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Identifying the Economic Barriers to CLT Cost Estimation Among Building Construction Professionals

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2345
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Cost
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Stutesman, Jonathan H.
Organization
Virginia Tech
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Cost
Keywords
Cost Estimation
Survey
Commercial
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Cross-laminated timbers (CLTs) are strong and lightweight structural building materials. CLTs are made from renewable wood resources and have significant economic potential as a new value-added product for the United States. However, market penetration has been obstructed by product affordability and lack of availability for use. Previous studies and projects have surveyed opinions of designers and contractors about the adoption of CLTs. No previous study was found that surveyed cost estimators, who serve the essential function of creating economic comparisons of alternative materials in commercial construction. CLTs are not included in these current cost estimation tools and software packages which may be limiting the potential use of CLT in construction. The purpose of this study was to discover if cost estimation is being used to make structural decisions potentially affecting the marketability of CLT use in construction and building design because of the ability to estimate CLTs adequately. Through the use of a survey, the re-designing of a building, and discussions with subject matter experts, this study examined the knowledge level of cross-laminated timbers of under-surveyed building construction professions and the relationship between cost estimation and structural material choices. Their responses are demonstrating the need for better cost estimation tools for cross-laminated timbers such as inclusion in the Construction Specifications Institute's classification systems in order for CLTs to become a more competitive product. The study concluded that cost estimation is important for CLT market development, because it is being used extensively in the construction industry.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Structural Timber Design in Curricula of Canadian Universities: Current Status and Future Needs

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2879
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
General Information
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Daneshvar, Hossein
Goni, Tahiat
Zhang, Sigong
Kelterborn, Reed
Chui, Ying Hei
Organization
University of Alberta
University of Exeter
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2021
Country of Publication
Canada
United Kingdom
Format
Journal Article
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
General Information
Keywords
Education
Timber Engineering
Sustainability
Survey
Decision Matrix
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Education Sciences
Summary
Due to the efficiency, sustainability, and advances in firefighting technologies, the allowable height for wood buildings was increased from 4 to 6 storeys in 2015 and will be further increased to 12 storeys in the 2020 edition of the National Building Code of Canada, as a result of the advent and application of mass timber products. To match the development in the industry and the increasing need in the market for highly skilled timber engineers, structural timber design curricula at the university level must evolve to train the next generation of practitioners. At most Canadian universities, structural timber design courses are mainly provided in civil engineering departments. In this study, 31 accredited civil engineering programs in Canada were reviewed for structural wood design content at undergraduate and graduate levels based on two surveys conducted in 2018 and 2020. In the 2018 survey, the percentage of structural timber design content was estimated and compared with other engineering materials (e.g., steel, concrete, and masonry), and a similar survey was repeated in 2020 to determine if any significant changes had occurred. In early 2021, two complementary questionnaires were sent to the instructors of timber-related courses across the country to collect quantitative information, including enrollment statistics, percentage dedicated to timber design in combined material courses, and potential topics deemed critical to support the design of modern timber structures. Based on the responses provided, and also on the availability of resources and the research ongoing, the content for five advanced-level courses is proposed to address the needs of the timber design community. The findings presented in this paper will assist the timber industry, government agencies, and educational institutions in effecting potential changes to university curricula to educate the next generation of timber design professionals who will possess the necessary skills and knowledge to meet the challenges in designing modern mass timber structures.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Summary Report: Survey of International Tall Wood Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1870
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Market and Adoption
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Other Materials
Application
Wood Building Systems

Understanding Costs and Identifying Value in Mass Timber Construction: Calculating the ‘Total Cost of Project’ (TCP)

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1897
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Cost
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Kremer, Paul
Ritchie, Laurence
Publisher
Mass Timber Construction Journal
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Cost
Keywords
Cost Versus Value
Quantity Survey
Productivity
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Mass Timber Construction Journal
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail