analysis
Elastic Stiffness
Openings
Thickness
Aspect Ratios
Analytical Model
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 3813-3820
Summary
The research presented in this paper analysed the stiffness of Cross-Laminated-Timber (CLT) panels under in-plane loading. Finite element analysis (FEA) of CLT walls was conducted. The wood lamellas were modelled as an orthotropic elastic material, while the glue-line between lamellas were modelled using non-linear contact elements. The FEA was verified with test results of CLT panels under in-plane loading and proved sufficiently accurate in predicting the elastic stiffness of the CLT panels. A parametric study was performed to evaluate the change in stiffness of CLT walls with and without openings. The variables for the parametric study were the wall thickness, the aspect ratios of the walls, the size and shape of the openings, and the aspect ratios of the openings. Based on the results, an analytical model was proposed to calculate the in-plane stiffness of CLT walls with openings more accurately than previously available models from the literature.
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Laminated Strand Lumber (LSL) Reinforced by GFRP; Mechanical and Physical Properties

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1311
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Material
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
Author
Moradpour, Payam
Pirayesh, Hamidreza
Gerami, Masood
Jouybari, Iman
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Journal Article
Material
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Keywords
GFRP
Poplar
Modulus of Rupture
Modulus of Elasticity
Shear Strength
Compression Strength
Impact Strength
Water Absorption
Thickness Swelling
Research Status
Complete
Series
Construction and Building Materials
Summary
The effect of glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) on the technical properties of LSL made from poplar (Populus deltoids L.) employing pMDI and UF as binders was investigated. Technical properties such as modulus of rupture (MOR), Modulus of elasticity (MOE), shear strength (SS), compression strength parallel to the grains (CS //), impact strength (IS), water absorption (WA) and thickness swelling (TS) were determined. Results confirmed that resin type and GFRP have significant effects on the LSL properties. It was revealed that the most beneficial effect of GFRP is on MOR, MOE, IS, SS and CS respectively. The Highest properties were obtained by using pMDI as the resin and GFRP as the reinforcement, where properties such as MOR, MOE, IS, SS and CS were improved by 123, 114, 100, 94, and 90%, respectively, compared to control samples. Furthermore, GFRP incorporation led to alteration of fracture place from tension side to compression side. Depending on the treatment type, the WA and TS values of the LVLs improved between 23% to 68% and 19.5% to 78%, respectively.
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Modelling the Effects of Wood Cambial Age on the Effective Modulus of Elasticity of Poplar Laminated Veneer Lumber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1417
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Author
Girardon, Stéphane
Denaud, Louis
Pot, Guillaume
Rahayu, Istie
Publisher
Springer Paris
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Journal Article
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Poplar
Modulus of Elasticity
Analytical Model
Bending
Thickness
Research Status
Complete
Series
Annals of Forest Science
Summary
A modelling method is proposed to highlight the effect of cambial age on the effective modulus of elasticity of laminated veneer lumber (LVL) according to bending direction and veneer thickness. This approach is relevant for industrial purposes in order to optimize the performance of LVL products. LVL is used increasingly in structural applications. It is obtained from a peeling process, where product’s properties depend on cambial age, hence depend on radial position in the log. This study aims to highlight how radial variations of properties and cambial age impact the mechanical behaviour of LVL panels. An analytical mechanical model has been designed to predict the modulus of elasticity of samples made from poplar LVL panels. The originality of the model resides in the integration of different data from the literature dealing with the variation in wood properties along the radius of the log. The simulation of the peeling process leads to veneers with different mechanical properties, which are randomly assembled in LVL panels. The model shows a correct mechanical behaviour prediction in comparison with experimental results of the literature, in particular with the decrease in MOE in LVL made of juvenile wood. It highlights that the bending direction and veneer thickness have no influence on the average MOE, but affect MOE dispersion. This paper proposed an adequate model to predict mechanical behaviour in the elastic domain of LVL panels based on the properties of raw wood material.
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Performance of Cross-Laminated Timber as a Residential Building Material Subject to Tornado Events

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2523
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Wind
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Author
Stoner, Michael
Organization
Clemson University
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Wind
Design and Systems
Keywords
Experimental Tests
Analytical Model
Debris Impact Testing
Thickness
Out Of Plane
Structural Performance
Tornado
Residential Buildings
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Innovations in the use of wood as a structural material have included the invention of engineered wood products including Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) for which markets are expanding. One such market is residential construction where many structures are built using light-frame construction techniques. These structures have shown vulnerabilities to hazards such as tornadoes; whereas, CLT has shown potential to withstand these hazards. The project had two main components: an experimental test phase and an analytical phase. Results from experimental debris impact testing demonstrated that 3-ply CLT could reliably resist the debris associated with EF-2 and EF-3 level events while failing approximately 50% of the time when subject to EF-5 level hazards. CLT shear wall tests on assemblies with and without out-of-plane walls sought to quantify the performance of configurations that would likely be present in residential structures with more box-like geometries and behavior. In addition, it was determined that out-of-plane walls could resist the uplift forces that develop due to lateral loads. A simplified analytical method for determining the capacity of CLT shear wall assemblies was proposed based on the connection capacities of the assembly. The analytical phase of the project included the development of a structural performance model for residential archetypes designed using CLT. Results from this study indicated that the archetypes experienced a 10% probability of failure in EF-4 events. In comparison, light-frame construction has shown vulnerabilities to EF-0 and EF-1 level events. In addition, the hazard assessment of light-frame structures based on historical tornado data showed that significant portions of the United States exhibited a reliability index less than the target reliability described in ASCE 7-16, dropping to nearly 0% when built using CLT. A comparative cost analysis shows that for locations with high tornado hazard, it would take up to 100 years for CLT construction to be economically competitive with light-frame construction considering only the differences in upfront construction costs and tornado-induced losses. Ultimately, CLT exhibits an increased level of performance compared to light-frame residential construction in tornado events. Further developments in the mass timber market could make such an alternative to light-frame construction more realistic.
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Performance of Cross-Laminated Timber Shear Walls for Platform Construction Under Lateral Loading

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1268
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Shahnewaz, Md
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Keywords
Lateral Loading
In-Plane Stiffness
Platform Buildings
Openings
Thickness
Aspect Ratios
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is gaining popularity in residential and non-residential applications in the North American construction market. CLT is very effective in resisting lateral forces resulting from wind and seismic loads. This research investigated the in-plane performance of CLT shear wall for platform-type buildings under lateral loading. Analytical models were proposed to estimate the in-plane stiffness of CLT wall panels with openings based on experimental and numerical investigations. The models estimate the in-plane stiffness under consideration of panel thickness, aspect ratios, and size and location of the openings. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to reduce the number of model parameters to those that have a significant impact on the stiffness reduction of CLT wall panels with openings. Finite element models of CLT wall connections were developed and calibrated against experimental tests. The results were incorporated into models of CLT single and coupled shear walls. Finite element analyses were conducted on CLT shear walls and the results in terms of peak displacements, peak loads and energy dissipation were in good agreement when compared against full-scale shear wall tests. A parametric study on single and coupled CLT shear walls was conducted with variation of number and type of connectors. The seismic performance of 56-single and 40-coupled CLT shear walls’ assembles for platform-type construction were evaluated. Deflection formulas were proposed for both single and coupled CLT shear walls loaded laterally in-plane that in addition to the contributions of CLT panels and connections, also account for the influence of adjacent perpendicular walls and floors above and illustrated with examples. Analytical equations were proposed to calculate the resistance of CLT shear walls accounting for the kinematic behaviour of the walls observed in experimental investigations (sliding, rocking and combined sliding-rocking) and illustrated with examples. Different configurations (number and location of hold-downs) of single and coupled CLT walls were considered. The findings presented in this thesis will contribute to the scientific body of knowledge and furthermore will be a useful tool for practitioners for the successful seismic design of CLT platform buildings in-line with the current CSA O86 provisions.
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Process Optimization of Large-Size Bamboo Bundle Laminated Veneer Lumber (BLVL) by Box-Behnken Design

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1807
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Other Materials
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Author
Niu, Xiaoyi
Pang, Jiuyin
Cai, Hanzhong
Li, Shan
Le, Lei
Wu, Junhua
Publisher
North Carolina State University
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Journal Article
Material
Other Materials
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Process Optimiazation
Box-Behnken Design
Lengthening Technology
Three-Factor
Lap-Joints
Board Density
Thickness
Optimum Pareto Solutions
Genetic Algorithma Method
Modulus of Rupture
Shearing Strength (SSI)
Elastic Modulus
Dimensional Stability
Bamboo
Research Status
Complete
Series
BioResources
Summary
This work focuses on optimization of the laminated lap-joint lengthening technology that is used to produce large-size bamboo bundle laminated veneer lumber (BLVL). A three-factor Box-Behnken design was developed in which lap-joint length (x1), board density (x2), and thickness of lap veneer (x3) were the three factors. Multi-objective optimization of response surface model was used to obtain 17 optimum Pareto solutions by a genetic algorithms method. The mechanical properties of BLVL predicted using the model had a strong correlation with the experimental values (R2 = 0.925 for the elastic modulus (MOE), R2 = 0.972 for the modulus of rupture (MOR), R2 = 0.973 for the shearing strength (SS)). The interaction of the x1 and x3 factors had a significant effect on MOE. The MOR and shearing SS were significantly influenced by the interaction of x2 and x3 factors. The optimum conditions for maximizing the mechanical properties of BLVL lap-joint lengthening process were established at x1 = 16.10 mm, x2 = 1.01 g/cm3, and x3 = 7.00 mm. A large-size of BLVL with a length of 14.1 m was produced with the above conditions. Strong mechanical properties and dimensional stability were observed.
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Systematic Experimental Investigation to Support the Development of Seismic Performance Factors for Cross Laminated Timber Shear Wall Systems

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1281
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Amini, Omar
van de Lindt, John
Rammer, Douglas
Pei, Shiling
Line, Philip
Popovski, Marjan
Organization
Forest Products Laboratory
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Quasi-Static
Cyclic Tests
Stiffness
Strength
Deformation
Aspect Ratios
Thickness
Joints
Research Status
Complete
Series
Engineering Structures
Summary
In the US, codified seismic design procedure requires the use of seismic performance factors which are currently not available for CLT shear wall systems. The study presented herein focuses on the determination of seismic design factors for CLT shear walls in platform type construction using the FEMA P-695 process. Results from the study will be proposed for implementation in the seismic design codes in the US. The project approach is outlined and selected results of full-scale shear wall testing are presented and discussed. Archetype development, which is required as part of the FEMA P-695 process, is briefly explained with an example. Quasi-static cyclic tests were conducted on CLT shear walls to systematically investigate the effects of various parameters. The key aspect of these tests is that they systematically investigate each potential modelling attribute that is judged within the FEMA P-695 uncertainty quantification process. Boundary constraints and gravity loading were both found to have a beneficial effect on the wall performance, i.e. higher strength and deformation capacity. Higher aspect ratio panels (4:1) demonstrated lower stiffness and substantially larger deformation capacity compared to moderate aspect ratio panels (2:1). However, based on the test results there is likely a lower bound for aspect ratio (at 2:1) where it ceases to benefit deformation capacity of the wall. This is due to the transition of the wall behaviour from rocking to sliding. Phenomenological models were used in modelling CLT shear walls. Archetype selection and analysis procedure was demonstrated and nonlinear time history analysis was conducted using different wall configurations.
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Thin Topping Timber-Concrete Composite Floors

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue902
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Skinner, Jonathan
Organization
University of Bath
Year of Publication
2014
Format
Thesis
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Stiffness
Vibration Response
Topping Thickness
Screws
shear connectors
Static Loads
Cyclic Loads
Short-term
Bending Tests
Research Status
Complete
Summary
A timber-concrete composite (TCC) combines timber and concrete, utilising the complementary properties of each material. The composite is designed in such a way that the timber resists combined tension and bending, whilst the concrete resists combined compression and bending. This construction technique can be used either in new build construction, or in refurbishment, for upgrading existing timber structures. Its use is most prolific in continental Europe, Australasia, and the United States of America but has yet to be widely used in the United Kingdom. To date, the topping upgrades used have been 40mm thick or greater. Depending on the choice of shear connection, this can lead to a four-fold increase in strength and stiffness of the floor. However, in many practical refurbishment situations, such a large increase in stiffness is not required, therefore a thinner topping can suffice. The overarching aim of this study has been to develop a thin (20mm) topping timber-concrete composite upgrade with a view to improving the serviceability performance of existing timber floors. Particular emphasis was given to developing an understanding of how the upgrade changes the stiffness and transient vibration response of a timber floor. Initially, an analytical study was carried out to define an appropriate topping thickness. An experimental testing programme was then completed to: characterise suitable shear connectors under static and cyclic loads, assess the benefit of the upgrade to the short-term bending performance of panels and floors, and evaluate the influence of the upgrade on the transient vibration response of a floor. For refurbishing timber floors, a 20mm thick topping sufficiently increased the bending stiffness and improved the transient vibration response. The stiffness of the screw connectors was influenced by the thickness of the topping and the inclination of the screws. During the short-term bending tests, the gamma method provided a non-conservative prediction of composite bending stiffness. In the majority of cases the modal frequencies of the floors tested increased after upgrade, whilst the damping ratios decreased. The upgrade system was shown to be robust as cracking of the topping did not influence the short-term bending performance of panels. Thin topping TCC upgrades offer a practical and effective solution to building practitioners, for improving the serviceability performance of existing timber floors.
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19 records – page 2 of 2.