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23 records – page 1 of 3.

Advancing Knowledge of Mid-ply Shear Walls: Mid-Ply Shear Wall Fire Resistance Testing

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2808
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Fire
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Ranger, Lindsay
Dagenais, Christian
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Shear Walls
Fire Resistance Rating
Mid-Rise
Midply Wall
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The objective of this research is to address a knowledge gap related to fire performance of midply shear walls. Testing has already been done to establish the structural performance of these assemblies. To ensure their safe implementation and their broad acceptance, this project will establish fire resistance ratings for midply shear walls. Fire tests will provide information for the development of design considerations for midply shear walls and confirm that they can achieve at least 1-hour fire-resistance ratings that are required for use in mid-rise buildings. This research will support greater adoption of mid-rise residential and non-residential wood-frame construction and improve competition with similar buildings of noncombustible construction. This work will also support the development of the APA system report for midply walls, which will be a design guideline for using midply walls in North America.
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Free
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Combination of Steel Plate Shear Walls and Timber Moment Frames for Improved Seismic Performance

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2735
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Frames
Author
Iqbal, Asif
Todorov, Borislav
Billah, Muntasir
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Frames
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Timber Moment Frames
Steel Plate Shear Walls
Hybrid
Seismic Performance
Interstory Drifts
Conference
World Conference on Earthquake Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Recent interests in adopting sustainable materials and developments in construction technology have created a trend of aiming for greater heights with timber buildings. With the increased height these buildings are subjected to higher level of lateral load demand. A common and efficient way to increase capacity is to use shearwalls, which can resist significant part of the load on the structures. Prefabricated mass timber panels such as those made of Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) can be used to form the shearwalls. But due to relatively low stiffness value of timber it is often difficult to keep the maximum drifts within acceptable limit prescribed by building codes. It becomes necessary to either increase wall sizes to beyond available panel dimensions or use multiple or groups of walls spread over different locations over the floor plan. Both of the options are problematic from the economic and functional point of view. One possible alternative is to adopt a Hybrid system, using Steel Plate Shear Walls (SPSW) with timber moment frames. The SPSW has much higher stiffness and combined with timber frames it can reduce overall building drifts significantly. Frames with prefabricated timber members have considerable lateral load capacity. For structures located in seismic regions the system possesses excellent energy dissipation ability with combination of ductile SPSW and yielding elements within the frames. This paper investigates combination of SPSW with timber frames for seismic applications. Numerical model of the system has been developed to examine the interaction between the frames and shear walls under extreme lateral load conditions. Arrangements of different geometries of frames and shear walls are evaluated to determine their compatibility and efficiency in sharing lateral loads. Recommendations are presented for optimum solutions as well as practical limits of applications.
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Cross Laminated Timber Shear Wall Connections for Seismic Applications

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2405
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls

Cross Laminated Timber Shear Wall Connections for Seismic Applications

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2406
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls

Cross-Laminated Timber Shear Walls in Balloon Construction: Seismic Performance of Steel Connections

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2413
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls

Development of Modular System in Midrise to Tall Wood Buildings Phase II

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2530
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Zhang, Chao
Organization
Timber Engineering and Applied Mechanics (TEAM) Laboratory
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Openings
Lateral Performance
Shear Walls
SPF
Spruce-Pine-Fir
Loading Tests
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This project studied the effect of openings on the lateral performance of CLT shear walls and the system behavior of the walls in a module. Three-layer Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) was used for manufacturing the wall and module specimens. The laminar was Spruce-Pine-Fir (SPF) #2&Better for both the major and minor layers. Each layer was 35 mm thick. The panel size was 2.44 m × 2.44 m. Four configurations of walls were investigated: no opening, 25% opening, 37.5% opening, and 50% opening. The opening was at the center of the wall and in the shape of a square. A CLT module was made from two walls with 50% openings, with an overall thickness of 660 mm. The specimens were tested under monotonic loading and reverse-cyclic loading, in accordance with ASTM E564-06 (2018) and ASTM E2126-19. The wall without opening had an average peak load of 111.8 kN. It had little internal deformation and the failure occurred at the connections. With a 25% opening, deformation within the wall was observed but the failure remained at the connections. It had the same peak load as the full wall. When the opening was increased to 37.5%, the peak load decreased by 6% to 104.9 kN and the specimens failed in wood at the corners of the opening. Further increasing the opening to 50%, the peak load dropped drastically to 63.4 kN, only 57% of the full wall. The load-displacement relationship was approximately linear until the load reached 60% of the peak or more. Compared to the full wall, the wall with 25% opening had 65% of the stiffness. When the opening increased to 37.5% and 50%, the stiffness reduced to 50% and 24% of the full wall, respectively. The relationship between stiffness and opening ratio was approximately linear. The loading protocol had effect on the peak load but not on the stiffness. There was more degradation for larger openings under reverse-cyclic loading. The performance of the module indicated the presence of system effect that improves the ductility of the wall, which is important for the seismic performance of the proposed midrise to tall wood buildings. The test data was compared to previous models found in literature. Simplified analytical models were also developed to estimate the lateral stiffness and strength of CLT wall with openings.
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Effects of Moisture Intrusion on the Performance of a Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) Angle Bracket Connection

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2703
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Connections
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Bora, Shrenik
Publisher
Oregon State University
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Connections
Moisture
Keywords
Shear Walls
Wall-to-Diaphragm L-Bracket Connection
High Moisture Exposure Conditions
Moisture Cycling
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is revolutionizing the use of wood in the construction sector of North America as a solution for walls and diaphragms in mid-rise or even high-rise timber structures on account of its environmental advantages, high strength-to- weight ratio, fire-safety performance, and propensity for prefabrication. However, considering the hygroscopic nature of wood, moisture intrusion can affect material properties and, moreover, moisture increases the possibility of biological degradation, which can directly affect the durability of CLT structural members and their connections. The favorable seismic performance of connections in the CLT structural systems has been well researched in numerous studies. In addition, even though several research efforts have been conducted to understand the hygrothermal performance of CLT panels, knowledge of the CLT connections when subjected to moisture cycling is minimal. In this study, a CLT shear wall-to-diaphragm L-bracket connection is exposed to two high moisture exposure conditions - flood and simulated rain with increased humidity as well as different exposure durations to investigate the connection performance under the effects of moisture intrusion. Currently, there are four major species that are used for CLT, namely, Douglas-fir, Southern yellow pine, Norway spruce, and Spruce Pine Fir. All four species were incorporated into the study. A total of 264 cyclic tests were performed on wall-to-diaphragm L-bracket connection specimens to evaluate the connection performance in terms of strength, stiffness, and energy dissipation along with the development of two force-displacement engineering models. Results from both exposure studies suggest no significant degradation in connection performance after a moisture cycle of wetting and drying apart from a significant decrease in energy dissipation in flood exposure. However, the effects of multiple moisture cycling merit further study.
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Evaluation of Horizontal Shear Performance of Larch CLT Walls According to the Edge Connection Shape

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2205
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls

Influence of Layer Arrangement on Bonding and Bending Performances of Cross-laminated Timber Using Two Different Species

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2591
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Author
Kim, Keon-Ho
Publisher
North Carolina State University
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Bonding Performance
Bending Performance
Shear Walls
Face Bonding Test
Three-Point Bending Test
Japanese Larch
Korean Red Pine
Research Status
Complete
Series
BioResources
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is a wood panel product that can be arranged in different ways. The advantage of utilizing CLT is the ability to use lamination even with low density materials or those that have defects, like knots. This study evaluated the bonding and bending performances of CLT utilizing domestic species in a shear wall or floor via a face bonding test of layers and a three-point bending test. The tests were carried out with three-layered CLT made up of Japanese larch and/or Korean red pine in various configurations. The layer arrangement for lamination was divided according to the species and grade of the wood. The out-of-plane and in-plane bending tests were conducted on the CLT according to the applicable direction in a wooden structure. The results of the bonding test showed that the block shear strength and delamination of all types of CLT met the BS EN 16351 (2015) standard requirements. The results of the bending test based on two wood species showed that the bending strength of the larch CLT was higher than that of the pine CLT in single species combinations. For mixed species combinations, the bending properties of CLT using larch as the major layer was higher than those using pine as the major layer. This demonstrated that the major layer had more influence on the bending properties of CLT and that Korean red pine was more suited for the minor layer of CLT.
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Free
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In-Plane Strength and Stiffness of Cross-Laminated Timber Shear Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2180
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls

23 records – page 1 of 3.