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32 records – page 1 of 4.

Lateral Load Resistance of Cross-Laminated Wood Panels

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2150
Year of Publication
2010
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Popovski, Marjan
Schneider, Johannes
Schweinsteiger, Matthias
Year of Publication
2010
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Keywords
Quasi-Static Tests
Seismic Performance
Screws
Nails
Steel Brackets
Timber Rivets
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Summary
In this paper, some of the results are presented from a series of quasi-static tests on CLT wall panels conducted at FPInnovation-Forintek in Vancouver, BC. CLT wall panels with various configurations and connection details were tested. Wall configurations included single panel walls with three different aspect ratios, multi-panel walls with step joints and different types of screws to connect them, as well as two-storey wall assemblies. Connections for securing the walls to the foundation included: off-the-shelf steel brackets with annular ring nails, spiral nails, and screws; combination of steel brackets and hold-downs; diagonally placed long screws; and custom made brackets with timber rivets. Results showed that CLT walls can have adequate seismic performance when nails or screws are used with the steel brackets. Use of hold-downs with nails on each end of the wall improves its seismic performance. Use of diagonally placed long screws to connect the CLT walls to the floor below is not recommended in high seismic zones due to less ductile wall behaviour. Use of step joints in longer walls can be an effective solution not only to reduce the wall stiffness and thus reduce the seismic input load, but also to improve the wall deformation capabilities. Timber rivets in smaller groups with custom made brackets were found to be effective connectors for CLT wall panels. Further research in this field is needed to further clarify the use of timber rivets in CLT.
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Study on Seismic Performance of Building Structure with Cross Laminated Timber: Part 20: Intensity and Performance of Joint

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue975
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Suzuki, Kei
Goto, Takahiro
Shimizu, Yosuke
Yasumura, Motoi
Kaiko, Naoto
Miyake, Tatsuya
Hamamoto, Takashi
Goto, Hiroshi
Organization
Architectural Institute of Japan
Year of Publication
2013
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Keywords
joint
Seismic Performance
Research Status
Complete
Summary
In this paper, the behaviour of cross-lam (CLT) wall systems under cyclic loads is examined. Experimental investigations of single walls and adjacent wall panels (coupled walls) in terms of cyclic behaviour under lateral loading carried out ìn Italy at IVALSA Trees and Timber Institute and in Canada at FPInnovations are presented. Different classifications of the global behaviour of CLT wall systems are introduced. Typical failure mechanisms are discussed and provisions for a proper CLT wall seismic design are given. The influences of different types of global behaviour on mechanical properties and energy dissipation of the CLT wall systems are critically discussed. The outcomes of this experimental study provides better understanding of the seismic behaviour and energy dissipation capacities of CLT wall systems.
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Study on Seismic Performance of Building Construction with Cross Laminated Timber: Part 17: Displacement Measurement by Image Processing

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue978
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Iizuka, Takuaki
Yasushi, Niitsu
Hamamoto, Takashi
Miyake, Tatsuya
Gosei, Murakami
Yahaura, Sota
Kaiko, Naoto
Organization
Architectural Institute of Japan
Year of Publication
2013
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Image Processing
Displacement
Seismic Performance
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) structures exhibit satisfactory performance under seismic conditions. This ispossible because of the high strength-to-weight ratio and in-plane stiffness of the CLT panels, and the capacity ofconnections to resist the loads with ductile deformations and limited impairment of strength. This study sum-marises a part of the activities conducted by the Working Group 2 of COST Action FP1402, by presenting an in-depth review of the research works that have analysed the seismic behaviour of CLT structural systems. Thefirstpart of the paper discusses the outcomes of the testing programmes carried out in the lastfifteen years anddescribes the modelling strategies recommended in the literature. The second part of the paper introduces theq-behaviour factor of CLT structures and provides capacity-based principles for their seismic design.
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Study on Seismic Performance of Building Structure with Cross Laminated Timber: Part 13: Relative Story Displacement of Full Scale 3-Story Model -Comparisons with Shaking Table Test

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue982
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Yahaura, Sota
Goto, Hiroshi
Hamamoto, Takashi
Gosei, Murakami
Miyake, Tatsuya
Matsumoto, Kazuyuki
Kaiko, Naoto
Organization
Architectural Institute of Japan
Year of Publication
2013
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Static Load Tests
Shaking Table Test
Shear Force
Seismic Performance
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The material presented in this paper refers to a part of the investigation on cross-laminated (XLam) wall panel systems subjected to seismic excitation, carried out within the bilateral project realized by the Institute of Earthquake Engineering and Engineering Seismology (IZIIS) and the Faculty of Civil and Geodetic Engineering at the University of Ljubljana (UL FCGE). The full program of the research consista of basic tests of small XLam wooden blocks and quasi-static tests of anchors, then quasi-static tests of full-scale wall panels with given anchors, shaking-table tests of two types of XLam systems including ambient-vibration tests, and finally analytical research for the definition of the computational model for the analysis of these structural systems. In this paper, the full-scale shaking-table tests for one XLam system type (i.e. specimen 1 consisting of two single-unit massive wooden XLam panels) that have been performed in the IZIIS laboratory are discussed. The principal objectives of the shaking-table tests have been to get an insight into the behavior of the investigated XLam panel systems under seismic excitations, develop a physical and practical computational model for simutalion of the dynamic response based on the tests, and finally correlate the results with those from the previously performed quasi-static tests on the same wooden panel types. The obtained experimental results have been verified using a proposed computational model that included new contitutive relationships for anchors and contact zones between panels and foundations. Because a reasonable agreement between the numerical and experimental results has been achieved, the proposed computational model is expected to provide a solid basis for future research on the practical design of these relatively new materials and systems.
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Study on Seismic Performance of Building Structure with Cross Laminated Timber: Part 12: Objective and Loading Procedure and Accuracy of Static Loading Test

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue983
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Kaiko, Naoto
Hamamoto, Takashi
Gosei, Murakami
Yahaura, Sota
Miyake, Tatsuya
Goto, Hiroshi
Nakagawa, Takafumi
Yasumura, Motoi
Organization
Architectural Institute of Japan
Year of Publication
2013
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Static Loading Test
Failure Behavior
Shear Force
Seismic Performance
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is a relatively new heavy timber construction material (also referred to as massive timber) that originated in central Europe and quickly spread to building applications around the world over the past two decades. Using dimension lumber (typically in the range of 1× or 2× sizes) glue laminated with each lamination layer oriented at 90° to the adjacent layer, CLT panels can be manufactured into virtually any size (with one dimension limited by the width of the press), precut and pregrooved into desirable shapes, and then shipped to the construction site for quick installation. Panelized CLT buildings are robust in resisting gravity load (compared to light-frame wood buildings) because CLT walls are effectively like solid wood pieces in load bearing. The design of CLT for gravity is relatively straightforward for residential and light commercial applications where there are plenty of wall lines in the floor plan. However, the behavior of panelized CLT systems under lateral load is not well understood especially when there is high seismic demand. Compared to light-frame wood shear walls, it is relatively difficult for panelized CLT shear walls to achieve similar levels of lateral deflection without paying special attention to design details, i.e., connections. A design lacking ductility or energy dissipating mechanism will result in high acceleration amplifications and excessive global overturning demands for multistory buildings, and even more so for tall wood buildings. Although a number of studies have been conducted on CLT shear walls and building assemblies since the 1990s, the wood design community’s understanding of the seismic behavior of panelized CLT systems is still in the learning phase, hence the impetus for this article and the tall CLT building workshop, which will be introduced herein. For example, there has been a recent trend in engineering to improve resiliency, which seeks to design a building system such that it can be restored to normal functionality sooner after an earthquake than previously possible, i.e., it is a resilient system. While various resilient lateral system concepts have been explored for concrete and steel construction, this concept has not yet been realized for multistory CLT systems. This forum article presents a review of past research developments on CLT as a lateral force-resisting system, the current trend toward design and construction of tall buildings with CLT worldwide, and attempts to summarize the societal needs and challenges in developing resilient CLT construction in regions of high seismicity in the United States.
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Progress on the Development of Strong Seismic Resilient Tall CLT Buildings in the Pacific Northwest

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1881
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Pei, Shiling
Berman, Jeffrey
Dolan, Daniel
van de Lindt, John
Ricles, James
Sause, Richard
Blomgren, Hans-Erik
Popovski, Marjan
Rammer, Douglas
Year of Publication
2014
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Tall Wood
Seismic Performance
Resilience-Based Seismic Design
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Summary
As urban densification occurs in U.S. regions of high seismicity, there is a natural demand for seismically resilient tall buildings that are reliable, economically viable, and can be rapidly constructed. In urban regions on the west coast of the U.S., specifically the Pacific Northwest, there is significant interest in utilizing CLT in 8-20 story residential and commercial buildings due to its appeal as a potential locally sourced, sustainable and economically competitive building material. In this study, results from a multi-disciplinary discussion on the feasibility and challenges in enabling tall CLT building for the U.S. market were summarized. A three-tiered seismic performance expectations that can be implemented for tall CLT buildings was proposed to encourage the adoption of the system at a practical level. A road map for building tall CLT building in the U.S. was developed, together with three innovative conceptual CLT systems that can help reaching resiliency goals. This study is part of an on-going multi-institution research project funded by National Science Foundation.
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Ductility Based Force Reduction Factors for Symmetrical Cross-Laminated Timber Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue446
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Walls
Author
Popovski, Marjan
Pei, Shiling
van de Lindt, John
Karacabeyli, Erol
Organization
European Association of Earthquake Engineering
Year of Publication
2014
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Walls
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Keywords
Force Modification Factors
Ductility
National Building Code of Canada
Fasteners
Seismic Performance
Conference
Second European Conference on Earthquake Engineering and Seismology
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 25-29, 2014, Istanbul, Turkey
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) as a structural system has not been fully introduced in European or North American building codes. One of the most important issues for designers of CLT structures in earthquake prone regions when equivalent static design procedure is used, are the values for the force modification factors (R-factors) for this structural system. Consequently, the objective of this study was to derive suitable ductility-based force modification factors (Rd-factors) for seismic design of CLT buildings for the National Building Code of Canada (NBCC). For that purpose, the six-storey NEESWood Capstone wood-frame building was redesigned as a CLT structure and was used as a reference symmetrical structure for the analyses. The same floor plan was used to develop models for ten and fifteen storey buildings. Non-linear analytical models of the buildings designed with different Rd-factors were developed using the SAPWood computer program. CLT walls were modelled using the output from mechanics models developed in Matlab that were verified against CLT wall tests conducted at FPInnovations. Two design methodologies for determining the CLT wall design resistance (to include and exclude the influence of the hold-downs), were used. To study the effects of fastener behaviour on the R-factors, three different fasteners (16d nails, 4x70mm and 5x90mm screws) used to connect the CLT walls, were used in the analyses. Each of the 3-D building models was subjected to a series of 22 bi-axial input earthquake motions suggested in the FEMA P-695 procedure. Based on the results, the fragility curves were developed for the analysed buildings. Results showed that an Rd-factor of 2.0 is appropriate conservative estimate for the symmetrical CLT buildings studied, for the chosen level of seismic performance.
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Development and Testing of an Alternative Dissipative Posttensioned Rocking Timber Wall with Boundary Columns

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1884
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Application
Frames
Walls
Author
Sarti, Francesco
Palermo, Alessandro
Pampanin, Stefano
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Journal Article
Application
Frames
Walls
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Pres-Lam
Prestress
Post-Tensioning
Displacement
Seismic Performance
Column-Wall-Column
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Structural Engineering
Summary
The unbonded post-tensioned rocking and dissipative technology was first developed as the main outcome of the PRESSS (PREcast Seismic Structural Systems) Program in US. After the first developments and significant refinement, the technology was extended to steel and, more recently, timber structures. The timber version, referred to as Pres-Lam (Prestressed laminated) system can be either implemented for timber walls (single or coupled) or frames or combination of the above, with unbonded post-tensioning and supplemental dissipation devices. In unbonded post-tensioned dissipative wall systems a combination of re-centering capacity and energy dissipation leads to a “controlled rocking” mechanism which develops a gap opening at the wall base. This generates an uplift displacement which is transferred to the floor diaphragm. This vertical displacement incompatibility can represent a potential issue if the connection detailing between floor and lateral resisting system is not designed properly. The same issue can be mitigated by adopting an alternative configuration of the rocking/dissipative wall system, based on the use of a column-wall-column post-tensioned connection. This concept, originally proposed for precast concrete walls and referred to as PreWEC (Prestressed Wall with End Column), has been extended and adapted to posttensioned timber structures and validated through experimental testing. The paper presents the design, detailing and experimental testing of a two-thirds scale wall specimen of this alternative configuration. Different wall configurations are considered in terms of post-tensioning initial force as well as dissipation devices layout. The experimental results confirm the excellent seismic performance of the system with the possibility to adopt multiple alternative configurations.
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Determination of Seismic Performance Factors for CLT Shear Wall Systems

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue770
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Amini, M. Omar
van de Lindt, John
Rammer, Douglas
Pei, Shiling
Line, Philip
Popovski, Marjan
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Keywords
Angle Bracket
Cyclic Tests
US
Quasi-Static
Seismic Performance Factors
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria
Summary
This paper presents selected results of connector testing and wall testing which were part of a Forest Products Lab-funded project undertaken at Colorado State University in an effort to determine seismic performance factors for cross laminated timber (CLT) shear walls in the United States. Archetype development, which is required as part of the process, is also discussed. Connector tests were performed on generic angle brackets which were tested under shear and uplift and performed as expected with consistent nail withdrawal observed. Quasi-static cyclic tests were conducted on CLT shear walls to systematically investigate the effects of various parameters. Boundary constraints and gravity loading were both found to have a beneficial effect on the wall performance, i.e. higher strength and deformation capacity. Specific gravity also had a significant effect on wall behaviour while CLT thickness was less influential. Higher aspect ratio panels (4:1) demonstrated lower stiffness and substantially larger deformation capacity compared to moderate aspect ratio panels (2:1). However, based on the test results there is likely a lower bound of 2:1 for aspect ratio where it ceases to have any beneficial effect on wall behaviour. This is likely due to the transition from the dominant rocking behaviour to sliding behaviour.
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Design of a "Mass-Timber" Building with Different Seismic Bracing Technologies

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1900
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Frames
Author
Fini, Giulio
Pozza, Luca
Loss, Cristiano
Tannert, Thomas
Publisher
ANIDIS Earthquake Engineering in Italy
Year of Publication
2017
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Frames
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Timber Frames
Prefabrication
Seismic Performance
Conference
17th ANIDIS Conference
Research Status
Complete
Notes
September 17-21, 2017, Pistoia, Italy
Summary
The construction of mid- and high-rise wooden buildings has attracted more attention in the last decade, particularly due to the utilization of engineered materials and related construction methods. The wood industry offers a wide range of engineered wood products, such as glue-laminated timber (GLT), cross-laminated timber (CLT) or timber concrete composites (TCC), which have improved mechanical qualities and the freedom to select shapes and sizes. As a consequence, attention has shifted to solve structural design issues to meet specific building requirements, such as their seismic, fire and serviceability performance. The objective of this work is to explore some of the technologies currently available for wooden mid-rise buildings using a 5-storeys case study building under gravity and earthquake loads. An innovative construction method, obtained by combining TCC floors, CLT shear-walls and GLT columns to ensure a fast erection on site is presented and the building response analyzed by means of static and dynamic seismic analyses. Specifically, the gravity load resisting system was designed to meet ultimate and serviceability limit state requirements according to Eurocode. Different seismic bracing technologies are compared: CLT cores (i) and hybridized cores with (ii) post-tensioned tendons and (iii) steel link-beams.
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32 records – page 1 of 4.