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7 records – page 1 of 1.

Development of Timber Buckling Restrained Braces for Mass Timber Braced Frames

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2544
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Application
Frames
Author
Murphy, Colton
Pantelides, Chris
Blomgren, Hans-Erik
Rammer, Douglas
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Conference Paper
Application
Frames
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Brace
Buckling
Damping
Fuse
Seismic
Structure
Timber
Language
English
Conference
International Network on Timber Engineering Research
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Buckling Restrained Brace Frames (BRBF) are a proven and reliable method to provide an efficient lateral force resisting system for new and existing structures in earthquake prone regions. The fuse-type elements in this system facilitate stable energy dissipation at large load deformation levels. Currently, the new trend towards mass timber vertical structures creates a need for a lightweight compatible lateral force resisting system. A Buckling Restrained Brace (BRB) component is possible to construct and feasible to implement when combining a steel core with a mass timber casing herein named the Timber-Buckling Restrained Brace (T-BRB). T-BRBs when combined with mass timber beam and column elements can create a system that will have advantages over the current steel framed BRBF system when considering recyclability, sustainability, framing compatibility, and performance. This paper presents findings on small scale testing of candidate engineered wood products for the T-BRB casing and testing of six full scale 12 ft long 60 kip braces according to code prescribed loading protocols and acceptance criteria.
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Influence of Micro Structured Surface on the Bond Quality of Hardwood

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue454
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Connections
Cost
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Author
Lehmann, Martin
Volkmer, Thomas
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Connections
Cost
Keywords
Beech
Delamination
Hardwood
Melamine Urea Formaldehyde
Production Costs
Micro-structure
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
The state of the art requires a closed waiting time of about one hour for the beech glulam production. This has a negative influence on the production costs. Micro structured surfaces showed good performance in combination with coatings. The authors have performed tension-shear and delaminating test in order to investigate the influence of micro structured surfaces on the bond quality of hardwoods. The results are very promising and show clearly improved delaminating resistance for all tested adhesive. No closed waiting time was needed to achieve satisfying results using MUF in combination with beech.
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Long-span Timber Roof Structure for the New Feyenoord Stadium

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2575
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Roofs

Modular Timber Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2748
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Frames
Author
Kuda, D
Petrícková, M
Publisher
IOP Publishing Ltd
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Frames
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Modular Structure
High-Rise
Load Bearing
Case Study
Gridshell
Universal System
Language
English
Conference
International Conference on New Advances in Civil Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Series
IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering
Summary
Related to sustainability movement and minimizing the carbon footprint, timber structures are becoming more attractive. Wood, as main structural material, offers many benefits relate mostly to economic and ecological aspects, compared to other materials as steel or concrete. On the other hand, physical characteristics of wood complicate the usage of a timber for high-rise or large-span structures. It brings a new challenge for architects and engineers to deliver feasible solution for usability of timber, despite its features. One of the possible solutions could be implementation of CLT (Cross-Laminate Timber) panels in structural systems developed earlier for buildings made of prefabricated concrete slabs. SOM in cooperation with Oregon State University are currently testing composite slabs made of CLT and thin concrete layer reinforcing the wood and protecting it from fire. Although the system solution looks promising, and could bring the result, slabs limit using of the space in layout. On the other hand, frame structures would be much more efficient. This article comes up with an idea of modular frame structure, which could help to solve the problem. The scheme is based on "gridshell" type systems, where rods form a more efficient shell for dealing with stress forces.
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A Post-tensioned Cross-Laminated Timber Core for Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2700
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Cores
Walls
Author
Znabei, Tigist
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Cores
Walls
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Keywords
Prestress
Post-Tensioning
Bending
Shear Stiffness
Core Structure
Compressive Strength
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This master thesis is on post-tensioning cross-laminated timber stability cores for multiple story buildings. When designing a CLT core, significantly larger core sections will be needed than when designing a stabilizing core in concrete. This is for one part due to the limited stiffness of the CLT compared to concrete. For another part it is due to the limited stiffness of connectors in CLT. Sliding and uplift can occur in connections in CLT loaded in tension and shear respectively. The CLT panels behave like rigid bodies, with most of the displacement occurring at the connections. In addition, cooperation between flange and web may be limited, depending on the stiffness of the corner connection and the occurrence of shear lag. Post-tensioning is suggested as a solution to diminish uplift and sliding in the connectors. In this way, with the same core section, a taller building may be realized compared to the non-post-tensioned case. In the thesis also the long-term effects on the prestress level is assessed, as estimating these effects is important for the safety of the system.This thesis adds to the body of knowledge on post-tensioned CLT structures. Firstly, previous studies on post-tensioned CLT focus on individual shear walls and on seismic design situations. This thesis explores how beneficial post-tensioning is from the perspective of serviceability limit state governed design. Furthermore, though post-tensioning as a prestressing method has been applied often in concrete structures, prestressing of CLT is a novel research subject. Especially the estimation of long-term force loss is a topic that still requires research. This thesis provides the designer with a straightforward calculation method (using python) for estimation of prestress force loss in the long-term.The research was carried out with a literature study and a case-study. The literature research comprised of studies on structural design with CLT loaded in-plane; the effective flange of a CLT core; stiffness of connections in CLT; prestressing of CLT; a design approach for post-tensioning; time dependent losses in post-tensioned CLT. The case study was based on a fictitious floorplan including a “minimal core”, and at expressing the benefit of post-tensioning in terms of height gain.The degree to which the flange and the web cooperate showed highly dependent on the connection between flange and web and the core height. In the case study, the effective flange width showed to depend highly on the height of the core and the stiffness of the connection between flange and web.In the case-study, without post-tensioning, approximately half of the displacements could be attributed to the connections. With post-tensioning, the uplift and sliding displacements in the horizontal joints was eliminated. Consequently, the attainable height was significantly increased: from 5 storeys in the un-post-tensioned case, to 8 storeys in the post-tensioned case. Long-term effects on the prestress loss were considerable. In the case-study, approximately 40% loss of post-tension force in the lifetime of the building was predicted and included in the design. Largest causeof force loss was due to changes of moisture content during construction. The remaining lateral displacements after post-tensioning were due to bending and shear.Post-tensioning of CLT cores is a powerful method for reducing lateral displacements in cases where uplift and sliding are dominant contributors to the lateral displacements. This is especially the case in light-weight buildings. Uplift and sliding displacements can be eliminated altogether with post-tensioning. The designer should realize that post-tensioning does not increase the bending and shear stiffness of the core. The thesis also concludes that with the post-tensioning of CLT walls, the compressive strength of the CLT in the so-called “compression-toe” might be exceeded. It is an important check in design. Furthermore, depending on the decision to re-tighten the rods at some point or not, the post-tension force loss should be calculated and included in finding the right prestress level. For this estimation of the moisture level of the CLT proved to be an important but difficult step. It is likely that the 40% force loss in the case-study is on the conservative side, since a large change in moisture content has been assumed. In practice, the moisture content can be measured on site. This can help verify the assumptions on the moisture content used in force loss calculations. This can help in assuring the structure is safe in the long-term.
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Systems in Timber Engineering: Loadbearing Structures and Component Layers

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2115
Year of Publication
2008
Topic
Design and Systems
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Kolb, Josef
Editor
Lignum - Holzwirtschaft Schweiz
DGfH - German Society of Wood Research
Publisher
Birkhäuser Basel
Year of Publication
2008
Country of Publication
Germany
Format
Book/Guide
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Load Bearing
Construction
Timber Construction
Timber Preservation
Building Systems
Loadbearing Structure
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
ISBN
978-3-7643-8689-4
ISSN
978-3-7643-8690-0
Summary
Timber construction has become completely modernized. It has gained considerably in market share with respect to competing building materials and is dominated by systems such as frame and solid timber construction. Every timber construction is determined by its structure. Hence it is essential to know the connections and relationships from the design stage right through to the construction phase. Systems in Timber Engineering takes a whole new approach to this subject. It is a comprehensive, analytical, and visually organized treatment, from the simple single-family house to the large-scale multistore structure. It includes the building envelope, which is so important for saving energy, and systems for ceilings and interior dividing walls, which are so essential from the vantage point of construction. This work uses plans, schematic drawings, and pictures to show the current and forward-looking state of the technology as applied in Switzerland, a leading country in the field of timber construction.
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Verification of Seismic Resistant Performance of Developed Original Cross-Laminated Timber Core Structure Method by Shaking Table Experiment

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2699
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Gunawan, Indra
Moritani, K
Isoda, Hiroshi
Mori, Takuro
Shinohara, M
Noda, T
Hosomi, R
Kurumada, Shinsuke
Makita, T
Publisher
IOP Publishing Ltd
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Keywords
Core Structure
Shaking Table
Joint
Wall-to-Foundation
Wall-to-Wall
Earthquake
Shear Force
Research Status
Complete
Series
IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering
Summary
In recent years, development of wood engineering is gradually increasing. Instead of using many wood columns, cross laminated timber is expected for constructing spacious open space building. Since cross-laminated timber has high rigidity and strength, cross-laminated timber is expected to be used as earthquake resistant wall or floor diaphragm that makes the span of building can be increased and the position of the wall can be adjusted openly. In order to optimize the performance of cross-laminated timber for open space building, original cross laminated timber core structure method was developed. In this paper, the development concept of original cross laminated timber core structure method will be explained. In this method, the joint connection for each element such as joint connection for wall-concrete foundation, wall-beam, and wall to hanging wall was also developed. The experiment to verify the strength and rigidity of each connection has been conducted and the result will be described. The shaking table experiment of 3-story open space building constructed by original cross laminated timber structure using varies earthquake waves was conducted. In this experiment natural period, shear force for each floor, story drift, and building response data is taken. The result shows the structure designed by original CLT core structure method is satisfy the requirement based on Japan cross-laminated panel structure regulation.
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7 records – page 1 of 1.