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Environmental Thermal Comfort of a Reduced Model Using Cross-Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2695
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Energy Performance
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Roofs
Author
Sampaio, Carlos
Terezo, Rodrigo
Motta, Guilherme
Silva, Leonardo
Júnior, Ilson Vassem
Publisher
SciELO
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Roofs
Topic
Energy Performance
Keywords
Precasting in Wood
Self-Supporting
Thermal Comfort
Environmental Factors
Brazil
Thermal Performance
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Engenharia Agrícola
Summary
The challenges for the use of the cross-laminated timber (CLT) system in the Brazilian agricultural market are significant. This study evaluated the thermal performance of fiber cement tiles associated with a CLT non-conventional structure compared to those of ceramic, fiber cement and aluminum roof tiles based on following thermal comfort indexes (i.e., black globe humidity index (BGHI), radiant heat load (RHL) and specific enthalpy) using physical conventional models of reduced-scale rural facilities under summer conditions. The non-conventional CLT model comprised closing walls and a lining that form a self-supporting structure with few air inlets. This model presented reduced thermal comfort indexes compared to the other conventional roofs. Moreover, the CLT model has an average black globe temperature (Tbg) of 32.9 °C, which was lower at all times compared to those of the other roofs. In conclusion, the roof with fiber cement tiles associated with the CLT structure exhibited the best performance in terms of thermal comfort, followed by the ceramic, fiber cement, and aluminum tiles. The study results allow a better understanding of the opportunities for CLT usage.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Guide for Designing Energy-Efficient Building Enclosures for Wood-Frame Multi-Unit Residential Buildings in Marine to Cold Climate Zones in North America

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2620
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Energy Performance
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Author
Finch, Graham
Wang, J.
Ricketts, D.
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Book/Guide
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Topic
Energy Performance
Design and Systems
Keywords
Thermal Performance
Multi-Family
Residential Buildings
Energy Efficiency
Building Code
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The Guide for Designing Energy-Efficient Building Enclosures for Wood-Frame Multi-Unit Residential Buildings in Marine to Cold Climate Zones in North America was developed by FPInnovations in collaboration with RDH Building Engineering Ltd., the Homeowner Protection Office, Branch of BC Housing, and the Canadian Wood Council. The project is part of efforts within the Advanced Building Systems Program of FPInnovations to assemble and add to the knowledge base regarding Canadian wood products and building systems. The team of the Advanced Building Systems Program works with members and partners of FPInnovations to address critical technical issues that threaten existing markets for wood products or which limit expansion or access to such new markets. This guide was developed in response to the rapidly changing energy-efficiency requirements for buildings across Canada and the United States. This guide serves two major objectives: To assist architects, engineers, designers and builders in improving the thermal performance of building enclosures of wood multi-unit residential buildings (MURBs), in response to the increasingly stringent requirements for the energy efficiency of buildings in the marine to cold climate zones in North America (U.S. DOE/ASHRAE and NECB Climate Zones 5 through 7 and parts of Zone 4); To advance MURB design practices, construction practices, and material use based on best knowledge, in order to ensure the durable performance of wood-frame building enclosures that are insulated to higher levels than traditional wood-frame construction. The major requirements for thermal performance of building enclosures are summarized (up to February 2013), including those for the following codes and standards: 2011 National Energy Code of Canada for Buildings (2011 NECB); 2013 interim update of the 2010 National Building Code of Canada (2010 NBC, Section 9.36–Energy Efficiency); 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (2012 IECC); American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90.1– Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (2004, 2007, and 2010 versions). In addition to meeting the requirements of the various building codes and standards, a building may need to incorporate construction practices that reflect local preferences in material use, design and construction. Regional climate differences will also affect design solutions. This guide primarily addresses above-grade walls, below-grade walls and roofs of platform wood-frame construction. It also includes information regarding thermal performance of cross-laminated timber (CLT) assemblies as well as the use of non-bearing wood-frame exterior walls (infill walls) in wood post-and-beam and concrete structures. Examples of thermal resistance calculations, building assemblies, critical interface detailing, and appropriate material selection are provided to help guide designers and builders meet the requirements of the various energy-efficiency codes and standards, achieve above-code performance, and ensure long-term durability. This guide builds on the fundamentals of building science and on information contained within the Building Enclosure Design Guide: Wood-Frame Multi-Unit Residential Buildings, published by the Homeowner Protection Office, Branch of BC Housing. This guide is based on the best current knowledge and future updates are anticipated. The guide is not intended to be a substitute for professional advice that considers specific building parameters.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Illustrated Guide R30+ Effective Vaulted & Flat Roofs

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2348
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Moisture
Energy Performance
Design and Systems
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Roofs
Author
Marleau, Christopher
Higgins, James
Ricketts, Lorne
Roppel, Patrick
Publisher
BC Housing Research Centre
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Book/Guide
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Roofs
Topic
Moisture
Energy Performance
Design and Systems
Keywords
Vaulted Roofs
Water-Shedding Roofs
Flat Waterproof Membrane Roofs
Thermal Performance
Moisture Management
Air Leakage
Durability
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This Illustrated Guide consolidates information on vaulted water-shedding roofs and flat waterproof membrane roofs that are capable of meeting R-30 or greater effective thermal performance when used on low- and mid-rise wood-frame buildings. The guide is intended to be an industry, utility, and government resource with respect to meeting this thermal performance level, while not compromising other aspects of building enclosure performance, including moisture management, air leakage, and durability.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Thermal Performance and Apparent Temperature in School Buildings: A Case of Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) School Development

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2717
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Energy Performance
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Adekunle, Timothy
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Energy Performance
Keywords
Apparent Temperature
Thermal Performance
Wet-bulb Globe Temperature
Standard Effective Temperature
Universal Thermal Climate Index
School Buildings
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Building Engineering
Summary
This paper examines the performance and apparent temperature in cross-laminated timber (CLT) school buildings. The research presents empirical data on the performance and provides the first set of data on apparent temperature in CLT school buildings. The development is in the New England area of the Northeast of the US. The investigation was conducted in the summertime. The principal aim of the investigation is to evaluate the performance, occupants’ comfort, apparent temperature, and other thermal indices concurrently in CLT school buildings. The research intends to understand if occupants of CLT school buildings are susceptible to thermal stress in summer and assess whether apparent temperatures are consistent with sensation. The study also discusses other indices, practical implications, and applications of the outcomes. To achieve the research aim, the study considered the field measurements of variables. Occupants’ comfort is accessed using the PMV and adaptive methods of various comfort standards. During the survey, the development was occupied from 8am-6pm and partly operated from 7pm-7am. The mean temperatures during the occupied and non-occupied periods varied from 22.1°C-22.4°C. The overall RH was 59.2%. The PMV range and sensation showed the occupants were comfortable. Approximately 80% of the users were satisfied with the thermal environment. The temperatures were within the acceptable bands of ASHRAE-55, CIBSE TM52, and EN16798-1 thermal comfort models. The results showed that the apparent temperatures are consistent with the outcomes of the sensation at different periods. The mean indices ranged from 18.8°C-23.5°C. The study recommends that further research should be conducted on occupants’ comfort and heat indices in school buildings during the first few hours of occupation to understand changes that occupants can make to remove unwanted heat from the thermal environment. The study also recommends that various designers should consider heat stress analyses along with thermal comfort assessment at the design phase to determine possible interventions to improve the thermal environment of schools and other buildings.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Wood Innovation Research Laboratory (WIRL) Building Research Report

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2577
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Energy Performance
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Building Envelope
Organization
University of Northern British Columbia
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Building Envelope
Topic
Design and Systems
Energy Performance
Keywords
Performance
Sensors
Testing Methods
Energy Consumption
Thermal Performance
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The purpose of this research is to investigate what differences, if any, exist between the modeled energy consumption and building envelope performance of the Wood Innovation Research Laboratory (WIRL) building following eight months of in-situ data collection. The WIRL building was completed in July of 2018 by the University of Northern British Columbia (UNBC) and is located in Prince George, British Columbia. Built in partnership with the Province of British Columbia, the building was designed to meet Passive House standards, a building certification system that requires the building to have low energy input requirements due to high levels of thermal insulation and minimal air leakage. To ensure the building achieves the established energy use targets set forth under the Passive House certification system, a computer model of the proposed building design must be completed prior to the start of construction using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) software. Inputs to the model include envelope design, mechanical energy use, building location and airtightness value. Key outputs included the predicted annual heating demand (kWh/m2a), total primary energy demand (kWh/m2a), and air tightness of the building envelope (ACH@50Pa). Based on the final building design model and test results achieved following completion, the WIRL building was deemed to have met all Passive House requirements and certification was achieved. To complete on-going data collection of the in-situ performance of the WIRL building, temperature and humidity sensors were installed in two of the exterior wall assemblies and the building’s floor. In addition, gas and electrical energy use meters were installed to monitor the building’s energy consumption. The installation of all equipment was made possible by Forest Innovation Investment through their 2018/2019 Wood First Program.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail