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25 records – page 1 of 3.

Impact Sound Insulation in Wood Multi-Family Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2623
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Design and Systems
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Hu, Lin
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2012
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Design and Systems
Keywords
Mid-Rise
High-Rise
Sound Transmission
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The number of occupant complaints received about annoying low-frequency footstep impact sound transmission through wood floor-ceiling assemblies has been increasing in proportion with the increase in the number of multi-family wood buildings built. Little work has been conducted to develop solutions to control the low-frequency footstep impact sound transmission. There are no code provisions or sound solutions in the codes. Current construction practices are based on a trial and error approach. This two-years project was conducted to remove this barrier and to successfully expand the use of wood in the multi-family and mid- to high-rise building markets. The key objective was to build a framework for the development of thorough solutions to control low-frequency footstep sound transmission through wood floor-ceiling assemblies. Field acoustic tests and case studies were conducted in collaboration with acoustics researchers, builders, developers, architects, design engineers and producers of wood building components. The field study found that: 1. With proper design of the base wood-joisted floors and sound details of the ceiling: With no topping on the floor, the floor-ceiling assembly did not provide sufficient impact sound insulation for low- to high-frequency sound components ; Use of a 13-mm thick wood composite topping along with the ceiling did not ensure satisfactory impact sound insulation; Even if there was the ceiling, use of a 38-mm thick concrete topping without a proper insulation layer to float the topping did not ensure satisfactory impact sound insulation ; A topping system having a mass over 20 kg/m2 and composed of composite panels and an insulation layer with proper thickness achieved satisfactory impact sound insulation. 2. The proper design of the base wood-joisted floors was achieved by the correct combination of floor mass and stiffness. The heaviest wood-joisted floors did not necessarily ensure satisfactory impact insulation. 3. Proper sound ceiling details were found to be achieved through: Use of two layers of gypsum board; Use of sound absorption materials filling at least 50% of the cavity ; Installation of resilient channels to the bottom of the joists through anchoring acoustic system resulted in improved impact sound insulation than directly attaching the resilient channels to the bottom of the joists. A four-task research plan was developed to thoroughly address the issue of poor low-frequency footstep impact insulation of current lightweight wood floor-ceiling assemblies and to correct prejudice against wood. The tasks include: 1) fundamental work to develop code provisions; 2) expansion of FPInnovations’ material testing laboratory to include tests to characterize the acoustic properties of materials; 3) development of control strategies; and 4) implementation. The laboratory acoustic research facility built includes a mock-up field floor-ceiling assembly with adjustable span and room height, a testing system and a building acoustic simulation software. The preliminary study on the effects of flooring, topping and underlayment on FIIC of the mock-up of the filed floor-ceiling assembly in FPInnovations’ acoustic chamber confirmed some findings from the field study. The laboratory study found that: A topping was necessary to ensure the satisfactory impact sound insulation; The topping should be floated on proper underlayment; Topping mass affects impact sound insulation of wood framed floors; A floating flooring enhanced the impact sound insulation of wood framed floors along with the floating topping. It is concluded that: 1. even if the studies only touched the tip of the iceberg of the footstep impact sound insulation of lightweight wood-joisted floor systems, the proposed solutions are promising but still need verification ; 2. with proper design of the base wood floor structure, the proper combination of flooring, and sound ceiling details along with proper installation, the lightweight wood floor-ceiling assembly can achieve satisfactory impact sound insulation ; 3. this study establishes a framework for thoroughly solving low-frequency footstep impact sound insulation problem in lightweight wood-joisted floor systems. Solutions will be developed in the next phase of this study as planned and the study will be conducted under NRCan Transformative Technology program with a project dedicated to “Serviceability of next generation wood building systems”.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Analysis on Structureborne Sound Transmission at Junctions of Solid Wood Double Walls with Continuous Floors

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1869
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Author
Schoenwald, Stefan
Zeitler, Berndt
Sabourin, Ivan
Organization
European Acoustics Association
Year of Publication
2014
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Sound Transmission
Sound Insulation
Radiation Efficiencies
Conference
Forum Acusticum 2014
Research Status
Complete
Notes
September 7-12, 2014, Krakow, Poland
Summary
Structure-borne sound transmission across a cross-junction of double solid timber walls with a solid timber floor was analyzed in a recent research project. Both, the double walls as well as floor slab, were of so-called Cross Laminated Timber (CLT). The floor slab was continuous across the junction for structural reasons and thus, formed a sound bridge between the elements of the double wall. To gain a better understanding of the contributions of sound transmission between the wall and floor elements from the different possible paths, a thorough analysis was conducted. Hereby, direct sound transmission through, and radiation efficiencies of, the CLT elements were measured in a direct sound transmission facility; as well as, structure-borne sound transmission between CLT elements was measured on a junction mock-up. The experimental data was used as in-put data and for validation of the engineering model of EN 12354/ISO 15712 for the prediction of flanking sound insulation in buildings. The test procedures, analysis and results of this research project are presented here.
Online Access
Free
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Serviceability of Next-Generation Wood Buildings: Sound Insulation Performance of Wood Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue402
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Serviceability
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Floors
Walls
Author
Hu, Lin
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2014
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Floors
Walls
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Serviceability
Keywords
Apparent Sound Insulation Class
Field Sound Insulation Class
Apparently Sound Transmission Class
Field Sound Transmission Class
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This report documents apparent/field impact insulation class (AIIC/FIIC) ratings and apparent/field sound transmission class (ASTC/FSTC) ratings for a large number of light-frame wood-joisted floors, cross-laminated timber floors (CLT), massive glulam floors, and a wood-concrete composite floor. The report includes various construction details involving finishings, membranes under finishings, toppings, underlayment materials for toppings, and drywall ceilings. This report also documents ASTC/FSTC ratings for some light-frame wood stud walls and CLT walls. The informal subjective evaluation of field floors and walls by FPInnovations staff, and by occupants, revealed that, if a FSTC or FIIC rating is below 45, occupants could clearly hear sound generated by their neighbor’s normal activities. If a FSTC or FIIC rating is above 50, occupants could still hear "muffled" sound generated by their neighbor’s normal activities, but do not hear it as clearly. If a FSTC or FIIC rating is above 60, occupants could not hear any sound generated by their neighbor’s activities, except when there is a lightweight floor with a carpet. In that case, low frequency footsteps could be heard even if the FIIC was above 60.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Model Calibration of Wooden Structure Assemblies - Using EMA and FEA

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue638
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Bolmsvik, Åsa
Linderholt, Andreas
Olsson, Jörgen
Year of Publication
2014
Format
Conference Paper
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Experimental Modal Analysis
Finite Element Model
Sound Transmission
Vibrational Tests
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
To predict and, when needed to fulfil regularizations or other requirements, lower the impact sound transmission in light weight buildings prior to building, dynamically representative calculation models are needed. The material properties of commonly used building components have a documented spread in literature. Therefore, to validate the junction models, the dynamics of the actual assembly components have to be known. Here, the dynamic properties of a number of component candidates are measured using hammer excited vibrational tests. The spread of the properties of the components are hereby gained. Some of the components are selected to build up wooden assemblies which are evaluated first when they are screwed together and later when they are screwed and glued together. The focus is here on achieving representative finite element models of the junctions between the building parts composing the assemblies.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Acoustics Summary: Sound Insulation in Mid-Rise Wood Building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue750
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Schoenwald, Stefan
Zeitler, Berndt
King, Frances
Sabourin, Ivan
Organization
National Research Council of Canada
Year of Publication
2014
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Design and Systems
Keywords
Mid-Rise
Sound Insulation
Impact Sound Transmission
Airborne Sound Transmission
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This report summarizes the acoustics research component regarding sound insulation of elements and systems for the research project on mid-rise and larger wood buildings. The summary outlines the background, main research considerations, research conducted and major outcomes. Further details of the design and the results can found in the appendix of Client Report A1-100035-02.1. The goal of the acoustics research components was to develop design solutions for mid-rise wood and wood-hybrid buildings that comply both with the current National Building Code of Canada (NBCC) 2010 [2] requirements for direct sound insulation and with the anticipated requirements for flanking sound transmission in the proposed, 2015 version of the NBCC. In addition, the design solutions were to provide better impact sound insulation while still achieving code compliance for all other disciplines (interdependencies) as identified in the final report of the scoping study conducted in FY 2010/2011.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Model Calibration of Wooden Strucuture Assemblies - Using EMA and FEA

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1001
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Bolmsvik, Åsa
Linderholt, Andreas
Olsson, Jörgen
Year of Publication
2014
Format
Conference Paper
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Finite Element Model
Experimental Modal Analysis
Impact Sound Transmission
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
To predict and, when needed to fulfil regularizations or other requirements, lower the impact sound transmission in light weight buildings prior to building, dynamically representative calculation models are needed. The material properties of commonly used building components have a documented spread in literature. Therefore, to validate the junction models, the dynamics of the actual assembly components have to be known. Here, the dynamic properties of a number of component candidates are measured using hammer excited vibrational tests. The spread of the properties of the components are hereby gained. Some of the components are selected to build up wooden assemblies which are evaluated first when they are screwed together and later when they are screwed and glued together. The focus is here on achieving representative finite element models of the junctions between the building parts composing the assemblies.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Air-Borne Sound Transmission through Triple-Leaf Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2235
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Author
Eslami, Armin
Organization
Carleton University
Year of Publication
2015
Format
Thesis
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Mid-Rise
Airborne Sound
Model
Sound Transmission
Sound Insulation
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The Midply™ triple-leaf shear resistive wall is designed by FPInnovations and UBC to be employed in mid-rise wood building. Compared to double-leaf structures, this wall has a weaker low-frequency sound insulation due to the additional resonance created by the middle-leaf. The original contribution of this thesis is developing a method to predict the air-borne sound transmission through triple-leaf walls, which can incorporate perforated plates. The model is based on a modified Transfer Matrix Method (TMM) that accounts for the losses at the perimeter of the finite cavity. The air-borne sound transmission tests performed on simplified small-scale structures showed that the modified TMM model has acceptable predictions in most frequencies, although Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) was superior for high-frequency predictions. The research suggests that the sound insulation in triple-leaf structures could be improved through careful perforation of the middle-leaf, which is suggested for future work.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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In-Situ Testing at Wood Innovation and Design Centre: Floor Vibration, Building Vibration, and Sound Insulation Performance

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue284
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Author
Hu, Lin
Pirvu, Ciprian
Ramzi, Redouane
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2015
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Natural Frequency
Damping Ratio
Static Deflection Testing
Vibration Performance
Sound Transmission
Research Status
Complete
Summary
In order to address the lack of measured natural frequencies and damping ratios for wood and hybrid wood buildings, and lack of knowledge of vibration performance of innovative CLT floors and sound insulation performance of CLT walls and floors, FPInnovations conducted a series of performance testing at the Wood Innovation Design Centre (WIDC) in Prince George, BC in April 2014, during construction, and in May 2015, after building completion and during its occupation. This report describes the building, tested floor and wall assemblies, test methods, and summarizes the test results. The preliminary performance data provides critical feedback on the design of the building for resisting wind-induced vibration and on the floor vibration controlled design. The data can be further used to validate the calculation methods and tools/models of dynamic analysis.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Acoustic Testing of CLT and Glulam Floor Assemblies

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1863
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Sabourin, Ivan
Organization
National Research Council of Canada
Publisher
Regupol America
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Transmission Loss
Impact Sound Transmission
Impact Sound Pressure Level
Research Status
Complete
Series
Nordic Engineered Wood Report
Summary
This report contains the transmission loss (TL) results measured in accordance with ASTM E90-09 and the normalized impact sound pressure level (NISPL) results measured in accordance with ASTM E492-09 of 13 cross-laminated timber (CLT) floor assemblies and 5 glulam floor assemblies. The report also contains the nonstandard impact sound pressure level results measured on 6 different small patch specimens. Summary tables containing the specimen number, sketch, short description, the sound transmission class (STC) and impact isolation class (IIC) ratings, as well as, the page number of the detailed test reports are provided starting on page 5. A brief analysis of the floors tested as part of this test series is provided after the summary tables on page 9. The standard test reports of the tested floor assemblies begin on page 16. The floor assemblies were built and tested between January and April 2016.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Experimental Study on Air Tone Interruption Performance of CLT Panel Wall

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1802
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Tanaka, Manabu
Kasai, Yusuke
Murakami, Tsuyoshi
Kawaya, Shoji
Publisher
J-STAGE
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Sound Transmission
Panels
Experimental Tests
Sound Insulation
Research Status
Complete
Series
Japanese Architectural Institute Environmental Papers
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

25 records – page 1 of 3.