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62 records – page 2 of 7.

Duration-Of-Load and Size Effects on the Rolling Shear Strength of Cross Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue191
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Li, Yuan
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2015
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Long-term
Mountain Pine Beetle
Short-term
Duration of Load
Rolling Shear Strength
Torque Loading Tests
Research Status
Complete
Summary
In this study, the duration-of-load and size effects on the rolling shear strength of CLT manufactured from MPB-afflicted lumber were evaluated. The study of the duration-of-load effect on the strength properties of wood products is typically challenging; and, additional complexity exists with the duration-of-load effect on the rolling shear strength of CLT, given the necessary consideration of crosswise layups of wood boards, existing gaps and glue bonding between layers. In this research, short-term ramp loading tests and long-term trapezoidal fatigue loading tests (damage accumulation tests) were used to study the duration-of-load behaviour of the rolling shear strength of CLT. In the ramp loading test, three-layer CLT products showed a relatively lower rolling shear load-carrying capacity. Torque loading tests on CLT tubes were also performed. The finite element method was adopted to simulate the structural behaviour of CLT specimens. Evaluation of the rolling shear strength based on test data was discussed. The size effect on the rolling shear strength was investigated. The results suggest that the rolling shear duration-of-load strength adjustment factor for CLT is more severe than the general duration-ofload adjustment factor for lumber, and this difference should be considered in the introduction of CLT into the building codes for engineered wood design.
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Duration-Of-Load Effect on the Rolling Shear Strength of Cross Laminated Timber: Duration-Of-Load Tests and Damage Accumulation Model

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue228
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Li, Yuan
Lam, Frank
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2015
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Duration of Load
Long-term
Mountain Pine Beetle
Rolling Shear Strength
Stiffness
Strength
Stress Distribution
Research Status
Complete
Summary
In this study, the duration-of-load (DOL) effect on the rolling shear strength of cross laminated timber (CLT) was evaluated. A stress-based damage accumulation model is chosen to evaluate the DOL effect on the rolling shear strength of CLT. This model incorporates the established short-term rolling shear strength of material and predicts the time to failure under arbitrary loading history. The model was calibrated and verified based on the test data from low cycle trapezoidal fatigue tests (the damage accumulation tests). The long-term rolling shear behaviour of CLT can then be evaluated from this verified model. As the developed damage accumulation model is a probabilistic model, it can be incorporated into a time-reliability study. Therefore, a reliability assessment of the CLT products was performed considering short-term and snow loading cases. The reliability analysis results and factors reflecting the DOL effect on the rolling shear strength of CLT are compared and discussed. The results suggest that the DOL rolling shear strength adjustment factor for CLT is more severe than the general DOL adjustment factor for lumber; and, this difference should be considered in the introduction of CLT into the building codes for engineered wood design.
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Effect of Blue Stain on Bond Shear Resistance of Polyurethane Resins Used for Cross-Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2280
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Li, Xiaoping
Larkin, Blake
Muszynski, Lech
Morrell, Jeffrey
Publisher
Oregon State University
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Polyurethane
PUR Bonds
Lodgepole Pine
Shear Strength
Wood Failure
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The effect of blue stain on shear strength of cold-set polyurethane resin (PUR) bonds was investigated using lodgepole pine lumber with varying degrees of stain and two different wood grain orientations. While blue stain was associated with definite differences in wood permeability, it had no negative effect on shear strength or wood failure percent. The results indicate that blue stain will not adversely affect bond strength of PUR bonds.
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Effect of Growth Ring Orientation on the Rolling Shear Properties of Wooden Cross Layer Under Two-Plate Shear Test

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue635
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Zhou, Qinyi
Gong, Meng
Chui, Ying Hei
Mohammad, Mohammad
Year of Publication
2014
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Growth Ring Orientation
Rolling Shear Modulus
Rolling Shear Strength
Spruce
Two-plate shear test
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
The design and application of cross laminated timber (CLT) is s trongly influenced by rolling shear properties of cross layers. Hence, predicting the mechanical behaviour of CLT requires accurate information about its rolling shear properties. In this study, black spruce wood laminates with three different growth ring orientations (flat sawn, in-between, quarter sawn) were edge glued to produce wooden cross layer (WCL). Two-plate shear tests were carried out on WCL to investigate the influence of growth ring orientation on the rolling shear properties. The experimental results showed that the growth ring orientation had a significant effect on rolling shear modulus of WCL, however, almost no effect on the rolling shear strength. The WCL of in-between end grain had the maximum rolling shear modulus of 89MPa and rolling sh ear strength of 2.13 MPa.
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Effect of Laminated Structure Design on the Mechanical Properties of Bamboo-Wood Hybrid Laminated Veneer Lumber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1407
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Other Materials
Author
Chen, Fuming
Deng, Jianchao
Li, Xingjun
Wang, Ge
Smith, Lee
Shi, Sheldon
Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Year of Publication
2017
Format
Journal Article
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Other Materials
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Keywords
Bamboo
Poplar
Analytical Model
Density
MOE
MOR
Shear Strength
Glue Lines
Loading Tests
Research Status
Complete
Series
European Journal of Wood and Wood Products
Summary
The effects of veneer orientation and loading direction on the mechanical properties of bamboo-bundle/poplar veneer laminated veneer lumber (BWLVL) were investigated by a statistical analysis method. Eight types of laminated structure were designed for the BWLVL aiming to explore the feasibility of manufacturing high-performance bamboo-based composites. A specific type of bamboo species named Cizhu bamboo (Neosinocalamus affinis) with a thickness of 6 mm and diameter of 65 mm was used. The wood veneers were from fast-growing poplar tree (Populus ussuriensis Kom.) in China. The bamboo bundles were obtained by a mechanical process. They were then formed into uniform veneers using a onepiece veneer technology. Bamboo bundle and poplar veneer were immersed in water-soluble phenol formaldehyde (PF) resin with low molecular weight for 7 min and dried to MC of 8–12 % under the ambient environment. All specimens were prepared through hand lay-up using compressing molding method. The density and mechanical properties including modulus of elasticity (MOE), modulus of rupture (MOR), and shearing strength (SS) of samples were characterized under loading parallel and perpendicular to the glue line. The results indicated that as the contribution of bamboo bundle increased in laminated structure, especially laminated on the surface layers, the MOE, MOR and SS increased. A lay-up BBPBPBB (Bbamboo, P-poplar) had the highest properties due to the cooperation of bamboo bundle and poplar veneer. A higher value of MOE and MOR was found for the perpendicular loading test than that for the parallel test, while a slightly higher SS was observed parallel to the glue line compared with perpendicular loading. Any lay-up within the homogeneous group can be used to replace others for obtaining the same mechanical properties in applications. These findings suggested that the laminated structure with high stiffness laid-up on the surface layers could improve the performance of natural fiber reinforced composites.
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Effects of the presence or absence and the position of glued edge joints in the lamina on the shear strength of glued laminated timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3322
Year of Publication
2022
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Author
Ido, Hirofumi
Miyatake, Atsushi
Hiramatsu, Yasushi
Miyamoto, Kohta
Organization
Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute
Publisher
Springer
Year of Publication
2022
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Glued Edge Joint
Shear Strength
Japanese Cedar
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Wood Science
Summary
Four kinds of glued laminated timber were produced (i.e., one with a glued edge-joint and the other three with nonglued edge joints) in the lamina at different positions toward the depth direction. Shear tests using an asymmetric four-point bending method were then conducted for these glued laminated timber specimens. The results showed that although the glued edge-joint specimens had the highest shear strength in all groups, the shear strength decreased as the distance from the adjacent nonglued edge-joint plane decreased. Furthermore, the shear strength of all specimens exceeded the standard shear design strength value (2.1 N/mm2) set by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism, Japan. Next, the shear strength of the nonglued edge-joint specimens was estimated based on that of the glued edge-joint specimens. Although the mean-estimated shear strength was lower than the mean-measured shear strength, the possibility of the shear strength changing based on the position of the nonglued edge-joint plane specimens from that of the glued edge-joint specimens was still estimated.
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Effects of the Thickness of Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) Panels Made from Irish Sitka Spruce on Mechanical Performance in Bending and Shear

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue990
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Sikora, Karol
McPolin, Daniel
Harte, Annette
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Sitka Spruce
Thickness
Bending Stiffness
Rolling Shear Strength
Research Status
Complete
Series
Construction and Building Materials
Summary
An investigation was carried out on CLT panels made from Sitka spruce in order to establish the effect of the thickness of CLT panels on the bending stiffness and strength and the rolling shear. Bending and shear tests on 3-layer and 5-layer panels were performed with loading in the out-of-plane and in-plane directions. ‘Global’ stiffness measurements were found to correlate well with theoretical values. Based on the results, there was a general tendency that both the bending strength and rolling shear decreased with panel thickness. Mean values for rolling shear ranged from 1.0 N/mm2 to 2.0 N/mm2.
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Enhancing Thermal and Mechanical Performance of Engineered Wood Product Adhesives using Novel Fire Retardant Nanoclays

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2810
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Oguzlu-Baldelli, Hale
Yu, Jason
Lee, George
Lam, Frank
Jiang, Feng
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Fire
Keywords
Adhesive
PUR
Bond Strength
Halloysite
pMDI
Douglas-Fir
SPF
Bonding Shear Strength
Research Status
Complete
Summary
One component PUR adhesive is widely used in engineered wood products applications, such as cross-laminated timber (CLT). However, the dramatic deterioration of PUR adhesive bond strength at elevated temperature can out tremendously threat for tall wood building, especially under fire. In this project, we are aiming to improving the bond strength of the PUR adhesive at high temperature by incorporating chemically modified halloysite to improve the poor interface between inorganic fillers and the polymer matrices. To improve the interaction with PUR (Loctite UR20 by Henkel®), the halloysite was chemically grafted with polymeric diphenylmethane diisocyanate (pMDI) (pMDI-H). The effect of adding pMDI modified halloysite to the PUR adhesives was investigated in terms of nanofiller dispersibility, thermal and mechanical properties of the pMDI-halloysite-PUR composite film, and the bonding shear strength of the glued Douglas fir and Spruce-Pine-Fir (SPF) shear blocks under different temperature. Significant improvement of the bond shear strength can be observed with the addition of 5 and 10% of pMDI-modified PUR adhesive, and the key research findings are summarized as below, a. pMDI can be successfully grafted onto hydroxylated halloysites to improve its dispersibility in one-component PUR adhesive; b. Addition of pMDI-H into PUR adhesive can lead to improved glass transition temperature and storage modulus. In contrast, no significant enhancement was observed in h-H added PUR films due to the poor dispersibility; c. Addition of up to 10% h-H and pMDI-H did not show significant change of the shear strength at 20 °C for both Douglas Fir and SPF; d. Significant enhancement of shear strength at elevated temperature (60-100 °C) can be observed for 5% and 10% pMDI-H modified PUR adhesive, showing 17% improvement for Douglas Fir and 27-37% for SPF.
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Estimation of Bending Stiffness, Moment Carrying Capacity and Internal Shear Force of Sugi CLT Panel

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue622
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Okabe, Minoru
Yasumura, Motoi
Kobayashi, Kenji
Year of Publication
2014
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Internal Shear Strength
Bending Strength
Moment Carrying Capacity
Monte Carlo
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
CLT panels consist of several layers of lumber stacked crosswise and glued together on their faces. Prototype Sugi CLT floor panels were manufactured and bending and internal shear tests were carried out under the different parameters of lumber MOE, number of layers, thickness of lumber and thickness of CLT panels. On the basis of above tests, internal shear strength, bending stiffness and moment carrying capacity were estimated based on the lumber properties by Monte Carlo method. Bending stiffness EI of CLT panels could be estimated by adopting parallel layer theory and equivalent section area. Experimental moment carrying capacity showed 12% higher value than the calculated moment carrying capacity by average lumber failure method, and also showed 45% higher value than the calculated moment carrying capacity by minimum lumber failure method due to the reinforcement of the outer layer by the neighboring cross layer. Experimental internal shear force of CLT panel showed 30% higher value than the calculated one.
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Estimation of the Internal Shear Strength Distribution of the Element for Laminated Veneer Lumber by Nonlinear Least-Squares Method

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1461
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Author
Koseki, Makoto
Nakamura, Noboru
Naoi, Shinichiro
Publisher
Springer Japan
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Journal Article
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Nonlinear Least-Squares Method
Shear Strength
Modulus of Elasticity
Modulus of Rupture
Tensile Strength
Compression Strength
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Wood Science
Summary
Until now we developed an estimation method for strength distributions of laminated veneer lumber (LVL) element by nonlinear least-squares method (NLM). Estimated strengths by this method were modulus of elasticity (MOE) and modulus of rupture (MOR) in the horizontal use direction and the vertical use direction, tensile strength and compression strength. But to use LVL for structural members, shear strength was also needed. Therefore, we tried to estimate the shear strength distribution of LVL element by NLM same as MOE and MOR in the horizontal use direction and the vertical use direction, the tensile strength of LVL and the compression strength of LVL in the previous reports. We conducted shear strength test for LVL and estimated element shear strength distribution by LVL strength data in the horizontal and vertical use direction. Next, we simulated LVL shear strength distribution using element shear strength distribution and compared with experimental ones in each use direction. They were overlapped in both use direction. Therefore, we could validate NLM for estimating element shear strength distribution.
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62 records – page 2 of 7.