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Experimental Behavior of a Continuous Metal Connector for a Wood-Concrete Composite System

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue730
Year of Publication
2004
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Application
Floors
Author
Clouston, Peggi
Civjan, Scott
Bathon, Leander
Publisher
Forest Products Society
Year of Publication
2004
Format
Journal Article
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Pine
US
Continuous Steel Mesh
Steel Connectors
Push-Out Tests
Shear Strength
Stiffness
Bending Tests
Research Status
Complete
Series
Forest Products Journal
Summary
The benefits of using shear connectors to join wood beams to a concrete slab in a composite floor or deck system are many. Studies throughout the world have demonstrated significantly improved strength, stiffness, and ductility properties from such connection systems as well as citing practical building advantages such as durability, sound insulation, and fire resistance. In this study, one relatively new shear connector system that originated in Germany has been experimentally investigated for use with U.S. manufactured products. The connector system consists of a continuous steel mesh of which one half is glued into a southern pine Parallam® Parallel Strand Lumber beam and the other half embedded into a concrete slab to provide minimal interlayer slip. A variety of commercial epoxies were tested for shear strength and stiffness in standard shear or “push out” tests. The various epoxies resulted in a variety of shear constitutive behaviors; however, for two glue types,shear failure occurred in the steel connector resulting in relatively high initial stiffness and ductility as well as good repeatability. Slip moduli and ultimate strength values are presented and discussed. Full-scale bending tests, using the best performing adhesive as determined from the shear tests, were also conducted. Results indicate consistent, near-full composite action system behavior.
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Prediction of Dynamic Response of a 7-Storey Massive XLam Wooden Building Tested on a Shaking Table

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1885
Year of Publication
2010
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Dujic, Bruno
Žarnic, Roko
Pirmanšek, Klara
Ceccotti, Ario
Year of Publication
2010
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Multi-Storey
Full Scale Test
Blind Prediction
Static Analyses
Stiffness
Load Bearing
Mechanical Connectors
Dynamic Analysis
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
June 20-24, 2010, Riva del Garda, Italy
Summary
In October 2007 a series of seismic tests were carried out on a 7-storey building made of cross laminated (XLam) wooden panels in natural scale on a shaking table E-Defence in Japan within the SOFIE project. The paper presents calculation procedure, prediction of dynamic behaviour of the tested structure excited by the earthquake record "Kobe JMA 1995" and comparison between predicted, that means calculated and measured response. Due to blind prediction approach some construction details were not known before dynamic time history response calculation. Therefore some assumptions, engineering judgment and rough static analyses were needed to define all construction parts which were in modelling approach assumed as important and could have had influence on dynamic response of the analyzed structure. The most important assumptions related to the definition of the stiffness and load bearing capacity of mechanical connections, types of anchors and their positions in each floor level, were determined on the basis of static analysis where the structure was loaded with equivalent horizontal seismic forces and then were used in dynamic analysis. A mathematical model was developed in program SAP2000 where modal and time history analyses were carried out. Comparison of calculated and measured results is described and evaluated on the basis of the model assumptions and its simplification.
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Structural Performance of Box Based Cross Laminated Timber System Used in Floor Applications

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1171
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Chen, Yue
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2011
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Three Point Bending Test
Vertical Deflection
Bending Stiffness
Fundamental Frequency
Finite Element Analysis
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The current outbreak of Mountain Pine Beetle (MPB) in the province of British Columbia (B.C.) is the most extensive disturbance event occurring in North American forests in recorded history. The concept of converting the beetle killed wood into engineered wood products by defect removal and reconstitution is employed to maximize value recovery from the material. Cross Laminated Timber (CLT), which is produced in modular form and can be utilized as part of a structural system for floor, wall or roof elements, is considered as an excellent application of the concept. CLT originates from Europe. Such products have been developed as a proprietary product by individual companies aimed at servicing specific markets. There is a need to investigate different ways of making CLT and to define its structural performance suitable for North America. The main focus of this study is to investigate the structural performance of box based CLT system used in floor applications. Comprehensive three dimensional finite element models, which can be used to analyze the mechanical and vibration behavior of the plate and box type structures, were developed. Four prototype box elements, each having five replicates, were designed and manufactured locally. Third point bending tests were conducted on the specimens in the Timber Engineering and Applied Mechanics (TEAM) Laboratory at the University of British Columbia. The numerical analysis agreed well with experimental data in terms of vertical deflection and bending stiffness. Vibration, which is critical to floor serviceability, was also studied. Three types of excitation were applied to measure the fundamental frequency of the twenty specimens. Finite element analysis provided good predictions of fundamental frequency values comparing to the experimental results. A local built demonstration building, L41home, was presented and analyzed as an example using the tools developed in this study for CLT applications. As a pioneer research of CLT materials in North America, this work has contributed to the understanding of the structural performance of floor systems using CLT panels for the commercial and residential applications.
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Investigating the Performance of Wood Portal Frames as Alternative Bracing Systems in Light-Frame Wood Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2240
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
Application
Frames
Author
Al Mamun, Abdullah
Organization
University of Ottawa
Year of Publication
2012
Format
Thesis
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
Application
Frames
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Portal Frames
Shear Walls
FE model
Moment Capacity
Stiffness
Lateral Load
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Light-frame shearwall assemblies have been successfully used to resist gravity and lateral loads, such as earthquake and wind, for many decades. However, there is a need for maintaining the structural integrity of such buildings even when large openings in walls are introduced. Wood portal frame systems have been identified as a potential alternative to meet some aspects of this construction demand. The overarching goal of the research is to develop wood portal frame bracing systems, which can be used as an alternative or in combination with light-frame wood shearwalls. This is done through investigating the behavior of wood portal frames using the MIDPLY shearwall framing technique. A total of 21 MIDPLY corner joint tests were conducted with varying bracing details. Also, a finite element model was developed and compared with test results from the current study as well as studies by others. It was concluded from the corner joint tests that the maximum moment resistance increased with the addition of metal straps or exterior sheathings. The test results also showed a significant increase in the moment capacity and rotational stiffness by replacing the Spruce-Pine Fir (SPF), header with the Laminated Veneer Lumber (LVL) header. The addition of the FRP to the standard wall configuration also resulted in a significant increase in the moment capacity. However, no significant effect was observed on the stiffness properties of the corner joint. The FE model was capable of predicting the behavior of the corner joints and the full-scale portal frames with realistic end-conditions. The model closely predicted the ultimate lateral capacity for all the configurations but more uncertainty was found in predicting the initial stiffness.The FE model used to estimate the behavior of the full-scale portal frames constructed using the MIDPLY framing techniques showed a significant increase in the lateral load carrying capacity when compared with the traditional portal frame. It was also predicted using the full-scale FE model that the lateral load carrying capacity of the MIDPLY portal frame would increase with the addition of the metal straps on exterior faces. A parametric study showed that using a Laminated Strand Lumber (LSL) header increased the lateral load carrying capacity and the initial stiffness of the frames relative to the SPF header. The study also showed that there was an increase in the capacity if high strength metal straps were used. Doubling of the nail spacing at header and braced wall segment had a considerable effect on the lateral capacity of portal frame. Also, the initial stiffness was reduced for all the configurations with the doubling of the nail spacing at the header and braced wall segment in comparison with the reference frame.
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The Design of a Semi-Prefabricated LVL-Concrete Composite Floor

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue103
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Yeoh, David
Fragiacomo, Massimo
Publisher
Hindawi Publishing Corporation
Year of Publication
2012
Format
Journal Article
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Flexural Stiffness Method
Prefabrication
Research Status
Complete
Series
Advances in Civil Engineering
Summary
This paper describes the design of a novel semi-prefabricated LVL-concrete composite floor that has been developed in New Zealand. In this solution, the floor units made from LVL joists and plywood are prefabricated in the factory and transported to the building site. The units are then lifted onto the supports and connected to the main frames of the building and to the adjacent units. Finally, a concrete topping is poured on top of the units in order to form a continuous slab connecting all the units. Rectangular notches cut from the LVL joists and reinforced with coach screws provide the composite action between the concrete slab and the LVL joists. This system proved to be an effective modular solution that ensures rapid construction. A design procedure based on the use of the effective flexural stiffness method, also known as the “gamma method” is proposed for the design of the composite floor at ultimate and serviceability limit states, in the short and long term. By comparison with the experimental results, it is shown that the proposed method leads to conservative design. A step-by-step design worked example of this novel semi-prefabricated composite floor concludes the paper.
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Wood-Steel Hybrid Seismic Force Resisting Systems: Seismic Ductility

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue330
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Dickof, Carla
Stiemer, Siegfried
Tesfamariam, Solomon
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2012
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Timber-Steel Hybrid
Overstrength
Ductility
Stiffness
Seismic Force Resisting System
Pushover Response
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
July 15-19, 2012, Auckland, New Zealand
Summary
North American building codes currently provide strict limits on height of wood structures, where for example, in Canada wood structures are limited to 4 or 5 storeys. This paper examines wood-steel hybrid system to increase seismic force resistance beyond current limits, up to 10 storeys. The use wood-steel hybrid systems allows for the combination of high strength and ductility of steel with high stiffness and light weight of timber. This paper examines one type o wood and steel hybrid system: a steel moment frame with infill crossed Laminated Timber (CLT) shear walls. A detailed non-linear model of a 2D wood-steel hybrid seismic force resisting system was completed for 6, and 9 storeys; with two different steel frame designs, and four different placements of the infill walls. The static pushover response of this type of hybrid seismic force resisting system (SFRS) has been completed and compared for all cases. The results indicate that preliminary values for ductility (Rd) and overstrength (Ro) for this type of system are 2.0 and 1.7, respectively, similar to a plain wood wall system. Low ductility frames benefit the most from the addition of CLT shear walls as they do not lose the ductility in the system.
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Experimental Testing of Hold Down Devices for Timber Frame Shear Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue401
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Connections
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Caprolu, Giuseppe
Organization
Luleå University of Technology
Year of Publication
2012
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Connections
Keywords
Hold-Down
Strength
Stiffness
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Källsner and Girhammar have presented a new plastic design method for wood-framed shear walls at ultimate limit state. This method allows the designer to calculate the load-carrying capacity of partially anchored shear walls, where the leading stud is not anchored against uplift. The anchorage system of shear walls is provided by anchor bolts in the bottom rail and hold downs at the leading stud. Anchor bolts provide horizontal shear continuity between the bottom rail and the foundation. Hold downs are directly connecting the vertical leading stud to the foundation. Sometimes hold downs are not provided and only the bottom rail is anchored to the substrate. In this case the bottom row of nails transmits the vertical forces in the sheathing to the bottom rail (instead of the stud) where the anchor bolts will further transmit the forces into the foundation. In this report hold downs have been experimentally studied with respect to the strength and stiffness of the connection. Four different types of hold downs have been tested. The specimen was subjected to tension load applied to the stud. Four tests series are presented. Each series was divided into different sets according to the type of fastener used with the hold down device. The results show that the failure load is higher when hold downs with anchor bolts are used, up to ten times higher than the anchorage that uses only screws or nails. The failure mode vary with the type of hold down and the type of fasteners used. The tests showed three primary failure modes: failure of the stud when a bolt is used as the fastener between hold down device and stud, failure due to pull-out of the screws or nails from the rail and failure due to failure or pull-out of screws or nails from stud. Also, failure of the stud itself occurred in some tests caused by some defect of the timber.
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Comparison of Bending Stiffness of Cross-Laminated Solid Timber Derived by Modal Analysis of Full Panels and by Bending Tests of Strip-Shaped Specimens

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue445
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Steiger, René
Gülzow, Arne
Czaderski, Christoph
Howald, Martin
Niemz, Peter
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Year of Publication
2012
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Elastic Properties
Stiffness Properties
Bending Test
Bending Stiffness
Panels
Research Status
Complete
Series
European Journal of Wood and Wood Products
Summary
The design of cross-laminated solid timber (CLT) as load-bearing plates is mainly governed by serviceability criterions like maximal deflection and susceptibility to vibration. Hence, predicting the respective behavior of such plates requires accurate information about their elastic properties. According to product standards, the bending stiffness of CLT has to be assessed from 4-point bending tests of strip-shaped specimens, cut from the CLT panels. By comparing elastic properties of CLT derived by means of modal analysis of full panels with the results of bending tests on 100 mm and 300 mm wide strip-shaped specimens it is shown, that by testing single 100 mm wide strip-shaped specimens bending stiffness of full panels cannot be assessed correctly, whereas single 300 mm wide strips or averages of 5 to 6 100 mm wide strip-shaped specimens lead to acceptable results. Hence, strip-shaped specimens should only be used in the course of factory quality control or when assessing the bending stiffness of parts of CLT panels used as beam-like load-bearing elements but not to derive bending stiffness of gross CLT panels. Verification by carrying out static bending tests of gross CLT panels under different loading situations showed that alternatively to tests on strip-shaped specimens or estimations with the compound theory, the overall stiffness properties of CLT can be derived directly by a modal analysis of full-size panels.
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Truss Plates for Use as Wood-Concrete Composite Shear Connectors

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue732
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Beams
Author
Clouston, Peggi
Schreyer, Alexander
Organization
Structures Congress
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2012
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Beams
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
shear connectors
Truss Plates
Slip-modulus
Ultimate Shear Capacity
Push-Out
Bending Stiffness
Strength
Four Point Bending Test
Conference
Structures Congress 2011
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 14-16, 2011, Las Vegas, Nevada, United States
Summary
Wood-concrete composite systems are well established, structurally efficient building systems for both new construction and rehabilitation of old timber structures. Composite action is achieved through a mechanical device to integrally connect in shear the two material components, wood and concrete. Depending on the device, different levels of composite action and thus efficiency are achieved. The purpose of this study was to investigate the structural feasibility and effectiveness of using truss plates, typically used in the making of metal-plate-connected wood trusses, as shear connectors for laminated veneer lumber (LVL)-concrete composite systems. The experimental program consisted of two studies. The first study established slip-modulus and ultimate shear capacity of the truss plates when used in an LVL-concrete push out assembly. The second study evaluated overall composite bending stiffness and strength in two full size T-beams when subjected to four-point bending. One beam employed two continuous rows of truss plates and the other employed one row. It was found that the initial stiffness of both T-beams was similar for one and two rows of truss plates but that the ultimate capacity was approximately 20% less with the use of only one row.
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Investigations on the Serviceability Limit State of Dowel-Type Timber Connections

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue911
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Serviceability
Connections
Author
Dorn, Micheal
Organization
Vienna University of Technology
Year of Publication
2012
Format
Thesis
Topic
Serviceability
Connections
Keywords
dowel-type connection
Steel-to-Timber
Failure Modes
Ductility
Eurocode 5
Strength
Stiffness
contact behavior
finite element method
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The aim of this thesis is to study the load-carrying behaviour of dowel-type steel-to-timber connections in detail. This is achieved by performing experimental tests on single-dowel connections. A large variety of influencing parameters is assessed, which include wood density, connection width, the dowel roughness, and the application of reinforcements in order to prevent brittle behaviour. Separate stages in the loading history are identified, starting from an initial consolidation phase, the region of maximum stiffness during load increase, and the point of maximum connection strength. The results of the experiments are compared to the design practice in Eurocode 5 for strength and stiffness estimation. Strength prediction is conservative except for slender connections, while stiffness prediction complied with experimental results only for connections of intermediate width.
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216 records – page 1 of 22.