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Assessment of Disproportionate Collapse for Multi Storey Cross Laminated Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1664
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Mpidi Bita, Hercend
Currie, Neil
Tannert, Thomas
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Rotational Stiffness
Multi-Storey
Ductility
Loading
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 3725-3733
Summary
This paper investigates the risk of disproportionate collapse following extreme loading events. The methodology mimics a sudden removal of a loadbearing wall of a twelve-storey CLT building. The ductility-demand from the dynamic simulation is checked against the ductility supplied by the structural components and their connections. The analyses focus on rotational stiffness (k) of the joints by considering three different sub-structural idealisations according to the required modelling details and the feasibility of model reductions. To resist the imposed dynamic forces, the required k-values may be too large to be practically achieved by means of off-the-shelf brackets and screw connections. Improved structural detailing as well as adequate thickness of structural elements need to be considered in order to reduce the probability of disproportionate collapse.
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Assessment of Dynamic Characteristics of Multi-Storey Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1786
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Hummel, Johannes
Seim, Werner
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Keywords
Natural Frequency
Multi-Storey
Force-Based Design
Stiffness
Deformation
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 5819-5828
Summary
This paper discusses the impact of the natural frequency of multi-storey timber structures, focusing on force-based seismic design. Simplified approaches to determine the frequency of light-frame and cross-laminated timber structures are investigated. How stiffness parameters for simple two-dimensional analysis models can be derived from the different contributions of deformation...
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Bamboo Reinforced Glulam Beams: An Alternative to CFRP Reinforced Glulam Beams

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue640
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Author
Echavarria, Cesar
Echavarría, Beatriz
Cañola, Hernán
Publisher
Scientific.net
Year of Publication
2013
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Bamboo
CFRP
Load-Deformation
Reinforcement
Stiffness
Strength
Research Status
Complete
Series
Advanced Materials Research
Summary
A research study was undertaken to investigate the mechanical performance of glulam beams reinforced by CFRP or bamboo. Local reinforcement is proposed in order to improve the flexural strength of glulam beams. The glulam beam is strengthened in tension and along its sides with the carbon fiber-reinforced polymer CFRP or bamboo. A series of CFRP reinforced glulam beams and bamboo reinforced glulam beams were tested to determine their load-deformation characteristics. Experimental work for evaluating the reinforcing technique is reported here. According to experiment results, the CFRP and bamboo reinforcements led to a higher glulam beam performance. By using CFRP and bamboo reinforcements several improvements in strength may be obtained.
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Behavior of Cross-Laminated Timber Diaphragm Connections with Self-Tapping Screws

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1288
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Sullivan, Kyle
Miller, Thomas
Gupta, Rakesh
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Keywords
Seismic Force Resisting System
Monotonic Tests
Cyclic Tests
Strength
Stiffness
Shear Connections
Self-Tapping Screws
Research Status
Complete
Series
Engineering Structures
Summary
Monotonic and cyclic tests were carried out to determine strength and stiffness characteristics of 2.44 m (8 ft) long shear connections with 8 mm and 10 mm diameter self-tapping screws. The goal of this research is tocompare test values of cross-laminated timber (CLT) diaphragm connections in seismic force-resisting systems tothe design values calculated from formulas in the National Design Specification for Wood Construction (USA)and the Eurocode. Understanding and quantifying the behavior of these shear connections will provide structural engineers with increased confidence in designing these components, especially with regard to the seismic forceresisting systems. Ratios of the experimental yield strength (from the yield point on the load-deflection curve) to factored design strength were in the range of 2.1–6.1. In the ASCE 41-13 acceptance criteria analysis, the mfactors for the Life Safety performance level in cyclic tests ranged from 1.6 to 1.8 for surface spline connections and from 0.9 to 1.7 for cyclic half-lap connections. The half-lap connections with a unique combination of angled and vertical screws performed exceptionally well with both high, linear elastic initial stiffness and ductile, postpeak behavior.
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Behavior of Cross-Laminated Timber Diaphragm Panel-to-Panel Connections with Self-Tapping Screws

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1422
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Sullivan, Kyle
Organization
Oregon State University
Year of Publication
2017
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Lateral Load Resisting System
Monotonic Tests
Cyclic Tests
Strength
Stiffness
Self-Tapping Screws
International Building Code
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The goal of this project is to contribute to the development of design values for cross-laminated timber (CLT) diaphragms in the seismic load-resisting system for buildings. Monotonic and cyclic tests to determine strength and stiffness characteristics of 2.44 m (8 ft) long shear connections with common self-tapping screws were performed. Understanding and quantifying the behavior of these shear connections will aid in developing design provisions in the National Design Specification for Wood Construction and the International Building Code so structural engineers can use CLT more confidently in lateral force-resisting systems and extend the heights of wood buildings. Experimental strength-to-design strength ratios were in the range of 2.1 to 8.7. In the ASCE 41 acceptance criteria analysis, the m-factors for the Life Safety performance level in cyclic tests ranged from 1.6 to 1.8 for surface spline connections and from 0.9 to 1.7 for cyclic half-lap connections. The half-lap connections, where screws were installed in withdrawal, shear, shear, and withdrawal, performed exceptionally well with both high, linear-elastic, initial stiffness, and ductile, post-peak behavior.
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Behavior of cross-laminated timber panels during and after an ISO-fire: An experimental analysis

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3343
Year of Publication
2023
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Vairo, Maurizio
Silva, Valdir Pignatta
Icimoto, Felipe Hideyoshi
Organization
University of Sao Paulo
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2023
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Charring
ISO-fire
Post-fire Stiffness Reduction
Cooling Phase
Finite Element Analysis
Research Status
Complete
Series
Results in Engineering
Summary
Cross-laminated timber has been used in buildings since the 1990s. In the last years, there has been a growing interest in the use of this technology, especially with the adoption of the product in increasingly taller buildings. Considering that the product is manufactured from a combustible material, wood, authorities that regulate the fire safety in buildings and the scientific community have carried out numerous research and fire tests, aiming to elaborate codes which contemplate the use of cross-laminated timber in tall buildings. This paper discusses the main results obtained from the fire resistance test of a cross-laminated timber slab carried out in the horizontal gas furnace (3.0 m × 4.0 m x 1.5 m) from the University of Sao Paulo. A vertical load of 3 kN/m2 was applied over the slab and the specimens were exposed to the standard fire curve for 30 min. In addition to the 30-min test, the research also evaluated the thermal behavior of the samples during the 24 h after the burners were turned off. Throughout the test, the slab maintained the integrity and the thermal insulation, and no falling-off of the charred layer was observed. However, the 24-h test indicated that it is mandatory to consider the loss of stiffness and strength of timber caused by the thermal wave observed during the decay phase.
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Behaviour of Mass Timber Panel-Concrete Connections with Inclined Self-Tapping Screws and Insulation Layer

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1984
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Abdul Hamid Mirdad, Md
Chui, Ying Hei
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Keywords
Self-Tapping Screws
Insulation
Mid-Rise
High-Rise
Stiffness
Strength
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The Mass Timber Panel-Concrete (MTPC) composite floor system considered in this paper consists of a Mass Timber Panel (MTP) connected to reinforced concrete slab with Self-Tapping Screw (STS) connector and a sound insulation layer in between. This type of composite floor system is intended for mid- to high-rise building applications. Two types of MTPs with normal weight concrete, two insulation thicknesses, two screw embedment lengths and two screw angles were investigated through connection tests to characterize connection stiffness and strength. The main goal of this connection test program was to provide preliminary test data to assist in the development of a model to predict connections lateral stiffness and strength under consideration of insulation thickness, screw angle, withdrawal and embedment properties of screws in MTP. Connection test results show that screws at an insertion angle of 30° have a higher stiffness and strength along with a larger embedment length compared to the screws at a 45° angle and smaller embedment length. Stiffness seemed to be more susceptible to the influence of presence of insulation compared to strength with 40-65% reduction of stiffness and 10-20% reduction of strength were noticed for an insulation thickness of 5 mm. Screws in CLT showed higher strength while screws in CLP showed higher stiffness but the difference is insignificant.
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Behaviour of Mechanically Laminated CLT Members

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue291
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Kuklík, Petr
Velebil, Lukáš
Publisher
IOP Publishing Ltd
Year of Publication
2015
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Shear Stress
Torsional Stiffness
Slip Modulus
Lamination
Conference
International Conference on Innovative Materials, Structures and Technologies
Research Status
Complete
Notes
September 30-October 2 2015, Riga, Latvia
Summary
Cross laminated timber (CLT) is one of the structural building systems based on the lamination of multiple layers, where each layer is oriented perpendicularly to each other. Recent requirements are placed to develop an alternative process based on the mechanical lamination of the layers, which is of particular interest to our research group at the University Centre for Energy Efficient Buildings. The goal is to develop and verify the behaviour of mechanically laminated CLT wall panels exposed to shear stresses in the plane. The shear resistance of mechanically jointed CLT is ensured by connecting the layers by screws. The paper deals with the experimental analysis focused on the determination of the torsional stiffness and the slip modulus of crossing areas for different numbers of orthogonally connected layers. The results of the experiments were compared with the current analytical model.
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Bending Behavior of Regularly Spaced CLT Panels

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1616
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Franzoni, Lorenzo
Lebée, Arthur
Lyon, Florent
Forêt, Gilles
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
FEM
Bending Stiffness
Shear Stiffness
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 2368-2376
Summary
A regular alternation of lamellas and voids filled by insulating material within each layer of CLT can lead to cellular panels with improved acoustical, thermal and fire performance. In order to support the development of these innovative and lighter engineered wood products, their mechanical behavior is investigated in this paper by means of experiments and modeling. First, an experimental campaign on spaced CLT panels and related results are presented. Then, both simplified and refined modelings are applied. The chosen accurate modeling is a periodic homogenization scheme handled by a plate theory [1] and based on unit-cell strain energy computation with FEM. It appears that the simplified approach can predict the bending stiffness (EI) of CLT panels with large voids but not their transverse shear stiffness (GA) which can be precisely predicted with the more refined modeling. Finally, the influence of several panel’s parameters on the mechanical response is pointed out as well.
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Bending Capacity of Orthogonal and Parallel Glulam T-section Beams

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2476
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Bridges and Spans
Author
Wang, Jiejun
Yang, Tao
Ning, Fan
Rao, Zhenyu
Organization
Central South University of Forestry and Technology
Publisher
Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Institute of Technology (EMaTTech)
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Bridges and Spans
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Bearing Capacity
Stiffness
Integrity
Strain
Deflection
Ultimate Bearing Capacity
Shear Strength
Finite Element Model
Displacement
Failure Mechanism
Ductility
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Engineering Science and Technology Review
Summary
The bridge deck slab and the rectangular beam of the glued-wood beam bridge are connected by bolts and studs; thus, the joint surface is prone to slippage, and the beams and plates experience difficulty in bearing loadings together. This difficulty results in problems, such as stress concentration and screw corrosion and loosening, and weakens structural bearing capacity, stiffness, and integrity. In this study, an experimental model of glued timber T-section beams formed by gluing between bridge decks and rectangular beams and a calculation method for T-beam shear stress were proposed to improve the bearing capacity, stiffness, and integrity of the structure for ensuring that the bridge deck and the rectangular beam jointly bear stress. Three sets of beams, namely orthogonal T-beams, parallel T-beams, and rectangular beams were made using Larix gmelinii larch boards and structural glue to perform static bending bearing capacity test for examining the strain, deflection, and ultimate bearing capacity of the members and observe the destruction pattern. During the test, the bending shear strength was calculated following the principle of equivalent stiffness and the shear strength formula proposed by Rammer. Furthermore, a finite element model of glulam beams based on elastoplastic theory was established using structural analysis software. The displacement, strain, and failure mechanism of the members under the test loads were simulated and analysed using the model to verify the test results. Results demonstrate that, when the three types of beams are bent, they are sheared along the grain near the central axis of the section. The bonding surface between the wing plate and rib of the T-beam is undamaged, and the bonding is reliable with strong structural integrity. Compared with those of rectangular beams, the bearing capacity (limit load), bending stiffness, and ductility coefficient of the parallel T-beams are increased by 71%, 189%, and 23%, respectively. Compared with those of rectangular beams, the bearing capacity, bending stiffness, and ductility coefficient of the orthogonal T-beams are increased by 33%, 28%, and 25%, respectively. Compared with those of rectangular beams, the bearing capacity, bending stiffness, and ductility coefficient of the glulam T-beams are greatly improved. By considering the principle of equivalent stiffness and using the Rammer formula, the shear strength test values of orthogonal T-beams and rectangular beams of glulam deviate from the calculated values by 8.0% and -5.6%, respectively, which indicates good agreement. However, the shear strength test value of the parallel T-beams deviates from the calculated value by 19.2%, which indicates slightly lower calculation accuracy. The finite element analysis is consistent with the results of the experiment. This study provides certain references for the engineering design of glulam T-beams.
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216 records – page 2 of 22.