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3 records – page 1 of 1.

Carbon Footprint Benchmarking of BC Multi-Unit Residential Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2159
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems

Force Based Design Guideline for Timber-Steel Hybrid Structures: Steel Moment Resisting Frames with CLT Infill Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue83
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Tesfamariam, Solomon
Stiemer, Siegfried
Bezabeh, Matiyas
Goertz, Caleb
Popovski, Marjan
Goda, Katsuichiro
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Overstrength
Ductility
National Building Code of Canada
Timber-Steel Hybrid
Office Buildings
Residential Buildings
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Provincial code changes have been made to allow construction of light wood-frame buildings up to 6 storeys in order to satisfy the urban housing demand in western Canadian cities. It started in 2009 when the BC Building Code was amended to increase the height limit for wood-frame structures from four to six. Recently, provinces of Quebec, Ontario and Alberta followed suit. While wood-frame construction is limited to six storeys, some innovative wood-hybrid systems can go to greater heights. In this report, a feasibility study of timber-based hybrid buildings is described as carried out by The University of British Columbia (UBC) in collaboration with FPInnovations. This project, funded through BC Forestry Innovation Investment's (FII) Wood First Program, had an objective to develop design guidelines for a new steel-timber hybrid structural system that can be used as part of the next generation "steel-timber hybrid structures" that is limited in scope to 20 storey office or residential buildings. ...
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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A Study of the Viability of Cross Laminated Timber for Residential Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2358
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
General Application
Author
Smyth, Max
Publisher
KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
Sweden
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
General Application
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Residential Buildings
Construction
Sustainability
Carbon
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This report presents an overview into cross laminated timber (CLT) as a construction material and how it compares to traditional methods of construction. CLT is also examined in the context of a move to off-site manufacturing (OSM) and a greater emphasis on sustainability in the construction sector. In this context it is found to perform well with mass timber products such as CLT being the only carbon negative building materials capable of building mid and high-rise buildings. The barriers and opportunities for CLT are explored looking at literature, industry reports and case studies. The main barriers to wider use of CLT still come from uncertainties around the material. Although they have been proven to not be a problem, worries over issues such as how it performs during fires and the lifetime of buildings persist. A lack of standardisation may be the primary cause for this as a range of products and specifications across different manufactures and countries creates confusion and means that each building needs to be individually specified. The opportunities identified for CLT include its carbon saving properties which could benefit governments wanting to reach their carbon reduction targets. In addition, the ability to use CLT on a wider range of sites such as unstable brownfield land and over service tunnels lends to its strength in aiding with urban densification. In terms of costs, these are found to be comparable to those of traditional construction methods with high material costs being offset by reduced foundations and construction time. CLT buildings do, however, face a premium in insurance costs. Transport costs, resulting from a concentrated production base in central Europe, also add a considerable amount to the overall cost of the finished product. This in turn encourages domestic production in countries outside of Europe. The possibilities for CLT in the UK residential construction market are investigated with a focus on mid-rise and high-rise flat construction as that is what the economics and material properties of CLT most lend itself to. Although CLT currently has a low market share of less than 0.1% of homes in this sector there is the potential for this to increase to 20-60% over time. The lower range of this estimate is not predicted to be reached before 2035 and this is also dependant on rising CLT production levels. The volume of timber that is needed to manufacture enough CLT to reach these increased construction volumes can be sourced sustainably from existing forests production in Europe and North America. In addition, the UK has enough excess timber harvesting capacity to provide for the entirety of CLT buildings in the UK, however, large scale domestic CLT production is required to make this a reality.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail