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16 records – page 1 of 2.

Advanced Quality and In-Service Condition Assessment Procedures for Mass Timber and Cross-Laminated Timber Products

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2558
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Organization
Forest Products Laboratory
Mississippi State University
Country of Publication
United States
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Non-Destructive Evaluation
Bond Performance
Monitoring Techniques
Serviceability
Quality Assurance
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contacts are Frederico França at Mississippi State University and Robert J. Ross at the Forest Products Laboratory
Summary
With the rapid development of CLT manufacturing capacity around the world and the increasing architectural acceptance and adoption, there is a current and pressing need regarding adhesive bond quality assurance in manufacturing. As with other engineered glued composites, adhesive bondline performance is critically important. Bondline assessment requires technology in the form of sensors, ultrasonics, load cells, or other means of reliable machine evaluation. The objectives of this cooperative study are to develop quality assurance procedures for monitoring the quality of mass timber and CLT during and after manufacturing and to develop assessment techniques for CLT panels in-service.
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Basis of Design - Performance-Based Design and Structural CD Drawings for Framework Office Building in Portland, OR

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1827
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Organization
KPFF Consulting Engineers
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Structural
Wind Load
Sustainability
Reliability
Seismic
Earthquake Resistance
Serviceability
Design
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Framework: An Urban + Rural Design
Notes
Document includes 100% CD construction drawings
Summary
This document outlines the basis of design for the performance-based design and nonlinear response history analysis of the Framework Project in Portland, OR. Performance-based design is pursued for this project because the proposed lateral force-resisting system, consisting of post-tensioned rocking cross-laminated timber (CLT) walls is not included in ASCE/SEI 7-10 Table 12.2-1.
Online Access
Free
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Connection Performance for LVL-Concrete Composite Floor System

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue292
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Fong Lee, Yen
Abd. Ghafar, Nor
Abd. Rahman, Norashidah
Yeoh, David
Organization
International Integrated Engineering Summit (IIES)
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Malaysia
Format
Conference Paper
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Push-Out
Notch Connections
Failure
Strength
Stiffness
Ultimate Limit States
Serviceability Limit States
Language
English
Conference
IIES 2014
Research Status
Complete
Notes
December 1-4, 2014, Johor, Malaysia
Summary
The LVL-concrete composite (LCC) structure is a hybrid in system which the LVL member is well connected to the concrete slab by a connector to produce composite action. Various types of connector with different stiffness and shear capacity are available in the market currently. The stiffness of the connector is identified through the push-out experiment. The notch connections for LVL concrete composite beams have higher stiffness and strength compared to mechanical fasteners. This paper discusses the experimental results of symmetrical push-out tests on 3 different types of connector, 150mm rectangular notch with 10mm diameter screw, 100mm rectangular notch with 8mm diameter screw and 100mm triangular notch with 8mm diameter screw. The experimental test was shear push out to failure and the type of failure was discussed. The 150mm rectangular notch was found to be strongest among all and low cost. The 100mm rectangular notch was found to be slightly stiffer than 100mm triangular notch but 100mm triangular notch is easier to construct with only 2 cut. The maximum strength and stiffness at ultimate limit states and serviceability limit states of each type of connection were discussed in this paper.
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Free
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Cross Laminated Timber Construction for Resisting Lateral Loads on Six Level Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1846
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Wood Building Systems
Author
Chapman, John
Publisher
New Zealand Timber Design Society
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
New Zealand
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Resistance
Lateral Load
Stress
Serviceability
Shear
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
New Zealand Timber Design Journal
Online Access
Free
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Effects of Heavy Topping on Vibrational Performance of Cross-Laminated Timber Floor Systems

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2708
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Schwendy, Benjamin
Publisher
Clemson University
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Vibration Serviceability
Concrete Topping
Panels
Insulation
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) is gaining momentum as a competitor to steel and concrete in the construction industry. However, with CLT being relatively new to North America, it is being held back from realizing its full potential by a lack of research in various areas, such as vibration serviceability. This has resulted in vague design guidelines, leading to either overly conservative designs, hurting profit margins, or leading to overly lenient designs, resulting in occupancy discomfort. Eliminating these design inefficiencies is paramount to expanding the use of CLT and creating a more sustainable construction industry. This thesis focuses on the effect of a heavy topping, in this case 2" of concrete over a layer of rigid insulation, on a CLT floor. To this end, modal analysis was performed on two spans of three CLT panels in the Andy Quattlebaum Outdoor Education Center at Clemson University. By performing a series of instrumented heel-drop tests with a roving grid of accelerometers, the natural frequencies, mode shapes, frequency response functions, and damping coefficients were determined. By comparing the results to several different numerical models, the most appropriate model was selected for use in future design. In addition, a walking excitation test was performed to calculate the root mean square acceleration of the floor for comparison to current design standards. This study found that, with a layer of rigid insulation separating the topping and the panel, the system behaved predictably like a non-composite system. The resultant mode shapes also verified that the boundary conditions behaved very close to “hinged” and showed that the combination of the surface splines and the continuous topping provide significant transverse continuity in terms of response to vibrations. Lastly, the results of the walking excitation test showed that, with some further study, the current design standards for steel vibration serviceability can be applied to great effect to CLT systems.
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Free
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Engineers’ Views on Serviceability in Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue858
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Serviceability
Application
Wood Building Systems

Hybrid Cross Laminated Timber Plates (HCLTP) – Numerical Optimisation Modelling and Experimental Tests

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1751
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Sustersic, Iztok
Brank, Boštjan
Dujic, Bruno
Brezocnik, Jaka
Gavric, Igor
Aicher, Simon
Dill-Langer, Gerhard
Winter, Wolfgang
Fadai, Alireza
Demschner, Thomas
Ledinek, Gregor
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Timber Ribs
Concrete Topping
Ultimate Limit States
Serviceability Limit States
Numerical Modelling
Experimental Tests
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 4989-4996
Summary
This paper presents the development of two new types of hybrid cross-laminated timber plates (HCLTP) with an aim to improve structural performance of existing cross-laminated timber plates (Xlam or CLT). The first type are Xlam plates with glued timber ribs and the second type are Xlam plates with a concrete topping. A numerical...
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Laboratory Investigation of Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) Decks for Bridge Applications

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2557
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Bridges and Spans
Organization
Forest Products Laboratory
Iowa State University
Country of Publication
United States
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Bridges and Spans
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Bridge Decks
Serviceability
Structural Performance
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contacts are James Wacker at the Forest Products Laboratory, Justin Dahlberg and Brent Phares at Iowa State University
Summary
The use of cross-laminated timber (CLT) has gained popularity over the past decade, with many advances stemming from completed research and construction projects in Europe. Many inherent advantages of CLT (such as, it is prefabricated, relatively lightweight, dimensionally stable, and environmentally sustainable) have been utilized in vertical construction projects. Despite these advances, the use of CLT in bridge structures has been limited, and the adoption of CLT into governing design codes has been slow. However, CLT shows promise as a complementary or alternative construction material in bridge decks, and additional research would help characterize the structural attributes of CLT decks to guide their use in bridge projects.
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Long-Term Performance of Timber-Concrete Composite Flooring Systems

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue310
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Serviceability
Moisture
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Hailu, Mulugheta
Organization
University of Technology Sydney
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Australia
Format
Thesis
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Serviceability
Moisture
Keywords
Serviceability Limit States
Deflection
Long-term Behaviour
Creep
Mechanosorption
Eurocode
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The objectives and scope of this study are to conduct long-term experimental test on timber-concrete composite beams, analyse the results to determine the creep coefficient of the composite system and compare the experimental results with the analytical solutions in accordance with Eurocode 5, in which the effective modulus method is used to account the effect of creep. To achieve the aforementioned objectives, a long-term laboratory investigation was started in August 2010 on four 5.8m span TCC beams with four different connector types. The specimens have been under sustained loads of 1.7kPa and subjected to a cyclic humidity conditions whilst the temperature remains quasi constant (22 °C). During the test, the mid-span deflection, moisture content of the timber beams and relative humidity of the air are continuously monitored. The long-term test is still continuing, two TCC beams were unloaded and tested to failure after 550 days, while the other two TCC beams are still being monitored and this report included experimental results up to the first 1400 days only. The long-term investigation on the two timber only composite floor beams commenced on March 2013 and the results are reported for the first 800 days from their commencement.
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Free
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16 records – page 1 of 2.