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21 records – page 1 of 3.

Behaviour of Mechanically Laminated CLT Members

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue291
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Kuklík, Petr
Velebil, Lukáš
Publisher
IOP Publishing Ltd
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Latvia
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Shear Stress
Torsional Stiffness
Slip Modulus
Lamination
Language
English
Conference
International Conference on Innovative Materials, Structures and Technologies
Research Status
Complete
Notes
September 30-October 2 2015, Riga, Latvia
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Cyclic Response of Insulated Steel Angle Brackets Used for Cross-Laminated Timber Connections

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2765
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Seismic
Acoustics and Vibration
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Author
Kržan, Meta
Azinovic, Boris
Publisher
Springer
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Topic
Seismic
Acoustics and Vibration
Connections
Keywords
Angle Bracket
Sound Insulation
Insulation
Monotonic Test
Cyclic Tests
Wall-to-Floor
Stiffness
Load Bearing Capacity
Shear
Tensile
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
European Journal of Wood and Wood Products
Summary
In cross-laminated timber (CLT) buildings, in order to reduce the disturbing transmission of sound over the flanking parts, special insulation layers are used between the CLT walls and slabs, together with insulated angle-bracket connections. However, the influence of such CLT connections and insulation layers on the seismic resistance of CLT structures has not yet been studied. In this paper, experimental investigation on CLT panels installed on insulation bedding and fastened to the CLT floor using an innovative, insulated, steel angle bracket, are presented. The novelty of the investigated angle-bracket connection is, in addition to the sound insulation, its resistance to both shear as well as uplift forces as it is intended to be used instead of traditional angle brackets and hold-down connections to simplify the construction. Therefore, monotonic and cyclic tests on the CLT wall-to-floor connections were performed in shear and tensile/compressive load direction. Specimens with and without insulation under the angle bracket and between the CLT panels were studied and compared. Tests of insulated specimens have proved that the insulation has a marginal influence on the load-bearing capacity; however, it significantly influences the stiffness characteristics. In general, the experiments have shown that the connection could also be used for seismic resistant CLT structures, although some minor improvements should be made.
Online Access
Free
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Developing Seismic Performance Factors for Cross Laminated Timber in the United States

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue124
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
van de Lindt, John
Amini, M. Omar
Rammer, Douglas
Line, Philip
Pei, Shiling
Popovski, Marjan
Organization
Canadian Association for Earthquake Engineering
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Keywords
Angle Bracket
Shear Test
Strength
Stiffness
Uplift Test
US
Language
English
Conference
The 11th Canadian Conference on Earthquake Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
July 21-24, 2015, Victoria, BC, Canada
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Development of Mass Timber Wall System Based on Nail Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2526
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Zhang, Chao
Lee, George
Lam, Frank
Organization
Timber Engineering and Applied Mechanics (TEAM) Laboratory
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Shear
Stiffness
Fasteners
Fastener Type
Load
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This project studied the feasibility and performance of a mass timber wall system based on Nail Laminated Timber (NLT) for floor/wall applications, in order to quantify the effects of various design parameters. Thirteen 2.4 m × 2.4 m shear walls were manufactured and tested in this phase. Together with another five specimens tested before, a total eighteen shear wall specimens and ten configurations were investigated. The design variables included fastener type, sheathing thickness, number of sheathings, sheathing material, nailing pattern, wall opening, and lumber orientation. The NLT walls were made of SprucePine-Fir (SPF) No. 2 2×4 (38 mm × 89 mm) lumber and Oriented Strand Lumber (OSB) or plywood sheathing. They were tested under monotonic and reverse-cyclic loading protocols, in accordance with ASTM E564-06 (2018) and ASTM E2126-19, respectively. Compared to traditional wood stud walls, the best performing NLT based shear wall had 2.5 times the peak load and 2 times the stiffness at 0.5-1.5% drift, while retaining high ductility. The advantage of these NLT-based wall was even greater under reverse-cyclic loading due to the internal energy dissipation of NLT. The wall with ring nails had higher stiffness than the one with smooth nails. But the performance of ring nails deteriorated drastically under reverse-cyclic loading, leading to a considerably lower capacity. Changing the sheathing thickness from 11 mm to 15 mm improved the strength by 6% while having the same initial stiffness. Adding one more face of sheathing increased the peak load and stiffness by at least 50%. The wall was also very ductile as the load dropped less than 10% when the lateral displacement exceeded 150 mm. The difference created by sheathing material was not significant if they were of the same thickness. Reducing the nailing spacing by half led to a 40% increasing in the peak load and stiffness. Having an opening of 25% of the area at the center, the lateral capacity and stiffness reached 75% or more of the full wall. A simplified method to estimate the lateral resistance of this mass timber wall system was proposed. The estimate was close to the tested capacity and was on the conservative side. Recommendations for design and manufacturing the system were also presented.
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Free
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Elastic Response of Cross-Laminated Engineered Bamboo Panels Subjected to In-Plane Loading

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2305
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Other Materials
Application
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Author
Archila-Santos, Hector
Rhead, Andrew
Publisher
ICE Publishing
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
United Kingdom
Format
Journal Article
Material
Other Materials
Application
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
G-XLam
Panels
Strength
Stiffness
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Construction Materials
ISSN
1747-650X
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Elevated Temperature Effects on the Shear Performance of a Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) Wall-to-Floor Bracket Connection

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2106
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Fire
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors

Experimental Investigation of Self-Centering Cross Laminated Timber Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1654
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Ganey, Ryan
Berman, Jeffrey
Yao, Lihong
Dolan, Daniel
Akbas, Tugce
Loftus, Sara
Sause, Richard
Ricles, James
Pei, Shiling
van de Lindt, John
Blomgren, Hans-Erik
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Lateral Load Resisting System
Post-Tensioning
U-Shaped Flexural Plates
Limit States
Self-Centering
Strength
Stiffness
Interstory Drifts
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 3547-3554
Summary
This paper describes experiments conducted to develop a resilient lateral force resisting wall system that combines cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels with vertical post-tensioning (PT) to provide post-event re-centering. Supplemental mild steel U-shaped flexural plate devices (UFPs) are intended to yield under cyclic loading while the PT...
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Free
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Higher Mode Effects in Multi-Storey Timber Buildings with Varying Diaphragm Flexibility

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1480
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Walls
Author
Moroder, Daniel
Sarti, Francesco
Pampanin, Stefano
Smith, Tobias
Buchanan, Andrew
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
New Zealand
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Walls
Topic
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Nonlinear Time History Analysis
Higher Mode Effects
Stiffness
Diaphragms
Inter-Story Drift
Language
English
Conference
New Zealand Society for Earthquake Engineering Conference
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 27-29, 2017, Wellington, New Zealand
Summary
With the increasing acceptance and popularity of multi-storey timber buildings up to 10 storeys and beyond, the influence of higher mode effects and diaphragm stiffness cannot be overlooked in design. Due to the lower stiffness of timber lateral load resisting systems compared with traditional construction materials, the effect...
Online Access
Free
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Influence of Openings on the Shear Strength and Stiffness of Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) Panels

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2710
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Shear Walls
Author
Aljuhmani, Ahmad
Ogasawawra, A.
Atsuzawa, E.
Alwashali, Hamood
Shegay, A. V.
Tafheem, Zasiah
Maeda, Masaki
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Shear Walls
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Diagonal Compression Test
Openings
Lateral Strength
In-Plane Shear Stiffness
Panels
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Earthquake Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Summary
In the last decade, cross laminated timber (CLT) has been receiving increasing attention as a promising construction material for multi-storey structures in areas of high seismicity. In Japan, application of CLT in building construction is still relatively new; however, there is increasing interest in CLT from researchers as well as construction companies. Furthermore, the Japanese government is providing construction cost subsidies for new CLT structures as it is a carbon neutral and sustainable material. The high shear and compressive strength of CLT makes it a good candidate for use as shear walls in mid-rise buildings. One important aspect of CLT walls, and one that is presently poorly understood, is the influence of openings on the shear carrying capacity. Openings are often necessary in CLT panels either in form of windows, doors, lift shaft openings or installation of building services. Concerning this aspect, the code regulations in Japan are relatively strict, such that if openings exceeded certain prescribed limits, the entire CLT panel is considered as a non-structural element, and its contribution to lateral strength is totally ignored. Furthermore, as the maximum opening size is usually governed by edge distance constraints, the size of openings that designers can use is inevitably limited by the standard sizes supplied by the manufacturers. As a result, designers are obligated to adopt very small opening size. This is thought to be a very conservative approach. The main purpose of this paper is to experimentally evaluate the influence of openings on seismic capacity; strength and stiffness reduction, as well as failure mode with changing opening size and opening aspect ratio. In addition, check the validity of the Japanese code regulations with regards to openings in CLT panels. In this study, six 5-layer CLT panels containing different openings were tested. The parameters considered include the size and layout of the opening. The panels were specifically designed with openings that would render them ineffective in resisting lateral loads according to the Japanese standard. However, in addition to the six panels, one panel without openings and one panel with openings that meet the Japanese standard was designed. All the CLT panels were tested in uniaxial diagonal compression in order to simulate pure shear loading. The CLT panels and the loading setup were designed such that the resulting failure mode will be governed by a shear mechanism. The main focus of the experiment was to relate the deterioration of the lateral strength and stiffness of the panels to the size and layout of the opening. The results showed that the panels with openings with the same area have relatively different failure direction and reduction factors for panel shear strength and stiffness, and that is due to the shear weak and strong direction that CLT panels have. Also, the effect of openings on the reduction of stiffness for CLT panels was found to be greater than their effect on the reduction of shear strength. The prescribed equation in the Japanese CLT Guidebook underpredicts stiffness reduction, and has discrepancies with regard to strength as the difference of panel strengths in weak and strong directions are not considered.
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Free
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In-plane Shear Modulus of Cross-laminated Timber by Diagonal Compression Test

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2420
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Walls
Beams
Floors

21 records – page 1 of 3.