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9 records – page 1 of 1.

An Innovative Hybrid Timber Structure in Japan: Beam-to-Beam Moment Resisting Connection

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1581
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Author
Kusumoto, Shigeharu
Shioya, Shinichi
Kawabe, Ryosuke
Inomoto, Kotaro
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Steel Bars
Epoxy
Beam-to-Beam
Four Point Bending Test
Short-term
Long-term
Ductility
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 1791-1798
Summary
Hybrid composite glulam timber reinforced using deformed steel bars and epoxy resin adhesive (RGTSB), was significantly developed in Kagoshima University. In this paper, a beam-to-beam connection for RGTSB and experimental data on the connection are presented. Two 2:3-scaled simply-supported beams under four-point flexural bending in short-term loading, connection elements under short and long-term tension loading were tested. The connection for RGTSB beam performed on bending behaviour such as non-connection RGTSB beam, especially better on ductility.
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Development of Steel-Timber Composite System for Large Scale Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1696
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Beams
Author
Hassanieh, Amirhossein
Valipour, Hamid
Bradford, Mark
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Beams
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Keywords
Short-term
Ultimate Limit States
Push-Out Tests
Failure Modes
Four Point Bending Test
Strength
Stiffness
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 4322-4331
Summary
In this paper a novel and efficient structural system, that comprises steel beams and prefabricated timber slabs is developed and tested under short-term service and ultimate limit state loading conditions. In the proposed steeltimber composite (STC) system, bolt and coach screws are employed to transfer shear between steel beam and prefabricated timber slab and provide a composite connection. A series of experimental push-out tests were carried out on cross-banded LVL-Steel and CLT-Steel hybrid specimens to investigate the behaviour of different connection types. Furthermore, the load-deflection response of full-scale STC beams was captured by conducting 4-point bending tests on STC beams. The failure modes of connections and composite beams have been monitored and reported. The results illustrate advantages of using timber panels in conjunction with steel girders in terms of increasing strength and stiffness of composite beams
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Duration-Of-Load and Size Effects on the Rolling Shear Strength of Cross Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue191
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Li, Yuan
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Long-term
Mountain Pine Beetle
Short-term
Duration of Load
Rolling Shear Strength
Torque Loading Tests
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
In this study, the duration-of-load and size effects on the rolling shear strength of CLT manufactured from MPB-afflicted lumber were evaluated. The study of the duration-of-load effect on the strength properties of wood products is typically challenging; and, additional complexity exists with the duration-of-load effect on the rolling shear strength of CLT, given the necessary consideration of crosswise layups of wood boards, existing gaps and glue bonding between layers. In this research, short-term ramp loading tests and long-term trapezoidal fatigue loading tests (damage accumulation tests) were used to study the duration-of-load behaviour of the rolling shear strength of CLT. In the ramp loading test, three-layer CLT products showed a relatively lower rolling shear load-carrying capacity. Torque loading tests on CLT tubes were also performed. The finite element method was adopted to simulate the structural behaviour of CLT specimens. Evaluation of the rolling shear strength based on test data was discussed. The size effect on the rolling shear strength was investigated. The results suggest that the rolling shear duration-of-load strength adjustment factor for CLT is more severe than the general duration-ofload adjustment factor for lumber, and this difference should be considered in the introduction of CLT into the building codes for engineered wood design.
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Glued Timber-Concrete Beams – Analytical and Numerical Models for Assessment of Composite Action

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue154
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Design and Systems
Serviceability
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Beams
Author
Skec, Leo
Bjelanovic, Adriana
Jelenic, Gordan
Publisher
HRCAK
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
Croatia
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Beams
Topic
Design and Systems
Serviceability
Keywords
Finite Element Model
Load Carrying Capacity
Loading
Numerical models
Short-term
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Engineering Review
Summary
An analysis of glued composite timber-concrete systems is presented. Experimental data obtained from laboratory tests under short-term loading are compared with the analytical calculation and the design procedure for fully composite beams given in the EN 1995-1-1 standard. Numerical linear 2D finite element modelling and an analytical solution assuming linear elastic behaviour of glue and the interlayer slip are also conducted and validated. The effect of composite action in the three mentioned approaches is assessed by comparison of midspan deflections. In this way, a parametric study of the glue-line properties and the interlayer slip stiffness on load-carrying capacity and serviceability of glued composite beams exposed to short-time loading is easily performed.
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High Performance CFRP-Timber-Concrete Laminated Composite Members

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1698
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Beams
Author
Balogh, Jeno
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Beams
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Strength
Stiffness
Loading
Short-term
Laboratory Tests
Finite Element Model
Tension
CFRP
Failure Mode
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 4352-4359
Summary
This paper deals with laminated timber-concrete (LTC) composite beam members, for applications in sustainable building structures, in which the interlayer connection is achieved with adhesives, similarly to the glued laminated timber beams, instead of the classically used shear connectors (e.g. mechanical connectors or notches). Only a small number of studies of this type of high-performance members are available. The strength and stiffness of the LTC under short-term static ramp-loading were studied on new and retrofit (joist-type) floor members, through laboratory tests and non-linear finite element modelling. In the initial tests the typical failure mode observed was the failure of the wood in tension. Consequently, a carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) layer was added to the tension side of the timber layer, forming a multi-composite member. The research results indicate that the structural performance in terms of efficiencies and strength for the LTC beams exceeds the corresponding performance of similar classical timber-concrete beams with shear connectors due to the different shear transfer and failure modes. By adding the CFRP reinforcement to the tension fibres of the timber layer, the failure mode changed again, allowing for further increase in strength and stiffness.
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Investigation of a Proposed Long Span Timber Floor for Non-Residential Applications

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue197
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Floors
Author
Zabihi, Zhinus
Organization
University of Technology Sydney
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Australia
Format
Thesis
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Commercial
Failure
Long Span
Large Span
Industrial
Short-term
Static Behaviour
Finite element (FE) model
Stress-Strain
Full Scale
Composites
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This PhD research provides a detailed procedure for designing and investigating the short term static behaviour of a proposed long span timber floor system for non-residential applications that meets serviceability and ultimate limit design criteria, with the use of timber as the only structural load bearing part of the system. In this study the behaviour of two types of LVL are investigated through a number of experimental and analytical tests. As a result of the tension and compression tests, a suitable constitutive law is developed which can accurately capture the stress-strain relationship and the failure behaviour of LVL, and it can also be incorporated into FE analysis of any LVL beam with similar structural features to the tested specimens. Further, the results of the full scale four point bending tests on LVL sections are used to identify the behaviour of LVL up to the failure point and to develop a finite element model to capture the behaviour and failure of LVL. Moreover, after investigating the long span timber floors, one system is proposed to be fabricated for the extensive experimental and numerical investigation. The results of the full scale experimental tests together with the numerical investigation provide a robust model for predicting the performance of any timber beams with similar structural features to the proposed system while the dimensions and spans can be varied according to special requirements such as dynamic performance or fire resistance requirements.
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Performance Based Tests on Cross Laminated Timber - Concrete Composite Floor Panels

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1423
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors

Thin Topping Timber-Concrete Composite Floors

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue902
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Skinner, Jonathan
Organization
University of Bath
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
United Kingdom
Format
Thesis
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Stiffness
Vibration Response
Topping Thickness
Screws
shear connectors
Static Loads
Cyclic Loads
Short-term
Bending Tests
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
A timber-concrete composite (TCC) combines timber and concrete, utilising the complementary properties of each material. The composite is designed in such a way that the timber resists combined tension and bending, whilst the concrete resists combined compression and bending. This construction technique can be used either in new build construction, or in refurbishment, for upgrading existing timber structures. Its use is most prolific in continental Europe, Australasia, and the United States of America but has yet to be widely used in the United Kingdom. To date, the topping upgrades used have been 40mm thick or greater. Depending on the choice of shear connection, this can lead to a four-fold increase in strength and stiffness of the floor. However, in many practical refurbishment situations, such a large increase in stiffness is not required, therefore a thinner topping can suffice. The overarching aim of this study has been to develop a thin (20mm) topping timber-concrete composite upgrade with a view to improving the serviceability performance of existing timber floors. Particular emphasis was given to developing an understanding of how the upgrade changes the stiffness and transient vibration response of a timber floor. Initially, an analytical study was carried out to define an appropriate topping thickness. An experimental testing programme was then completed to: characterise suitable shear connectors under static and cyclic loads, assess the benefit of the upgrade to the short-term bending performance of panels and floors, and evaluate the influence of the upgrade on the transient vibration response of a floor. For refurbishing timber floors, a 20mm thick topping sufficiently increased the bending stiffness and improved the transient vibration response. The stiffness of the screw connectors was influenced by the thickness of the topping and the inclination of the screws. During the short-term bending tests, the gamma method provided a non-conservative prediction of composite bending stiffness. In the majority of cases the modal frequencies of the floors tested increased after upgrade, whilst the damping ratios decreased. The upgrade system was shown to be robust as cracking of the topping did not influence the short-term bending performance of panels. Thin topping TCC upgrades offer a practical and effective solution to building practitioners, for improving the serviceability performance of existing timber floors.
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Timber-Steel Hybrid Beams for Multi-Storey Buildings: Final Report

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1687
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Steel-Timber Composite
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Beams
Author
Winter, Wolfgang
Tavoussi, Kamyar
Riola Parada, Felipe
Bradley, Andrew
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Steel-Timber Composite
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Beams
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Multi-Storey
Short-term
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 4210-4219
Summary
Timber-steel hybrid beams have been proposed, tested and analyzed for their use in multi-storey buildings. After the first concepts and tests were presented in the WCTE 2014, two whole testing series are finished and their results globally presented and analyzed. The beams fulfilled all the expectations and therefore can be presented as a reliable possibility for future proposals of timber-based frame multi-storey buildings. The present paper presents a summary of the part regarding hybrid beams inside the research project “Timber based mixed systems for dense construction in urban areas” carried out by the Institute of Structural Design and Timber Engineering of the Vienna University of Technology.
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9 records – page 1 of 1.