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45 records – page 1 of 5.

Ability of Finger-Jointed Lumber to Maintain Load at Elevated Temperatures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1832
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Fire
Material
Other Materials
Author
Rammer, Douglas
Zelinka, Samuel
Hasburgh, Laura
Craft, Steven
Publisher
Forest Products Laboratory
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Journal Article
Material
Other Materials
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Small Scale
Full Scale
Bending Test
Melamine Formaldehyde
Phenol-Resorcinol Formaldehyde
Creep
Polyurethane
Polyvinyl Acetate
Temperature
Durability
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Wood and Fiber Science. 50(1): 44-54.
Online Access
Free
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Adhesive-Bonded Timber-Concrete Composites - Experimental Investigation of Thermal-Hygric Effects

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1519
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Serviceability
Mechanical Properties
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Author
Seim, Werner
Eisenhut, Lars
Kühlborn, Sonja
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Topic
Serviceability
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Climate
Long-term
Shear Strength
Deformation
Temperature
Moisture Content
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 597-605
Summary
The advantages of the two different building construction materials, timber and concrete, can be used effectively in adhesive-bonded timber-concrete composite constructions. The long-term behavior was investigated experimentally on small-scale shear and bond specimens under artificial, alternating climatic conditions and on fullscale specimens under natural climatic conditions for an application in construction practice. The development of the shear strength and the deformation behavior under permanent loads were studied, focusing on the different material behavior of wood and concrete regarding changes in temperature and moisture. The general applicability of adhesivebonded timber-concrete composites in construction practice was proved in the investigations.
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Block Shear Strength and Delamination of Cross-Laminated Timber Fabricated with Japanese Larch

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1220
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Gong, Yingchun
Wu, Guofang
Ren, Haiqing
Publisher
North Carolina State University
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Larch
Delamination
Block Shear Strength
Temperature
One-Component Polyurethane
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
BioResources
Summary
Process parameters of cross-laminated timber (CLT) fabricated with Japanese larch were evaluated. The process parameters were designed by using an orthogonal test including pressure, glue consumption, and adhesive. Both delamination and block shear tests were conducted on CLT in accordance with GB/T 26899 (2011). The results showed that the optimum process parameters were A2B3C2 including pressure (1.2 MPa), glue consumption (200g/m2), and amount of sdhesive (one-component plyurethane). The weight loss and moisture absoption increased when the temperature increased, but the block shear strength decreased as the temperature was raised from 20C to 230C.
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Correct Temperature Measurements in Fire Exposed Wood

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2025
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)

Cross-Laminated Timber Roof Panels at the Promega Corporation Facility: Documenting Installation and Monitoring In-Service Moisture Conditions

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue801
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Serviceability
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Glass, Samuel
Romanin, Jennifer
Schumacher, Jim
Spickler, Kris
Organization
Forest Products Laboratory
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Serviceability
Moisture
Keywords
Moisture
Temperature
Installation Process
Sensors
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The USDA Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) has, for the past two years, been assisting in removing technical barriers to the use of CLT and trying to develop interest in the United States for its utilization. Coincidentally, Promega Corporation, a leader in providing innovative solutions and technical support to the life sciences industry, is currently constructing a new facility in Fitchburg, Wisconsin, that features CLT. This is the first large-scale commercial utilization of CLT in the United States using CLT manufactured in North America. As with any new building system, it is important for the design and construction community to have information on how CLT is installed and how it performs. The objectives of this research are twofold: (1) to document the CLT installation process with photography and video and (2) to install sensors in the CLT panels and collect data on in-service moisture and temperature conditions.
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Delamination Occurrence in Engineered Mass Timber Products at Elevated Temperatures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1770
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Emberley, Richard
Yu, Zeyu
Fernando, Dilum
Torero, José
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Thermal Penetration Depths
Heat Flux
Shear Tests
Temperature
Delamination
Failure Modes
Charring
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 5294-5301
Summary
An experimental study was conducted to elucidate the effects of thermal penetration on delamination and the potential changes in failure mode of CLT. The first test series studied thermal penetration depths at various heat fluxes. The second test series consisted of single lap shear tests at homogeneous elevated temperatures followed by a...
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Free
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Description of Small and Large-Scale Cross Laminated Timber Fire Tests

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1339
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Rooms
Wood Building Systems
Author
Emberley, Richard
Putynska, Carmen
Bolanos, Aaron
Lucherini, Andrea
Solarte, Angela
Soriguer, Diana
Gonzalez, Mateo
Humphreys, Kathryn
Hidalgo, Juan
Maluk, Cristian
Law, Angus
Torero, Jose
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Netherlands
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Rooms
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Large Scale
Small Scale
Compartment Fire Test
Heat Flux
Temperature
Self-Extinction
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Fire Safety Journal
Summary
A large-scale fire test was conducted on a compartment constructed from cross laminated timber (CLT). The internal faces of the compartment were lined with non-combustible board, with the exception of one wall and the ceiling where the CLT was exposed directly to the fire inside the compartment. Extinction of the fire occurred without intervention. During the fire test, measurements were made of incident radiant heat flux, gas phase temperature, and in-depth temperature in the CLT. In addition, gas flow velocities and gas phase temperatures at the opening were measured, as well as incident heat fluxes at the facade due to flames and the plume leaving the opening. The fuel load was chosen to be sufficient to attain flashover, to achieve steadystate burning conditions of the exposed CLT, but to minimize the probability of uncertain behaviors induced by the specific characteristics of the CLT. Ventilation conditions were chosen to approximate maximum temperatures within a compartment. Wood cribs were used as fuel and, following decay of the cribs, selfextinction of the exposed CLT rapidly occurred. In parallel with the large-scale test, a small scale study focusing on CLT self-extinction was conducted. This study was used: to establish the range of incident heat fluxes for which self-extinction of the CLT can occur; the duration of exposure after which steady-state burning occurred; and the duration of exposure at which debonding of the CLT could occur. The large-scale test is described, and the results from both the small and large-scale tests are compared. It is found that selfextinction occurred in the large-scale compartment within the range of critical heat fluxes obtained from the small scale tests.
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Durability of Structural Lumber Products after Exposure at 82C and 80% Relative Humidity

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue784
Year of Publication
2005
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Moisture
Material
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Author
Green, David
Evans, James
Hatfield, Cherilyn
Byrd, Pamela
Organization
Forest Products Laboratory
Year of Publication
2005
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Report
Material
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Moisture
Keywords
Aspen
Douglas-Fir
Modulus of Elasticity
Modulus of Rupture
Southern Pine
Poplar
Relative Humidity
SPF
Temperature
Flexural Properties
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Solid-sawn lumber (Douglas-fir, southern pine, Spruce– Pine–Fir, and yellow-poplar), laminated veneer lumber (Douglas-fir, southern pine, and yellow-poplar), and laminated strand lumber (aspen and yellow-poplar) were heated continuously at 82°C (180°F) and 80% relative humidity (RH) for periods of up to 24 months. The lumber was then reconditioned to room temperature at 20% RH and tested in edgewise bending. Little reduction occurred in modulus of elasticity (MOE) of solid-sawn lumber, but MOE of composite lumber products was somewhat reduced. Modulus of rupture (MOR) of solid-sawn lumber was reduced by up to 50% after 24 months exposure. Reductions in MOR of up to 61% were found for laminated veneer lumber and laminated strand lumber after 12 months exposure. A limited scope study indicated that the results for laminated veneer lumber in edgewise bending are also applicable to flatwise bending. Comparison with previous results at 82°C (180°F)/25% RH and at 66°C (150°F)/20% RH indicate that differences in the permanent effect of temperature on MOR between species of solid-sawn lumber and between solid-sawn lumber and composite lumber products are greater at high humidity levels than at low humidity levels. This report also describes the experimental design of a program to evaluate the permanent effect of temperature on flexural properties of structural lumber, with reference to previous publications on the immediate effect of temperature and the effect of moisture content on lumber properties.
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Effect of Cold Temperatures on the Shear Behavior of Glued Laminated Beams

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue100
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Moisture
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Author
Drake, Garrett
Berry, Michael
Schroeder, David
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Netherlands
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Moisture
Keywords
Moisture Content
Shear Behaviour
Temperature
Four Point Bending Test
Failure Mechanisms
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Cold Regions Science and Technology
Summary
This study evaluated the effects of subfreezing temperatures and moisture content on the shear behavior of glulam beams. Full-scale glulam beams (79 mm by 229 mm deep) at two moisture contents (12 and 28%) and three temperatures (20 °C, 0 °C, and - 40 °C) were tested in four-point bending until failure. Temperature was observed to affect the failure mechanism of the beams, with the beams tested at 0 °C and 20 °C failing in shear and the beams tested at - 40 °C failing in tension. Further, the strengths of the beams and their stiffnesses were observed to increase with decreasing temperature, with these effects being more pronounced in the higher moisture content beams. Over the temperature range of 20 °C to - 40 °C, the 12 percent moisture content beams observed strength and stiffness gains of 17 and 22%, while the 28 percent moisture content beams observed respective gains of 37% and 66%.
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Effect of Moisture Induced Stresses on the Mechanical Performance of Glulam Beams of Vihantasalmi Bridge

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1609
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Moisture
Serviceability
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Bridges and Spans
Author
Hradil, Petr
Fortino, Stefania
Salokangas, Lauri
Musci, Alessandro
Metelli, Giovanni
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Bridges and Spans
Topic
Moisture
Serviceability
Keywords
Moisture Induced Stresses
Finland
Moisture Gradients
Moisture Content
Hygrothermal
Multi-Fickian Theory
Relative Humidity
Temperature
Eurocode 5
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 2159-2167
Summary
The present paper deals with the effect of moisture induced stresses (MIS) on the mechanical performance of a glulam beam of Vihantasalmi Bridge in Finland. MIS caused by high moisture gradients in a cross section of the glulam beam are calculated by a hygro-thermal multi-Fickian model for evaluation of moisture content, relative humidity and temperature in wood that is sequentially coupled with an orthotropic-viscoelasticmechanosorptive model for calculation of wood stresses. Both models, already developed in Abaqus FEM code by some of the authors in their previous works, had to be modified for the Nordic climate. The obtained levels of MIS are then compared to the Eurocode 5 design resistances. The study aims at providing suggestions to future developments of Eurocode 5 for the correct evaluation of the influence of moisture content on service life in timber bridge elements.
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Free
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45 records – page 1 of 5.