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Bamboo/Wood Composites and Structures Shear and Normal Strain Distributions in Multilayer Composite Laminated Panels under Out-of-Plane Bending

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2769
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Niederwestberg, Jan
Zhou, Jianhui
Chui, Ying Hei
Huang, Dongsheng
Publisher
Hindawi Publishing Corporation
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Three Point Bending Test
Shear Test
Digital Image Correlation
Strain
Shear Analogy
Finite Element Modelling
Stress
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Advances in Civil Engineering
Summary
Innovative mass timber panels, known as composite laminated panels (CLP), have been developed using lumber and laminated strand lumber (LSL) laminates. In this study, strain distributions of various 5-layer CLP and cross-laminated timber (CLT) were investigated by experimental and two modelling methods. Seven (7) different panel types were tested in third-point bending and short-span shear tests. During the tests, the digital imaging correlation (DIC) technique was used to measure the normal and shear strain in areas of interest. Evaluated component properties were used to determine strain distributions based on the shear analogy method and finite element (FE) modelling. The calculated theoretical strain distributions were compared with the DIC test results to evaluate the validity of strain distributions predicted by the analytical model (shear analogy) and numerical model (FE analysis). In addition, the influence of the test setup on the shear strain distribution was investigated. Results showed that the DIC strain distributions agreed well with the ones calculated by the shear analogy method and FE analysis. Both theoretical methods agree well with the test results in terms of strain distribution shape and magnitude. While the shear analogy method shows limitations when it comes to local strain close to the supports or gaps, the FE analysis reflects these strain shifts well. The findings support that the shear analogy is generally applicable for the stress and strain determination of CLP and CLT for structural design, while an FE analysis can be beneficial when it comes to the evaluation of localized stresses and strains. Due to the influence of compression at a support, the shear strain distribution near the support location is not symmetric. This is confirmed by the FE method.
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Evaluation of Mechanical Properties of Cross-Laminated Timber with Different Lay-ups Using Japanese Larch

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2516
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)

Multi-State Effort to Overcome Barriers to Low-value Hardwood Lumber for CLT Manufacture

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2633
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Organization
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Country of Publication
United States
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Shear Analogy
Yellow Poplar
Mechanical Tests
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Henry Quesada at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Summary
This project is a multistate industry-university collaboration between SmartLam, the Northeastern Lumber Manufacturers Association (NELMA), the American Plywood Association (APA), IKD Architectures, Virginia Tech, and Purdue University to advance the utilization of hardwood lumber for the fabrication of Cross- Laminated Timber (CLT). This new proposal builds upon a previous Wood Innovation project. The collaboration among the organizations proposes to: 1) apply the shear analogy method to hardwood species listed in the National Design Standards (NDS) supplement to assure these species are feasible for the construction of structural CLT panels, 2) create a custom grade CLT layup made of yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) lumber and get its approval by the Engineered Wood Association (APA), 3) train the hardwood industry in the Midwest and in the Southeast on the application of hardwood structural lumber grading rules, and 4) perform mechanical testing on the hardwood CLT panels used in the Conversation Plinth project by IKD Architectures in Columbus, IN. In 2012 Virginia Tech conducted the first experimental tests on hardwood CLT panels. Results indicated that bonding, strength, and stiffness of yellow poplar CLT panels matched or were superior to some of the softwood CLT layups in the APA standard. Similar results were also obtained by independent testing conducted by the American Hardwood Export Council (AHEC) in 2018. However, further investigation by Virginia Tech found that the main limitations for the use of yellow poplar and other low value hardwood species in CTL panels are 1) lack of experimental data on other hardwood species used in CLT panels, 2) lack of supply of structurally graded hardwood lumber, and 3) acceptance and validation of hardwood CLT panels by the APA standard. Overcoming these limitations is critical for the hardwood lumber industry in order to gain access to the CLT market. Currently, the annual production of CLT panels in the US is about 35,000 m3 but it is expected that in 10 years production will be close to 2 million m3 per year. The outcomes of this project are to increase the utilization of low-value hardwood species from national and private forests and to increase economic development in rural areas in the hardwood regions of the US.
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Refined Zigzag Theory: An Appropriate Tool for the Analysis of CLT-Plates and Other Shear-Elastic Timber Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2725
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Wimmer, Heinz
Hochhauser, Werner
Nachbagauer, Karin
Publisher
Springer
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Stress
Load
Refined Zigzag Theory
Bending
Gamma Method
Shear Analogy
First Order Shear Deformation Theory
Plates
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
European Journal of Wood and Wood Products
Summary
Cross laminated timber (CLT), as a structural plate-like timber product, has been established as a load bearing product for walls, floor and roof elements. In a bending situation due to the transverse shear flexibility of the crossing layers, the warping of the cross section follows a zigzag pattern which should be considered in the calculation model. The Refined Zigzag Theory (RZT) can fulfill this requirement in a very simple and efficient way. The RZT, founded in 2007 by A. Tessler (NASA Langley Research Center), M. Di Sciuva and M. Gherlone (Politecnico Torino) is a very robust and accurate analysis tool, which can handle the typical zigag warping of the cross section by introducing only one additional kinematic degree of freedom in case of plane beams and two more in case of biaxial bending of plates. Thus, the RZT-kinematics is able to reflect the specific and local stress behaviour near concentrated loads in combination with a warping constraint, while most other theories do not. A comparison is made with different methods of calculation, as the modified Gamma-method, the Shear Analogy method (SA) and the First Order Shear Deformation Theory (FSDT). For a test example of a two-span continuous beam, an error estimation concerning the maximum bending stress is presented depending on the slenderness L/h and the width of contact area at the intermediate support. A stability investigation shows that FSDT provides sufficiently accurate results if the ratio of bending and shear stiffness is in a range as stated in the test example. It is shown that by a simple modification in the determination of the zigzag function, the scope can be extended to beams with arbitrary non-rectangular cross section. This generalization step considerably improves the possibilities for the application of RZT. Furthermore, beam structures with interlayer slip can easily be treated. So the RZT is very well suited to analyze all kinds, of shear-elastic structural element like CLT-plate, timber-concrete composite structure or doweled beam in an accurate and unified way.
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The Rolling Shear Influence on the Out-of-Plane Behavior of CLT Panels: A Comparative Analysis

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2834
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Roofs
Floors
Author
Sandoli, Antonio
Calderoni, Bruno
Organization
University of Naples Federico II
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Italy
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Roofs
Floors
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Rolling Shear
Gamma Method
Shear Analogy
Out Of Plane
Flexural Behavior
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Buildings
Summary
This paper deals with the influence of the rolling shear deformation on the flexural behavior of CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber) panels. The morphological configuration of the panels, which consist of orthogonal overlapped layers of boards, led to a particular shear behavior when subjected to out-of-plane loadings: the low value of the shear modulus in orthogonal to grain direction (i.e., rolling shear modulus) gives rise to significant shear deformations in the transverse layers of boards, whose grains direction is perpendicular with respect to the tangential stresses direction. This produces increases of deflections and vibrations under service loads, creating discomfort for the users. Different analytical methods accounting for this phenomenon have been already developed and presented in literature. Comparative analyses among the results provided by some of these methods have been carried out in the present paper and the influence of the rolling shear deformations, with reference to different span-to-depth (L/H) ratios investigated. Moreover, the analytical results have also been compared with those obtained by more accurate 2D finite element models. The results show that, at the service limit states, the influence of the rolling shear can be significant when the aspect ratios became less than L/H = 30, and the phenomenon must be accurately considered in both deflection and stress analysis of CLT floors. Contrariwise, in the case of higher aspect ratios (slender panels), the deflections and stresses can be evaluated neglecting the rolling shear influence, assuming the layers of boards as fully-connected.
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Free
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