Skip header and navigation

Refine Results By

93 records – page 1 of 10.

The 200 m timber tower - A study on the possibilities of constructing a 200 meter tall timber building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3127
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Wind
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Gyllensten, Sebastian
Modig, Axel
Organization
Chalmers University of Technology
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Thesis
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Wind
Keywords
Aerodynamics
Tall Timber Structure
Wind Load
Acceleration
Research Status
Complete
Summary
As the interest in timber buildings is increasing, more attention is pointed towards highrise timber buildings. Partly because it is one of the main areas pushing the development within the field of timber structures. As the current tallest timber building, Mjöstornet in Brumunddal is approximately 10 times shorter than the world’s tallest building, Burj Khalifa, the intuition says that there is room for major improvements regarding tall timber structures. The aim of this thesis is therefore to investigate the possibilities to build a 200 m tall timber tower while still fulfilling the requirements for strength, stability and dynamics. In order to anchor the project in reality, the assumed building location is Gothenburg with the ground conditions of solid rock. Early in the study it was concluded that in order to push the height limits, the building design had to be improved compared to the existing timber buildings. The main geometries of interest turned out to be the circular shape thanks to its aerodynamical benefits. This base shape was applied in various ways, generating five different concepts ready for evaluation. Each of the five concepts were modelled and preliminary sized using Grasshopper and Karamba 3D, whereafter they were evaluated based on their dynamic performance, global stiffness, and a few other evaluation criteria. The evaluation was primary made with structural performance in mind and secondary with regard to comfort, quality and economical aspects. The results show that one of the concepts have great potential of reaching 200 m despite the uncertainties regarding joint stiffness and structural damping. Also, a few of the other concepts might be able to reach 200 m if subject to some structural and dynamical improvements.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Achieving Sustainable Urban Buildings with Seismically Resilient Mass Timber Core Wall and Floor System

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2802
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Cores
Walls
Floors
Wood Building Systems
Organization
Portland State University
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Cores
Walls
Floors
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Hold-Down
Seismic Performance
Core Walls
Parametric Analysis
Deformation Capacity
Overstrength
Mid-Rise
High-Rise
Tall Wood Buildings
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Peter Dusicka at Portland State University
Summary
The urgency in increasing growth in densely populated urban areas, reducing the carbon footprint of new buildings, and targeting rapid return to occupancy following disastrous earthquakes has created a need to reexamine the structural systems of mid- to high-rise buildings. To address these sustainability and seismic resiliency needs, the objective of this research is to enable an all-timber material system in a way that will include architectural as well as structural considerations. Utilization of mass timber is societally important in providing buildings that store, instead of generate, carbon and increase the economic opportunity for depressed timber-producing regions of the country. This research will focus on buildings with core walls because those building types are some of the most common for contemporary urban mid- to high-rise construction. The open floor layout will allow for commercial and mixed-use occupancies, but also will contain significant technical knowledge gaps hindering their implementation with mass timber. The research plan has been formulated to fill these gaps by: (1) developing suitable mid- to high-rise archetypes with input from multiple stakeholders, (2) conducting parametric system-level seismic performance investigations, (3) developing new critical components, (4) validating the performance with large-scale experimentation, and (5) bridging the industry information gaps by incorporating teaching modules within an existing educational and outreach framework. Situated in the heart of a timber-producing region, the multi-disciplinary team will utilize the local design professional community with timber experience and Portland State University's recently implemented Green Building Scholars program to deliver technical outcomes that directly impact the surrounding environment. Research outcomes will advance knowledge at the system performance level as well as at the critical component level. The investigated building system will incorporate cross laminated timber cores, floors, and glulam structural members. Using mass timber will present challenges in effectively achieving the goal of desirable seismic performance, especially seismic resiliency. These challenges will be addressed at the system level by a unique combination of core rocking combined with beam and floor interaction to achieve non-linear elastic behavior. This system behavior will eliminate the need for post-tensioning to achieve re-centering, but will introduce new parameters that can directly influence the lateral behavior. This research will study the effects of these parameters on the overall building behavior and will develop a methodology in which designers could use these parameters to strategically control the building seismic response. These key parameters will be investigated using parametric numerical analyses as well as large-scale, sub-system experimentation. One of the critical components of the system will be the hold-down, a device that connects the timber core to the foundation and provides hysteretic energy dissipation. Strength requirements and deformation demands in mid- to high-rise buildings, along with integration with mass timber, will necessitate the advancement of knowledge in developing this low-damage component. The investigated hold-down will have large deformation capability with readily replaceable parts. Moreover, the hold-down will have the potential to reduce strength of the component in a controlled and repeatable way at large deformations, while maintaining original strength at low deformations. This component characteristic can reduce the overall system overstrength, which in turn will have beneficial economic implications. Reducing the carbon footprint of new construction, linking rural and urban economies, and increasing the longevity of buildings in seismic zones are all goals that this mass timber research will advance and will be critical to the sustainable development of cities moving forward.
Resource Link
Less detail

Advanced Methods of Encapsulation

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue41
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Ranger, Lindsay
Roy-Poirier, Audrey
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2015
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Codes
Encapsulation
Type X Gypsum Board
National Building Code of Canada
Tall Wood
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This project aims to support the construction of tall wood buildings by identifying encapsulation methods that provide adequate protection of mass timber elements; the intention is that these methods could potentially be applied to mass timber elements so that the overall assembly could achive a 2 h fire resistance rating.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Advanced Wood-Based Solutions for Mid-Rise and High-Rise Construction: In-Situ Testing of The Arbora Building for Vibration and Acoustic Performances

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1179
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Hu, Lin
Cuerrier-Auclair, Samuel
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Design and Systems
Keywords
Sound Insulation
Tall Wood
Vibration Performance
Mid-Rise
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This report addresses serviceability issues of tall wood buildings focusing on vibration and sound insulation performance. The sound insulation and vibration performance may not affect building's safety, but affects occupants' comfort and proper operation of the buildings and the funciton of sensitive equipment, consequently the acceptance of midrise and tall wood buildings in market place. Lack of data, knowledge and experience of sound and vibration performance of tall wood buildings is one of the issues related to design and construction of tall wood buildings.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Analyse de Performance Acoustique et de Résistance au Feu

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2752
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Organization
Société en commandite NEB
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Fire
Keywords
Origine
Fire Resistance
Acoustic Performance
Tall Timber
Multi-Storey
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Le présent rapport décrit une partie des activités de recherche et développement (R&D) en lien avec la démonstration de la résistance au feu ainsi que les études sur la performance acoustique effectuées dans le cadre de la construction du bâtiment Origine. Ce bâtiment est la tour résidentielle en bois massif la plus haute au Québec. Sa réalisation a débuté en 2015 à la suite des analyses préliminaires de faisabilité technique-économique qui se sont étalées pendant toute l’année 2014. La construction et l’installation se sont finalisées vers la fin de 2017. En premier lieu, le rapport présente les démarches liées à la réalisation d’un exercice de démonstration d’incendie pour une cage d’escaliers/ascenseur avec une chambre d’habitation adjacente, l’analyse de résultats et les principales conclusions en lien avec la pertinence de l’utilisation du bois massif pour des édifices de grande hauteur. En ce qui concerne la performance acoustique, le rapport présente la méthodologie d’étude et d’analyse des résultats des tests acoustiques pour des assemblages de mur et de plancher utilisés dans le projet Origine. De plus, ce rapport facilite la compréhension des activités réalisées et permet de montrer objectivement la capacité des produits en bois massif à offrir un environnement sécuritaire et confortable aux occupants de bâtiments multi-étagés. Les principaux résultats indiquent que les cages d’escaliers/ascenseur faites en bois massif, conçues pour une résistance au feu équivalente à celle faites en béton, peuvent offrir une excellente performance et servent d’alternatives adéquates pour les bâtiments multi-étagés. En ce qui concerne le développement d’assemblages acoustiques pour les murs et les planchers en bois massif, il a été prouvé qu’une approche multicritère permet d’offrir des solutions performantes à des coûts raisonnables. Finalement, il est clair que ce projet constitue un jalon très important dans le chemin d’acceptation des bâtiments multi-étagés en bois massif au Québec et au Canada. Sa construction, faite presque entièrement en bois, a nécessité de nombreux efforts économiques, de R&D, de conception et d’installation. De plus, les activités réalisées pour l’acceptation de ce type de construction ont permis de mettre en place de nouvelles technologies et des techniques de conception qui faciliteront la réplication de ce type de projet partout en Amérique du Nord.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

An Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from CLT and Glulam in Two Residential Nearly Zero Energy Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2441
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

An Uplift Friction Damper for Seismically Resilient Mass-Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2799
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Hybrid Building Systems
Organization
Michigan Technological University
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Seismic Force Resisting System
Uplift Friction Damper
Energy Dissipation
Self-Centering
Numerical Model
Tall Wood Buildings
National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Daniel Dowden at Michigan Technological University
Summary
This award will investigate a low-damage solution for cross-laminated timber (CLT) seismic force-resisting systems (SFRSs) using a novel uplift friction damper (UFD) device for seismically resilient mass-timber buildings. The UFD device will embrace the natural rocking wall behavior that is expected in tall CLT buildings, provide stable energy dissipation, and exhibit self-centering characteristics. Structural repair of buildings with these devices is expected to be minimal after a design level earthquake. Although CLT has emerged as a construction material that has revitalized the timber industry, there exists a lack of CLT-specific seismic energy dissipation devices that can integrate holistically with the natural kinematics of CLT-based SFRSs. CLT wall panels themselves do not provide any measurable seismic energy dissipation. As a payload to the large-scale, ten-story CLT building specimen to be tested on the Natural Hazards Engineering Research Infrastructure (NHERI) shake table at the University of California, San Diego, as part of NSF award 1636164, “Collaborative Research: A Resilience-based Seismic Design Methodology for Tall Wood Buildings,” this project will conduct a series of tests with the UFD devices installed on the CLT building specimen. These tests will bridge analytical and numerical models with the high fidelity test data collected with realistic boundary and earthquake loading conditions. The calibrated models will be incorporated in a probabilistic numerical framework to establish a design methodology for seismically resilient tall wood buildings, leading to a more diverse and eco-sustainable urban landscape. This project will provide local elementary school outreach activities, integrate participation of undergraduate minorities and underrepresented groups into the research activities, and foster graduate level curriculum innovations. Project data will be archived and made available publicly in the NSF-supported NHERI Data Depot (https://www.DesignSafe-CI.org). This award contributes to NSF's role in the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP). The research objectives of this payload project are to: 1) bridge the fundamental mechanistic UFD models linking analytical and numerical models necessary for seismic response prediction of seismically resilient CLT-based SFRSs, 2) characterize the fundamental dynamic UFD behavior with validation and calibration through large-scale tests with realistic boundary conditions and earthquake loadings, and 3) integrate low-damage, friction-based damping system alternatives within a resilience-based seismic design methodology for tall wood buildings. To achieve these objectives, the test data collected will provide a critical pathway to reliably establish numerical and analytical models that extend the shake table test results to a broad range of archetype buildings. The seismic performance of mass-timber archetype building systems will be established through collapse risk assessment using incremental dynamic analyses. This will provide a first step in the longer term goal of establishing code-based seismic performance factors for CLT-based SFRSs.
Resource Link
Less detail

Ascent - Challenges and Advances of Tall Mass Timber Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2751
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Fernandez, Alejandro
Komp, Jordan
Peronto, John
Publisher
KoreaScience
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Tall Timber
Tall Timber Buildings
United States
Ascent
Challenges
Structural
Research Status
Complete
Series
International Journal of High-Rise Buildings
Summary
Ascent, a 25 story residential tower located in Milwaukee, WI (USA), will become the tallest timber building in the world upon completion. This paper discusses the project's structural system, permit process, groundbreaking project specific testing, and several of the challenges the team overcame, all of which open the door to future Mass Timber projects; particularly in the United States.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Behavior of CLT Diaphragm Panel-to-Panel Connections with Self-tapping Screws

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2188
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Roofs
Organization
TallWood Design Institute
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Roofs
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Keywords
Screws
Tall Wood
Earthquake
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Thomas Miller at Oregon State University
Summary
Understanding how roof and floor systems (commonly called diaphragms by engineers) that are built from Pacific Northwest-sourced cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels perform in earthquake prone areas is a critical area of research. These building components are key to transferring normal and extreme event forces into walls and down to the foundation. The tests performed in this project will provide data on commonly used approaches to connecting CLT panels within a floor or roof space and the performance of associated screw fasteners. Structural engineers will directly benefit through improved modeling tools. A broader benefit may be increased confidence in the construction of taller wood buildings in communities at greater risk for earthquakes.
Less detail

Behaviour of Cross-laminated Timber Wall Systems Under Monotonic Lateral Loading

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2404
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
McPolin, Daniel
Hughes, C.
McGetrick, P.
McCrum, D.
Publisher
Taylor&Francis Online
Year of Publication
2019
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Tall Timber Buildings
Lateral Load
Earthquake
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Structural Integrity and Maintenance
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

93 records – page 1 of 10.