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6 records – page 1 of 1.

Effect of Realistic Boundary Conditions on the Behaviour of Cross-Laminated Timber Elements Subjected to Simulated Blast Loads

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2361
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Author
Cote, Dominic
Publisher
University of Ottawa
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Connections
Seismic Load
Blast Loads
Fasteners
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is an emerging engineered wood product in North America. Past research effort to establish the behaviour of CLT under extreme loading conditions has focussed CLT slabs with idealized simply-supported boundary conditions. Connections between the wall and the floor systems above and below are critical to fully describing the overall behaviour of CLT structures when subjected to blast loads. The current study investigates the effects of “realistic” boundary conditions on the behaviour of cross-laminated timber walls when subjected to simulated out-of-plane blast loads. The methodology followed in the current research consists of experimental and analytical components. The experimental component was conducted in the Blast Research Laboratory at the University of Ottawa, where shock waves were applied to the specimens. Configurations with seismic detailing were considered, in order to evaluate whether existing structures that have adequate capacities to resist high seismic loads would also be capable of resisting a blast load with reasonable damage. In addition, typical connections used in construction to resist gravity and lateral loads, as well as connections designed specifically to resist a given blast load were investigated. The results indicate that the detailing of the connections appears to significantly affect the behaviour of the CLT slab. Typical detailing for platform construction where long screws connect the floor slab to the wall in end grain performed poorly and experienced brittle failure through splitting in the perpendicular to grain direction in the CLT. Bearing type connections generally behaved well and yielding in the fasteners and/or angles brackets meant that a significant portion of the energy was dissipated there reducing the energy imparted on the CLT slab significantly. Hence less displacement and thereby damage was observed in the slab. The study also concluded that using simplified tools such as single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) models together with current available material models for CLT is not sufficient to adequately describe the behaviour and estimate the damage. More testing and development of models with higher fidelity are required in order to develop robust tools for the design of CLT element subjected to blast loading.
Online Access
Free
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Feasibility Study of Using Cross-Laminated Timber Core for the UBC Tall Wood Building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1262
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Moudgil, Manu
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Concrete Core
Seismic Loading
National Building Code of Canada
Mass Timber Core
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Mass-timber has gained popularity in the construction of mid-rise buildings in the last decade. The innovation of constructing tall buildings with mass-timber can be seen in the student residence at Brock Commons built in 2016 at the University of British Columbia. It is the world’s tallest timber hybrid building with 18 stories and 53 meters’ height above the ground level. The building has 17 stories of mass-timber superstructure resting on a concrete podium with two concrete cores that act as a lateral force resisting system for earthquake and wind forces. The mass-timber superstructure of 17 stories took ten weeks whereas the concrete cores were built in fourteen weeks. There could have been a substantial reduction in the project timeline leading to cost savings, if mass-timber was used for the cores. The motivation for concrete cores was driven by the sole purpose of easier approval procedure. The objective of this thesis was to evaluate the possibility to design the Brock Commons building using mass-timber cores. First, the procedure for the approvals for tall timber buildings by understanding the code compliance for Brock Commons is discussed. Then, the actual building with concrete cores is modeled, with the model being calibrated with the results from the structural engineers of record. These concrete cores are then replaced by the same configuration using Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) cores to investigate the structural feasibility of Brock Commons with a mass-timber core. The results presented herein show that Brock Commons with CLT core having the same dimensions and configuration is unstable under seismic loading for Vancouver, BC, as specified by National Building of Canada 2015. However, when the configuration and thickness of CLT cores are changed, the structure can meet the seismic performance criteria as per the code.
Online Access
Free
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High-Capacity Hold-Down for Tall Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1529
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Wood Building Systems
Author
Zhang, Xiaoyue
Popovski, Marjan
Tannert, Thomas
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Holz-Stahl-Komposit
Hold-Down
Seismic Load
Strength
Stiffness
Ductility
Failure Mechanisms
Quasi-Static
Monotonic Loading
Reverse Cyclic Loading
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 725-732
Summary
The structural use of wood in North America is dominated by light wood-frame construction used in low-rise and – more recently – mid-rise residential buildings. Mass timber engineered wood products such as laminatedveneer-lumber and cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels enable to use the material in tall and large wood and woodbased hybrid buildings. The prospect of constructing taller buildings creates challenges, one of them being the increasein lateral forces created by winds and earthquakes, thus requiring stronger hold-down devices. This paper summarises the experimental investigation on the performance a high-capacity hold-down for resisting seismic loads in tall timberbased structural systems. The connection consists of the Holz-Stahl-Komposit-System (HSK)™ glued into CLT with the modification that ductile steel yielding was allowed to occur inside the CLT panel. The strength, stiffness, ductility and failure mechanisms of this connection were evaluated under quasi-static monotonic and reversed cyclic loading. The results demonstrate that the modified hold-down-assembly provides a possible solution for use in tall timber-based structures in high seismic zones
Online Access
Free
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Seismic Design of Core-Wall Systems for Multi-Storey Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1149
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shafts and Chases
Author
Dunbar, Andrew
Organization
University of Canterbury
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
New Zealand
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shafts and Chases
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Post-Tensioned
Core-Walls
Quasi-Static
Seismic Loading
Multi-Storey
U-Shaped Flexural Plates
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This thesis discusses the results of experimental tests on two post-tensioned timber core-walls, tested under bi-directional quasi-static seismic loading. The half-scale two-storey test specimens included a stair with half-flight landings. Multi-storey timber structures are becoming increasingly desirable for architects and building owners due to their aesthetic and environmental benefits. In addition, there is increasing public pressure to have low damage structural systems with minimal business interruption after a moderate to severe seismic event. Timber has been used extensively for low-rise residential structures in the past, but has been utilised much less for multi-storey structures, traditionally limited to residential type building layouts which use light timber framing and include many walls to form a lateral load resisting system. This is undesirable for multi-storey commercial buildings which need large open spaces providing building owners with versatility in their desired floor plan. The use of Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) panels for multi-storey timber buildings is gaining popularity throughout the world, especially for residential construction. Previous experimental testing has been done on the in-plane behaviour of single and coupled post-tensioned timber walls at the University of Canterbury and elsewhere. However, there has been very little research done on the 3D behaviour of timber walls that are orthogonal to each other and no research to date into post-tensioned CLT walls. The “high seismic option” consisted of full height post-tensioned CLT walls coupled with energy dissipating U-shaped Flexural Plates (UFPs) attached at the vertical joints between coupled wall panels and between wall panels and the steel corner columns. An alternative “low seismic option” consisted of post-tensioned CLT panels connected by screws, to provide a semi-rigid connection, allowing relative movement between the panels, producing some level of frictional energy dissipation.
Online Access
Free
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Shaking Table Testing of a Multi-Storey Post-Tensioned Glulam Building: Preliminary Experimental Results

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1854
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Beams
Columns

Study of the Seismic Behavior of a Solid Wood Frame Subjected to Cyclic Tests

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2669
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Application
Frames
Organization
Université Laval
Country of Publication
Canada
Application
Frames
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Cyclic Tests
Seismic Loading
Energy Dissipation
Braced Frames
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Jean Proulx at Université Laval
Summary
The main objective of the research project is to evaluate the behavior of a column, beam and bracing connection under dynamic stresses. It will therefore be necessary to obtain in the laboratory the properties used for the optimization and the better understanding of a braced frame resistant to lateral forces. The assembly will transfer the lateral loads applied to the structure, to the foundations of a building. The capacity of the frame to dissipate energy under seismic loading will be evaluated by cyclic tests. Any structure must be able to dissipate energy under dynamic loads (earthquakes, wind) and the demand for ductility in assemblies is considerable in braced frame structures. This project will characterize the behavior of beam, column and bracing connections. The results obtained can be used by the partner for the seismic design of solid wood structures using this type of braced frame. Optimization and a better understanding of the dynamic behavior of these assemblies will also increase the safety of solid wood structures, and promote their acceptance in this developing market.
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6 records – page 1 of 1.