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203 records – page 1 of 21.

Cyclic Response of Insulated Steel Angle Brackets Used for Cross-Laminated Timber Connections

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2765
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Seismic
Acoustics and Vibration
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Author
Kržan, Meta
Azinovic, Boris
Publisher
Springer
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Topic
Seismic
Acoustics and Vibration
Connections
Keywords
Angle Bracket
Sound Insulation
Insulation
Monotonic Test
Cyclic Tests
Wall-to-Floor
Stiffness
Load Bearing Capacity
Shear
Tensile
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
European Journal of Wood and Wood Products
Summary
In cross-laminated timber (CLT) buildings, in order to reduce the disturbing transmission of sound over the flanking parts, special insulation layers are used between the CLT walls and slabs, together with insulated angle-bracket connections. However, the influence of such CLT connections and insulation layers on the seismic resistance of CLT structures has not yet been studied. In this paper, experimental investigation on CLT panels installed on insulation bedding and fastened to the CLT floor using an innovative, insulated, steel angle bracket, are presented. The novelty of the investigated angle-bracket connection is, in addition to the sound insulation, its resistance to both shear as well as uplift forces as it is intended to be used instead of traditional angle brackets and hold-down connections to simplify the construction. Therefore, monotonic and cyclic tests on the CLT wall-to-floor connections were performed in shear and tensile/compressive load direction. Specimens with and without insulation under the angle bracket and between the CLT panels were studied and compared. Tests of insulated specimens have proved that the insulation has a marginal influence on the load-bearing capacity; however, it significantly influences the stiffness characteristics. In general, the experiments have shown that the connection could also be used for seismic resistant CLT structures, although some minor improvements should be made.
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Timber-Concrete Composite: An Alternative Composite Floor System

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2749
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Collins, Leah
Publisher
Kansas State University
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Thesis
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Strength
Stiffness
Connections
Fasteners
Bending Stiffness
Stress
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The desire for sustainability has propelled innovation in structural engineering for much of the 21st century. Implement sustainable design without sacrificing the structural integrity of a building is important. The timber-concrete composite (TCC) floor system is an alternative floor system that offers superior sustainability and quick installation compared to other composite floors. TCC is comprised of a reinforced concrete slab connected to timber plate/beams by shear connectors that transfer the internal forces through the shear flow. To resist bending forces the reinforced concrete slab experiences the majority of compression stress and the timber plate/beam experience the majority of tension stress. Compared to an equivalent all-concrete section the TCC system has similar strength and stiffness as well as reduced weight.
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Development of Mass Timber Wall System Based on Nail Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2526
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Zhang, Chao
Lee, George
Lam, Frank
Organization
Timber Engineering and Applied Mechanics (TEAM) Laboratory
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Shear
Stiffness
Fasteners
Fastener Type
Load
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This project studied the feasibility and performance of a mass timber wall system based on Nail Laminated Timber (NLT) for floor/wall applications, in order to quantify the effects of various design parameters. Thirteen 2.4 m × 2.4 m shear walls were manufactured and tested in this phase. Together with another five specimens tested before, a total eighteen shear wall specimens and ten configurations were investigated. The design variables included fastener type, sheathing thickness, number of sheathings, sheathing material, nailing pattern, wall opening, and lumber orientation. The NLT walls were made of SprucePine-Fir (SPF) No. 2 2×4 (38 mm × 89 mm) lumber and Oriented Strand Lumber (OSB) or plywood sheathing. They were tested under monotonic and reverse-cyclic loading protocols, in accordance with ASTM E564-06 (2018) and ASTM E2126-19, respectively. Compared to traditional wood stud walls, the best performing NLT based shear wall had 2.5 times the peak load and 2 times the stiffness at 0.5-1.5% drift, while retaining high ductility. The advantage of these NLT-based wall was even greater under reverse-cyclic loading due to the internal energy dissipation of NLT. The wall with ring nails had higher stiffness than the one with smooth nails. But the performance of ring nails deteriorated drastically under reverse-cyclic loading, leading to a considerably lower capacity. Changing the sheathing thickness from 11 mm to 15 mm improved the strength by 6% while having the same initial stiffness. Adding one more face of sheathing increased the peak load and stiffness by at least 50%. The wall was also very ductile as the load dropped less than 10% when the lateral displacement exceeded 150 mm. The difference created by sheathing material was not significant if they were of the same thickness. Reducing the nailing spacing by half led to a 40% increasing in the peak load and stiffness. Having an opening of 25% of the area at the center, the lateral capacity and stiffness reached 75% or more of the full wall. A simplified method to estimate the lateral resistance of this mass timber wall system was proposed. The estimate was close to the tested capacity and was on the conservative side. Recommendations for design and manufacturing the system were also presented.
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Effect of Design Parameters on Mass Timber Floor Vibration Performance

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2683
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Design and Systems
Material
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Hu, Lin
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Design and Systems
Keywords
Concrete Topping
Plywood
Vibration Performance
Bending Stiffness
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Mass timber is a generic name for a broad range of thick and heavy wood products such as cross-laminated timber (CLT), dowel-laminated timber (DLT), nail-laminated timber (NLT), and gluelaminated timber (GLT), among others. So far, vibration-controlled design methods have been developed mostly for CLT floors.
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Effet des Paramètres de Conception Sur la Performance Vibratoire des Planchers Massifs en Bois

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2684
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Energy Performance
Material
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Hu, Lin
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Energy Performance
Keywords
Concrete Topping
Plywood
Vibration Performance
Bending Stiffness
Language
French
Research Status
Complete
Summary
La construction massive en bois est un terme générique qui englobe une grande variété de produits du bois épais et lourds, notamment le bois lamellé-croisé (CLT), le bois lamellé-goujonné (DLT), le bois lamellé-cloué et le bois lamellé-collé (GLT). À ce jour, les méthodes de conception à vibrations contrôlées ont surtout été élaborées pour les planchers en CLT.
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Experimental Research on Structural Behaviors of Glulam I-Beam with a Special-Shaped Section

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2447
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Author
Yang, Ruyuan
Hong, Chaokun
Zhang, Xiaofeng
Yuan, Quan
Sun, Youfu
Publisher
Tech Science Press
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Flange Thickness
Shear Pan Ratio
Stiffener
Stiffness
Bending
Failure
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Renewable Materials
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Flexural Strengthening of Composite Bridge Glued Laminated Timber Beams-Concrete Plate Using CFRP Layers

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2587
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Bridges and Spans
Author
Mujiman, M
Igustiany, F
Hakiki, R
Publisher
IOP Publishing Ltd
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Bridges and Spans
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
CFRP
Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer
Flexural Strength
Stiffness
Ductility
Reinforcement
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering
Summary
The timber bridge design although economical, often has difficulty producing enough rigidity so that a solution is needed to solve it. The use of CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer) as a reinforcement of structural elements if properly designed and implemented can produce an effective and efficient composite structure. The experimental study aims to analyse the strength, stiffness and ductility of flexural strengthening composite bridge glued laminated timber beams-concrete plates using CFRP layers. The dimensions of the composite glued laminated timber beams 100/180 mm and concrete plate 75/300 mm with a length of 2,480 mm. The number of specimens is 3 composite glued laminated timber beams-concrete plate consisting of 1 test beam without CFRP reinforcement, 1 test beam with one layer CFRP reinforcement, and 1 test beam with three layer CFRP reinforcement. Experimental testing of flexural loads is done with two load points where each load is placed at 1/3 span length. The test results show that the strength of composite laminated timber beams glued - concrete plates BN; BL-1; BL-2 in a row 81.32; 82.82; 82.69 kN/mm; stiffness in a row 7.51; 8.22; 6.32 kN/mm and successive ductility of 16.67; 28.83; 20.21.
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A Post-tensioned Cross-Laminated Timber Core for Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2700
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Cores
Walls
Author
Znabei, Tigist
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Cores
Walls
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Keywords
Prestress
Post-Tensioning
Bending
Shear Stiffness
Core Structure
Compressive Strength
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This master thesis is on post-tensioning cross-laminated timber stability cores for multiple story buildings. When designing a CLT core, significantly larger core sections will be needed than when designing a stabilizing core in concrete. This is for one part due to the limited stiffness of the CLT compared to concrete. For another part it is due to the limited stiffness of connectors in CLT. Sliding and uplift can occur in connections in CLT loaded in tension and shear respectively. The CLT panels behave like rigid bodies, with most of the displacement occurring at the connections. In addition, cooperation between flange and web may be limited, depending on the stiffness of the corner connection and the occurrence of shear lag. Post-tensioning is suggested as a solution to diminish uplift and sliding in the connectors. In this way, with the same core section, a taller building may be realized compared to the non-post-tensioned case. In the thesis also the long-term effects on the prestress level is assessed, as estimating these effects is important for the safety of the system.This thesis adds to the body of knowledge on post-tensioned CLT structures. Firstly, previous studies on post-tensioned CLT focus on individual shear walls and on seismic design situations. This thesis explores how beneficial post-tensioning is from the perspective of serviceability limit state governed design. Furthermore, though post-tensioning as a prestressing method has been applied often in concrete structures, prestressing of CLT is a novel research subject. Especially the estimation of long-term force loss is a topic that still requires research. This thesis provides the designer with a straightforward calculation method (using python) for estimation of prestress force loss in the long-term.The research was carried out with a literature study and a case-study. The literature research comprised of studies on structural design with CLT loaded in-plane; the effective flange of a CLT core; stiffness of connections in CLT; prestressing of CLT; a design approach for post-tensioning; time dependent losses in post-tensioned CLT. The case study was based on a fictitious floorplan including a “minimal core”, and at expressing the benefit of post-tensioning in terms of height gain.The degree to which the flange and the web cooperate showed highly dependent on the connection between flange and web and the core height. In the case study, the effective flange width showed to depend highly on the height of the core and the stiffness of the connection between flange and web.In the case-study, without post-tensioning, approximately half of the displacements could be attributed to the connections. With post-tensioning, the uplift and sliding displacements in the horizontal joints was eliminated. Consequently, the attainable height was significantly increased: from 5 storeys in the un-post-tensioned case, to 8 storeys in the post-tensioned case. Long-term effects on the prestress loss were considerable. In the case-study, approximately 40% loss of post-tension force in the lifetime of the building was predicted and included in the design. Largest causeof force loss was due to changes of moisture content during construction. The remaining lateral displacements after post-tensioning were due to bending and shear.Post-tensioning of CLT cores is a powerful method for reducing lateral displacements in cases where uplift and sliding are dominant contributors to the lateral displacements. This is especially the case in light-weight buildings. Uplift and sliding displacements can be eliminated altogether with post-tensioning. The designer should realize that post-tensioning does not increase the bending and shear stiffness of the core. The thesis also concludes that with the post-tensioning of CLT walls, the compressive strength of the CLT in the so-called “compression-toe” might be exceeded. It is an important check in design. Furthermore, depending on the decision to re-tighten the rods at some point or not, the post-tension force loss should be calculated and included in finding the right prestress level. For this estimation of the moisture level of the CLT proved to be an important but difficult step. It is likely that the 40% force loss in the case-study is on the conservative side, since a large change in moisture content has been assumed. In practice, the moisture content can be measured on site. This can help verify the assumptions on the moisture content used in force loss calculations. This can help in assuring the structure is safe in the long-term.
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Edge Connection Technology for Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) Floor Slabs Promoting Two-Way Action

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2718
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Asselstine, Julian
Publisher
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Connections
Keywords
Bending
Two-Way
Self-Tapping Screws
Stiffness
Modulus of Elasticity
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is a class of engineered wood product with the ability to act as a flat plate floor system transferring loads in two-directions due to the orthogonally crossed layers. Currently, dimensional limitations from manufacturing and transportation limit the minor span to about 3.0 m. This results in under utilization of the bending properties of the cross-layers or the choice of a different product because of the common use of one-way bending support conditions such as drop beams simply supporting the ends of the longer span. This study investigates the performance of a newly developed edge connection system to maintain continuity in the minor direction span of CLT and promote two-way bending action. Three connections utilizing a tension splice fastened to the underside of the panel edges with self-tapping screws are investigated, with experimental results showing promise to maintain a high level of stiffness. This connection system was placed in the maximum moment location of the minor span - attaining a connected span modulus of elasticity up to 1.17 times the intact span modulus of elasticity, indicating a reinforcing effect created by the connection. Further, the minor direction span is additionally stiffened through the use of parallel-strand lumber rim beams fixed to the edges of the CLT in the minor direction span and hidden within the cross-section of the CLT. ANSYS finite element modelling calibrated and validated from the experimental results show the potential of this flat-plate system using 5-layer CLT to reach column spacing of 6.0 m by 6.0 m limited by deflection under a serviceability limit state uniformly distributed load of 3.25 kPa. This claim maintains a high degree of conservatism, as the boundary stress obtained from the minimum observed failure load is greater than 6 times the maximum stress at an ultimate limit state load of 4.67 kPa. This system has the ability to expand the flexibility for designers to utilize CLT more efficiently and create large open floor spaces uninhibited by drop-beams.
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Prediction of Withdrawal Resistance for a Screw in Hybrid Cross-Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2687
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Pang, Sung-Jun
Ahn, Kyung-Sun
Kang, Seog Goo
Oh, Jung-Kwon
Publisher
SpringerOpen
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Self-Tapping Screws
Withdrawal Resistance
Screw
Withdrawal Stiffness
Withdrawal Strength
Connections
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Wood Science
Summary
The aim of this study was to predict the withdrawal resistance of a screw in hybrid cross-laminated timber (CLT) composed of two types of lamina layers. A theoretical model to predict the withdrawal resistance was developed from the shear mechanism between a screw and the layers in hybrid CLT. The parameters for the developed model were the withdrawal stiffness and strength that occurs when a screw is withdrawn, and the penetration depth of a screw in layers of a wood material. The prediction model was validated with an experimental test. Screws with two different diameters and lengths (Ø6.5 × 65 mm and Ø8.0 × 100 mm) were inserted in a panel composed of solid wood and plywood layers, and the withdrawal resistances of the screws were evaluated. At least 30 specimens for each group were tested to derive the lower 5th percentile values. As a result, the developed model predictions were 86–88% of the lower 5th percentile values of hybrid CLT from the properties of the lamina layer. This shows that the withdrawal resistance of hybrid CLT can be designed from the properties of its layer.
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203 records – page 1 of 21.