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10 records – page 1 of 1.

Design and Testing of Post-Tensioned Timber Wall Systems

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue696
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Walls
Author
Sarti, Francesco
Palermo, Alessandro
Pampanin, Stefano
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Multi-Storey
Pres-Lam
Energy Dissipation
Quasi-Static Test
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
The paper presents the design and detailing, and the experimental quasi-static 2/3 scale tests of two posttensioned wall systems: a single (more traditional) wall system (Figure 2) and a new configuration comprising of a column-wall-column coupled system (Figure 3). The latter allows avoiding displacement incompatibilities issues between the wall and the diaphragm by using the boundary columns as supports.
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Experimental and Numerical Analyses of New Massive Wooden Shear-Wall Systems

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue93
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Pozza, Luca
Scotta, Roberto
Trutalli, Davide
Pinna, Mario
Polastri, Andrea
Bertoni, Paolo
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Switzerland
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Quasi-Static
Cyclic Loading Tests
Numerical model
Ductility
Eurocode 8
Behaviour Factor
Dissipative Capacity
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Buildings
ISSN
2075-5309
Summary
Three innovative massive wooden shear-wall systems (Cross-Laminated-Glued Wall, Cross-Laminated-Stapled Wall, Layered Wall with dovetail inserts) were tested and their structural behaviour under seismic action was assessed with numerical simulations. The wall specimens differ mainly in the method used to assemble the layers of timber boards composing them. Quasi-static cyclic loading tests were carried out and then reproduced with a non-linear numerical model calibrated on the test results to estimate the most appropriate behaviour factor for each system. Non-linear dynamic simulations of 15 artificially generated seismic shocks showed that these systems have good dissipative capacity when correctly designed and that they can be assigned to the medium ductility class of Eurocode 8. This work also shows the influence of deformations in wooden panels and base connectors on the behaviour factor and dissipative capacity of the system.
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Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Novel Steel-Timber-Hybrid System

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue81
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Bhat, Pooja
Azim, Riasat
Popovski, Marjan
Tannert, Thomas
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Connections
Keywords
Tall Wood
Timber-Steel Hybrid
FFTT
Quasi-Static
Monotonic Testing
Cyclic Testing
Strong-column Weak-beam Failure
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
This paper summarises the experimental and numerical investigation conducted on the main connection of a novel steel-timber hybrid system called FFTT. The component behaviour of the hybrid system was investigated using quasi-static monotonic and reversed cyclic tests. Different steel profiles (wide flange I-sections and hollow rectangular sections) and embedment approaches for the steel profiles (partial and full embedment) were tested. The results demonstrated that when using an appropriate connection layout, the desired strong-column weak-beam failure mechanism was initiated and excessive wood crushing was avoided. A numerical model was developed that reasonably reflected the real component behaviour and can subsequently be used for numerical sensitivity studies and parameter optimization. The research presented herein serves as a precursor for providing design guidance for the FFTT system as an option for tall wood-hybrid buildings in seismic regions.
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High Performance Cross-Laminated-Timber Shear Connection with Self-Tapping Screw Assemblies

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue504
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Danzig, Ilana
Closen, Maximilian
Tannert, Thomas
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Self-Tapping Screws
Panels
Full Scale
Quasi-Static
Reverse Cyclic Loading
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
The research presented in this paper examines the performance of a shear connection using self-tapping screws (STS) in 3-ply Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) panels. CLT panels were connected with STS assemblies at an inclined angle in two directions. The capacity of the STS assemblies was tested for the purpose of designing a CLT roof diaphragm of a large storage facility where a high-performance and low-manufacturing-cost solution was required. A total of eleven full-scale specimens were subjected to quasi-static and reversed-cyclic shear loading. Resulting forcedisplacement and hysteretic curves were used to determine an equivalent energy elastic-plastic curve based on ASTM E2126-11 procedures to estimate assembly yield strength, yield displacement, and ductility ratio. The performance in terms of strength and stiffness was excellent, and the STS provided the required ductility for the system to be used in seismic applications. Static yield strength averaged 80kN/m with an average ductility ratio of 7.7 while cyclic yield strength averaged 68kN/m with an average ductility ratio of 4.1. The data obtained allows engineers to specify low-cost lateral load resisting connection systems for large scale CLT structures.
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Numerical and Experimental Investigations of Connection for Timber-Steel Hybrid System

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue213
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Azim, Riasat
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Keywords
FFTT
Mid-Rise
Timber-Steel Hybrid
Quasi-Static
Monotonic Testing
Reverse Cyclic Testing
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
In recent years, hybrid systems have grown in popularity as potential solution for mid-rise construction. There is also an increased interest in using timber for such systems. The lack of established design guidance, however, has tabled the practical implementation of timber-based hybrid structures. The aim of this thesis is to address the existing knowledge gap regarding the detailed connection design of hybrid systems through combined experimental and numerical investigations on a novel timber-steel system called “FFTT”. The FFTT system relies on wall panels of mass timber such as Cross-Laminated-Timber (CLT) for gravity and lateral load resistance and embedded steel beam sections to provide ductility under seismic loading. A vital step towards practical implementation of the FFTT system is to obtain the proof that the connections facilitate the desired ‘strong column – weak beam’ failure mechanism. The numerical work applied the software ANSYS; a parametric study based on the results of previous tests was conducted to obtain a suitable connection configuration for improved structural performance. The experimental work, carried out at FPInnovations, consisted of quasi-static monotonic and reversed cyclic tests on two different connection configurations: fully and partially embedded ASTM wide flange sections in combination with 7 ply CLT panels. The combination of partial embedment length and full embedment depth, even when using the smallest wide flange section, did not facilitate the desired behavior. The connection performance was significantly improved when reducing the embedment depth (to avoid creating stress peaks on a weak cross layer) and increasing the embedment length (larger center to center distance between bearing plates). The used small size steel beam, however, is not practical for a real structure; therefore, further studies with larger beams and a modified geometry are recommended before the FFTT system can be applied in practice.
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Performance and Design of LVL Walls Coupled with UFP Dissipaters

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue195
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Seismic
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Iqbal, Asif
Pampanin, Stefano
Palermo, Alessandro
Buchanan, Andrew
Publisher
Taylor&Francis Online
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
United Kingdom
Format
Journal Article
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Cyclic
Energy Dissipation
Multi-Storey
Post-Tensioned
U-Shaped Flexural Plates
Quasi-Static
Pseudo-dynamic
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Earthquake Engineering
Notes
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13632469.2014.987406
Summary
This article presents recent research on the seismic resistance of coupled post-tensioned timber walls for use in multi-story buildings. The walls are constructed from laminated veneer lumber (LVL), post-tensioned with unbonded vertical tendons, and coupled together with mild steel U-shaped flexural plates (UFPs) as energy dissipating elements. The timber wall design follows the same principles as used for post-tensioned precast concrete wall systems, using U-shaped plates to obtain a “hybrid” system, where energy is dissipated through yielding of the plates, while the vertical post-tensioning provides the restoring force. In this project, the same principles are applied to timber coupled walls. A series of quasi-static cyclic and pseudo-dynamic tests have been carried out to verify the applicability of the concept and the feasibility of the construction technology in timber buildings. The U-shaped plates showed stable energy dissipation characteristics and, in combination with the post-tensioning, desirable re-centering hysteretic behavior typically referred to as “flag-shape”. Because of the simplicity of these elements and the low cost of implementation, they have good prospects for practical application.
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Performance of Two-Storey CLT House Subjected to Lateral Loads

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue376
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Popovski, Marjan
Gavric, Igor
Schneider, Johannes
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Keywords
Lateral Loads
North America
Building Codes
Full Scale
Quasi-Static
Monotonic Loading
Cyclic Loading
Failure Mechanism
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The work presented in this report is a continuation of the FPInnovations' research project on determining the performance of the CLT as a structural system under lateral loads. A two storey full-scale model of a CLT house was tested under quasi-static monotonic and cyclic lateral loading in two directions, one direction at a time. In total five tests were performed; one push-over and two cyclic tests were conducted in the longer symmetrical direction (E-W), and two cyclic tests were performed in the shorter asymmetrical direction (N-S). In addition, before and after each test, natural frequencies of the house in both directions were measured. The main objective of the tests was to investigate 3-D system behaviour of the CLT structure subjected to lateral loads. The CLT structure subjected to lateral loads performed according to the design objectives.
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Quasi Static Cyclic Tests of 2/3 Scale Post-Tensioned Timber Wall and Column-Wall-Column (CWC) Systems

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue648
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Seismic
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Walls
Author
Sarti, Francesco
Palermo, Alessandro
Pampanin, Stefano
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
New Zealand
Format
Conference Paper
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Post-Tensioned
Quasi-Static Testing
Column-Wall-Column
Steel
U-Shaped Flexural Plates
Displacement
Language
English
Conference
New Zealand Society for Earthquake Engineering Conference
Research Status
Complete
Notes
March 21-23, 2014, Auckland, New Zealand
Summary
The paper presents the design and construction detailing of the quasi-static testing of two post-tensioned timber wall systems: a single (more traditional) wall system and a new configuration comprising of a column-wall-column coupled system (CWC). The latter allows avoiding displacement incompatibilities issues between the wall and the diaphragm by using the boundary columns as supports. Different reinforcement configurations were taken into account for both the wall systems; the walls were subjected to different initial post-tensioning stress levels, and different dissipater options were considered: both internal and external replaceable mild steel tension-compression yield fuses, and U-shape Flexural Plates (UFPs) were used for the single wall and the CWC solutions respectively. The experimental results showed the high-performance of both post-tensioned timber wall systems with negligible level of structural damage in the wall element and residual displacements and high level of dissipation.
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Seismic Design of Core-Wall Systems for Multi-Storey Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1149
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shafts and Chases
Author
Dunbar, Andrew
Organization
University of Canterbury
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
New Zealand
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shafts and Chases
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Post-Tensioned
Core-Walls
Quasi-Static
Seismic Loading
Multi-Storey
U-Shaped Flexural Plates
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This thesis discusses the results of experimental tests on two post-tensioned timber core-walls, tested under bi-directional quasi-static seismic loading. The half-scale two-storey test specimens included a stair with half-flight landings. Multi-storey timber structures are becoming increasingly desirable for architects and building owners due to their aesthetic and environmental benefits. In addition, there is increasing public pressure to have low damage structural systems with minimal business interruption after a moderate to severe seismic event. Timber has been used extensively for low-rise residential structures in the past, but has been utilised much less for multi-storey structures, traditionally limited to residential type building layouts which use light timber framing and include many walls to form a lateral load resisting system. This is undesirable for multi-storey commercial buildings which need large open spaces providing building owners with versatility in their desired floor plan. The use of Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) panels for multi-storey timber buildings is gaining popularity throughout the world, especially for residential construction. Previous experimental testing has been done on the in-plane behaviour of single and coupled post-tensioned timber walls at the University of Canterbury and elsewhere. However, there has been very little research done on the 3D behaviour of timber walls that are orthogonal to each other and no research to date into post-tensioned CLT walls. The “high seismic option” consisted of full height post-tensioned CLT walls coupled with energy dissipating U-shaped Flexural Plates (UFPs) attached at the vertical joints between coupled wall panels and between wall panels and the steel corner columns. An alternative “low seismic option” consisted of post-tensioned CLT panels connected by screws, to provide a semi-rigid connection, allowing relative movement between the panels, producing some level of frictional energy dissipation.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Seismic Performance of Core-Walls for Multi-Storey Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue61
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Dunbar, Andrew
Pampanin, Stefano
Buchanan, Andrew
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
New Zealand
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Connections
Multi-Storey
Post-Tensioned
Quasi-Static
Half-Scale
Language
English
Conference
New Zealand Society for Earthquake Engineering Conference
Research Status
Complete
Notes
March 21-23, 2014, Auckland, New Zealand
Summary
This paper describes the results of experimental tests on two posttensioned timber core-walls tested under bi-directional quasi-static seismic loading. The half-scale two-storey test specimens included a stair with half-flight landings. The use of Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) panels for multi-storey timber buildings is gaining popularity throughout the world, especially for residential construction. Posttensioned timber core-walls for lift-shafts or stairwells can be used for seismic resistance in open-plan commercial office buildings Previous experimental testing has been done on the in-plane behaviour of single and coupled timber walls at the University of Canterbury and elsewhere. However, there has been very little research done on the 3D behaviour of timber walls that are orthogonal to each other, and no research to date into post-tensioned CLT walls. The “high seismic option” consisted of full height post-tensioned CLT walls coupled with energy dissipating U-shaped Flexural Plates (UFPs) attached at the vertical joints between coupled wall panels and between wall panels and the steel corner columns. An alternative “low seismic option” consisted of post-tensioned CLT panels connected by screws, to provide a semi-rigid connection, allowing relative movement between the panels, producing some level of frictional energy dissipation.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.