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Acoustic Characteristics of Cross-Laminated Timber Systems

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2618
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Di Bella, Antonino
Mitrovic, Milica
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Design and Systems
Keywords
Wooden Building Technology
Building Acoustics
Noise Control
Flanking Transmission
Energy Efficiency
Sustainability
Research Status
Complete
Series
Sustainability
Summary
The growing diffusion of cross-laminated timber structures (CLT) has been accompanied by extensive research on the peculiar characteristics of this construction system, mainly concerning its economic and environmental benefits, lifecycle, structural design, resistance to seismic actions, fire protection, and energy efficiency. Nevertheless, some aspects have not yet been fully analysed. These include both the knowledge of noise protection that CLT systems are able to offer in relation to the possible applications and combinations of building elements, and the definition of calculation methods necessary to support the acoustic design. This review focuses on the main acoustic features of CLT systems and investigate on the results of the most relevant research aimed to provide key information on the application of acoustic modelling in CLT buildings. The vibro-acoustic behaviour of the basic component of this system and their interaction through the joints has been addressed, as well as the possible ways to manage acoustic information for calculation accuracy improvement by calibration with data from on-site measurements during the construction phase. This study further suggests the opportunity to improve measurement standards with specific reference curves for the bare CLT building elements, in order to compare different acoustic linings and assemblies on the same base. In addition, this study allows to identify some topics in the literature that are not yet fully clarified, providing some insights on possible future developments in research and for the optimization of these products.
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Basis of Design - Performance-Based Design and Structural CD Drawings for Framework Office Building in Portland, OR

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1827
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Organization
KPFF Consulting Engineers
Year of Publication
2017
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Structural
Wind Load
Sustainability
Reliability
Seismic
Earthquake Resistance
Serviceability
Design
Research Status
Complete
Series
Framework: An Urban + Rural Design
Notes
Document includes 100% CD construction drawings
Summary
This document outlines the basis of design for the performance-based design and nonlinear response history analysis of the Framework Project in Portland, OR. It is intended to be a living document that will be modified and revised as the project develops and in response to peer review comments. Performance-based design is pursued for this project because the proposed lateral force-resisting system, consisting of post-tensioned rocking cross-laminated timber (CLT) walls is not included in ASCE/SEI 7-10 Table 12.2-1. Lateral force-resisting systems included in ASCE/SEI 7-10 Table 12.2-1 may be designed for earthquake effects using the prescriptive provisions in ASCE/SEI 7- 10. Lateral force-resisting systems not included are still permitted but must be demonstrated to have performance not less than that expected for included systems. This option is available via the performance-based procedures of ASCE/SEI 7-10 Section 1.3.1.3. Note that lateral forceresisting systems for wind effects are not restricted in ASCE/SEI 7-10. Therefore, design for wind effects will still be approached within the performance-based design framework but in a more state-of-the-practice manner.
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Braced Frame System for Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2527
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Frames
Author
Iqbal, Asif
Organization
University of Northern British Columbia
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Report
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Frames
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Lateral Load Resisting Systems
Sustainability
Post-Tensioned
Connections
Braced Frame Model
Timber-Steel Hybrid
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Advanced sustainable lateral load resisting systems that combine ductile and recyclable materials offer a viable solution to resist seismic load effects in environmentally responsible ways. This paper presents the seismic response of a post-tensioned timber-steel hybrid braced frame. This hybrid system combines glulam frame with steel braces to improve lateral stiffness while providing self-centreing capability under seismic loads. The proposed system is first presented. A detailed numerical model of the proposed system is then developed with emphasis on the connections and inelastic response of bracing members. Various types of braced frames including diagonal, cross and chevron configurations are numerically examined to assess the viability of the proposed concept and to confirm the efficiency of the system. A summary of initial findings is presented to demonstrate usefulness of the hybrid system. The results demonstrate that the proposed system increases overall lateral stiffness and ductility while still being able to achieve self-centring. Some additional information on connection details are provided for implementation in practical structures. The braced-frame solution is expected to widen options for lateral load resisting systems for mid-to-high-rise buildings.
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Free
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Carterton Events Centre Auditorium Pres-Lam Wall Design and Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue38
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Seismic
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Author
Dekker, Dave
Chung, Stanley
Palermo, Alessandro
Year of Publication
2012
Format
Conference Paper
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Lateral Loads
Post-Tensioned
Pres-Lam
Sustainability
Conference
New Zealand Society for Earthquake Engineering Conference
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 13-15, 2012, Christchurch, New Zealand
Summary
Driven by sustainability, locally available resources and expertise, and economy, the design of the Carterton Events Centre focused on timber for the majority of the main structural and non-structural components. Combined with a client desire for minimization of earthquake damage, dissipative post-tensioned rocking Laminated Veneer Lumber (LVL) shear walls (Pres-Lam) were considered for the lateral load resisting system. During design development various structural forms were explored and tested through costing to determine an economic design solution meeting the project drivers. Advanced numerical analyses carried out by the University of Canterbury validated the design process assuring confidence with the design of the technology.
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Free
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The Case for CLT Manufacturing in Maine

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2382
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Market and Adoption
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Comparative Cradle-to-Grave Life Cycle Assessment of Low and Mid-Rise Mass Timber Buildings with Equivalent Structural Steel Alternatives

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2880
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Allan, Kevin
Phillips, Adam
Organization
Washington State University
Editor
Bakolas, Asterios
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Steel
Sustainability
Life-Cycle Assessment
Life-Cycle Impact Assessment
Research Status
Complete
Series
Sustainability
Summary
The objective of this paper was to quantify and compare the environmental impacts associated with alternative designs of typical North American low and mid-rise buildings. Two scenarios were considered: a traditional structural steel frame or an all-wood mass timber design, utilizing engineered wood products for both gravity and lateral load resistance. The boundary of the quantitative analysis was cradle-to-grave with considerations taken to discuss end-of-life and material reuse scenarios. The TRACI methodology was followed to conduct a Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) analysis that translates building quantities to environmental impact indicators using the Athena Impact Estimator for Buildings Life Cycle analysis software tool and Athena’s Life Cycle Inventory database. The results of the analysis show that mass timber buildings have an advantage with respect to several environmental impact categories, including eutrophication potential, human health particulate, and global warming potential where a 31% to 41% reduction was found from mass timber to steel designs, neglecting potential carbon sequestration benefits from the timber products. However, it was also found that the steel buildings have a lower impact with respect to the environmental impact categories of smog potential, acidification potential, and ozone depletion potential, where a 48% to 58% reduction was found from the steel to the mass timber building designs.
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A Comparative Life Cycle Assessment Approach of Two Innovative Long Span Timber floors with its Reinforced Concrete Equivalent in an Australian Context

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2375
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Wood Building Systems
Author
Basaglia, Bella
Lewis Kirsten
Shrestha, Rijun
Crews, Keith
Publisher
School of Civial Engineering, The University of Queensland
Year of Publication
2015
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Sustainable Materials
LCA
Life-Cycle Assessment
Mid-Rise
Concrete
Conference
International Conference on Performance-based and Life-cycle Structural Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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A comparative study between glulam and concrete columns in view of design, economy and environment

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3134
Year of Publication
2022
Topic
Cost
Environmental Impact
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Columns
Author
Hassan, Osama A.B.
A.A., Nour Emad
Abdulahad, Gabriel
Organization
Linköping University
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2022
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Columns
Topic
Cost
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Sustainability
Eurocode
Greenhouse Gases
Cost Estimate
Research Status
Complete
Series
Case Studies in Construction Materials
Summary
In this paper, it is attempted to study possible sustainability solutions for building structures. In this context, comparisons are made between two load-bearing columns with different building materials – glued laminated timber and concrete – with regard to structural design, economic consequences and the emission of greenhouse gases. In terms of structural design, the results show that with small axial forces, glulam columns will result in smaller cross-sectional areas compared to concrete columns. However, at larger axial forces, concrete columns will result in smaller cross-sectional areas than glulam columns. An increased column length also means larger dimensions for glulam columns, but this does not always apply to concrete columns. With respect to environmental impact, it is shown that using glulam columns is the more environmentally friendly option. From an economic point of view, the cost estimates for glulam and concrete columns may vary depending on the country and the abundance of the construction material. In Sweden, a forest-rich country, it is shown that the costs for both column types are quite similar considering small axial loads. At higher axial loading, concrete is generally the cheaper alternative.
Online Access
Free
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Comparison of Carbon Footprints: Mass Timber Buildings vs Steels – A Literature Review

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2380
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Cooney, Emily
Publisher
Lakehead University
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Sustainability
Carbon Footprint
Mass Timber
Steel
Greenhouse Gases
Climate Change
Engineered Wood Product (EWP)
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Sustainability and innovation are key components in the fight against climate change. Mass timber buildings have been gaining popularity due to the renewable nature of timber. Although research comparing mass timber buildings to more mainstream buildings such as steel is still in the early stages and therefore, limited. We are looking to determine the difference between carbon footprints of mass timber and traditional steel and concrete buildings. This is done with the intention of determining the sustainability and practicality of mass timber buildings.
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Free
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Comparison of Sustainability Performance for Cross Laminated Timber and Concrete

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue509
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Piacenza, Joseph
Tumer, Irem
Seyedmahmoudi, Seyedhamed
Haapala, Karl
Hoyle, Christopher
Publisher
ASME
Year of Publication
2013
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Life-Cycle Assessment
Social Impact
Sustainability
Reinforced Concrete
Economic Aspect
Manufacturing
Conference
International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 4–7, 2013, Portland, Oregon, USA
Summary
As sustainable building design practices become more prevalent in today’s construction market, designers are looking to alternative materials for novel design strategies. This paper presents a case study comparing the sustainability performance of cross laminated timber (CLT) and reinforced concrete. A comparative sustainability assessment of cross laminated timber and concrete, considering economic, environmental, and social aspects was performed. Environmental impact is measured in terms of CO2 equivalent, economic impact is measured with total sector cost (including sector interdependencies), and qualitative metrics were considered for social impact. In order to conduct an accurate performance comparison, a functional unit of building facade volume was chosen for each product. For this paper, several end-of-life strategies were modeled for CLT and concrete facades. To understand environmental, economic, and social impact, three different scenarios were analyzed to compare performance of both CLT and concrete, including cradle to gate product manufacturing, manufacturing with landfill end-of-life, and manufacturing with recycling end-of-life. Environmental LCA was modeled using GaBi 5.0 Education Edition, which includes its own database for elements including materials, processes, and transportation. To compare the economic impact, Carnegie Mellon’s EIO-LCA online tool is used. Finally, social life cycle impact was considered by identifying process attributes of both products that affect the social domain. Based on this analysis, the use of CLT has a significantly lower environmental impact than concrete, however there are additional costs.
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62 records – page 1 of 7.