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16 records – page 1 of 2.

Adaptation of Advanced High R-Factor Bracing Systems into Heavy Timber Frames

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1760
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Author
Gilbert, Colin
Erochko, Jeffrey
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Quasi-Static
Cyclic Testing
Ductility
Damping Devices
R-factors
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 5068-5077
Summary
Timber provides attractive earthquake performance characteristics for regions of high seismic risk, particularly its high strength-to-weight ratio; however, current timber structural systems are associated with relatively low design force reduction factors due to their low inherent ductility when compared to high-performance concrete and steel...
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Blast Testing of Loaded Cross-Laminated Timber Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1234
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Weaver, Mark
Newberry, Charles
Podesto, Lisa
O’Laughlin, Casey
Organization
Structures Congress
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Keywords
Blast Tests
Airblast Loads
Axial Load
Panels
Load Distribution
Quasi-Static
Language
English
Conference
Structures Conference 2018
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 19–21, 2018, Fort Worth, Texas
Summary
Results from a series of blast tests performed in October 2016 on three two-story, single-bay cross-laminated timber (CLT) structures demonstrated the ability of CLT construction to resist airblast loads in a predictable fashion. These tests were performed on structures without superimposed load to limit inertial resistance. Subsequently, a follow-on series of tests was performed to investigate the response of axially-loaded CLT construction. Panels damaged during the preceding test were removed and replaced. Axial load was applied using precast concrete blocks to simulate the loaded condition of a five-story building at the first-floor front panel of the structures. These test structures were exposed to two shots: the first was designed to keep the structures within their respective elastic ranges while the second was designed to push the structures beyond their elastic limits. Reflected pressure and peak deflections were recorded at the front panels of the test structures to document the two-way panel load distribution behavior under a dynamic load event and the clearing of the shock wave. Prior to conducting the blast tests, a small number of tests were performed on a load tree test apparatus to aid in test planning by investigating the post-peak response of individual CLT panels of various lengths to quasi-static out-of-plane and axial loads applied simultaneously. This paper provides an overview of the results obtained from both the quasi-static and blast tests of axially-loaded CLT. Additionally, the paper compares CLT structure, component, and connection response across the suite of data. Conclusions are offered to assist engineers in the design of load bearing CLT construction exposed to airblast loads.
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Cross-Laminated Timber Shear Connections with Double-Angled Self-Tapping Screw Assemblies

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue544
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Hossain, Afrin
Danzig, Ilana
Tannert, Thomas
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Self-Tapping Screws
Shear Resistance Performance
Shear Connection
Quasi-Static
Reverse Cyclic Loading
Lateral Load
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Structural Engineering
Summary
The research presented in this paper examines the shear resistance performance of self-tapping screws (STS) in three-ply cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels. Specifically, the feasibility of using innovative STS assemblies with double inclination of fasteners was investigated for the shear connection of CLT panels. The specimens (1.5×1.5 m) were subjected to quasi-static and reversed-cyclic loading. The tests were set up to approximate pure shear loading, with three-panel CLT assemblies connected with STS. The resulting load-displacement and hysteretic curves were used to determine an equivalent energy elastic-plastic curve to estimate assembly capacity, yield load, yield displacement, ductility ratio, stiffness, and damping. Excellent structural performance in terms of capacity and stiffness was obtained while still providing the required ductility for the system to be used in seismic applications. The average static and cyclic yield loads were 6.0 kN/screw and 5.9 kN/screw, respectively. Average static and cyclic and ductility ratios were 7.7 and 4.1, respectively, allowing the connection to be classified as highly ductile under quasi-static loading and moderately ductile under reversed cyclic loading. The data obtained allow engineers to specify an innovative connection assembly with double inclination of fasteners for lateral load–resisting systems of CLT structures.
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Demonstration of a Cost-Effective CLT Panel Capable of Resisting DOS/DOD Design Basis Threats – Phase I

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2784
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Organization
Karagozian & Case
Country of Publication
United States
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Blast Tests
Blast Loading
Dynamic Loads
Quasi-Static Loading
Bond Integrity
Research Status
In Progress
Summary
Karagozian & Case (K&C), a science and engineering firm based in California, is seeking to develop and execute a two-phase testing program to demonstrate the blast-resistance capability of cross laminated timber (CLT). K&C’s proposal outlines a plan that will use full-size reinforced CLT panels to demonstrate that panels are capable of resisting severe blast, ballistic, and forced entry threats while still maintaining their bond line integrity under both quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. If the proposed effort is successful, blast testing on reinforced CLT panels will be pursued in a follow-on second phase.
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Ductile Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) Platform Structures with Passive Damping

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1728
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Hashemi, Ashkan
Loo, Wei Yuen
Masoudnia, Reza
Zarnani, Pouyan
Quenneville, Pierre
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Low-Rise
Numerical Model
Reverse Cyclic Loading
Quasi-Static
Simulation
Strength
Slip
Platform Buildings
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 4730-4737
Summary
Multi-storey platform cross laminated timber (CLT) structures are becoming progressively desirable for engineers and owners. This is because they offer many significant advantages such as speed of fabrication, ease of construction, and excellent strength to weight ratio. With platform construction, stories are fixed together in a way that...
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Experimental Investigation of Connection for the FFTT, A Timber-Steel Hybrid System

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue269
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Bhat, Pooja
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
FFTT
Quasi-Static
Monotonic Testing
Reverse Cyclic Testing
Embedment Depth
Embedment Length
Strong-column Weak-beam Failure
Cross-Section Reduction
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This thesis fills the existing knowledge gap between detailed design and global behaviour of hybrid systems through an experimental study on an innovative timber-steel hybrid system called “FFTT”. The FFTT system relies on wall panels of mass timber such as CLT for gravity and lateral load resistance and embedded steel sections for ductility under the earthquake loads. An important step towards the practical application of the FFTT system is obtaining the proof that the connections facilitate the desired ductile failure mode. The experimental investigation was carried out at the facility of FPInnovations, Vancouver. The testing program consisted of quasi-static monotonic and reverse cyclic tests on the timber-steel hybrid system with different configurations. The two beam profiles, wide flange I-sections and hollow rectangular sections were tested. The interaction between the steel beams and CLT panels and the effect of the embedment depth, cross-section reduction and embedment length were closely examined. The study demonstrated that when using an appropriate steel section, the desired ‘Strong Column–Weak Beam’ failure mechanism was initiated and excessive wood crushing was avoided. While wide-flange I-sections were stiffer and stronger, the hollow sections displayed better post-yield behaviour with higher energy dissipation capacity through several cycles of deformation under cyclic loads. The out-of-plane buckling at the point of yielding was the major setback of the embedment of wide-flange I-sections. This research served as a precursor for providing design guidance for the FFTT system as one option for tall wood buildings in high seismic regions.
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Experimental Study on Innovative Connections for Large Span Timber Truss Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue47
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Author
Yang, Huifeng
Crocetti, Roberto
Larsson, Gustaf
Gustafsson, Per-Johan
Publisher
International Association for Shell and Spatial Structures (IASS)
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Japan
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Reinforcement
Single Large Diameter Dowel Connection (SCDDC)
Full Scale
Tensile Tests
Quasi-Static
Steel Plates
Language
English
Conference
IASS WORKING GROUPS 12 + 18 International Colloquium 2015
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 10-13, 2015, Tokyo, Japan
Summary
This paper summarizes an experimental investigation on several innovative reinforcing techniques for the “Single Large Diameter Dowel Connection”, SLDDC in timber truss structures. Besides lateral reinforcing or prestressing, also steel plates glued on two sides of the glulam specimens were used as reinforcing measure. To study the efficiency of these techniques, 15 full-scale quasi-static tensile tests on glulam members with a SLDDC on either ends of each member were performed. It was found that the reinforcement significantly enhanced the bearing capacity of the SLDDCs. All of the reinforcing techniques showed a satisfactory efficiency, preventing splitting of wood. Moreover, most of the specimens remains showed a remarkable post failure strength.
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High-Capacity Hold-Down for Tall Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1529
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Wood Building Systems
Author
Zhang, Xiaoyue
Popovski, Marjan
Tannert, Thomas
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Holz-Stahl-Komposit
Hold-Down
Seismic Load
Strength
Stiffness
Ductility
Failure Mechanisms
Quasi-Static
Monotonic Loading
Reverse Cyclic Loading
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 725-732
Summary
The structural use of wood in North America is dominated by light wood-frame construction used in low-rise and – more recently – mid-rise residential buildings. Mass timber engineered wood products such as laminatedveneer-lumber and cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels enable to use the material in tall and large wood and woodbased hybrid buildings. The prospect of constructing taller buildings creates challenges, one of them being the increasein lateral forces created by winds and earthquakes, thus requiring stronger hold-down devices. This paper summarises the experimental investigation on the performance a high-capacity hold-down for resisting seismic loads in tall timberbased structural systems. The connection consists of the Holz-Stahl-Komposit-System (HSK)™ glued into CLT with the modification that ductile steel yielding was allowed to occur inside the CLT panel. The strength, stiffness, ductility and failure mechanisms of this connection were evaluated under quasi-static monotonic and reversed cyclic loading. The results demonstrate that the modified hold-down-assembly provides a possible solution for use in tall timber-based structures in high seismic zones
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High Performance Cross-Laminated-Timber Shear Connection with Self-Tapping Screw Assemblies

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue504
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Danzig, Ilana
Closen, Maximilian
Tannert, Thomas
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Self-Tapping Screws
Panels
Full Scale
Quasi-Static
Reverse Cyclic Loading
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
The research presented in this paper examines the performance of a shear connection using self-tapping screws (STS) in 3-ply Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) panels. CLT panels were connected with STS assemblies at an inclined angle in two directions. The capacity of the STS assemblies was tested for the purpose of designing a CLT roof diaphragm of a large storage facility where a high-performance and low-manufacturing-cost solution was required. A total of eleven full-scale specimens were subjected to quasi-static and reversed-cyclic shear loading. Resulting forcedisplacement and hysteretic curves were used to determine an equivalent energy elastic-plastic curve based on ASTM E2126-11 procedures to estimate assembly yield strength, yield displacement, and ductility ratio. The performance in terms of strength and stiffness was excellent, and the STS provided the required ductility for the system to be used in seismic applications. Static yield strength averaged 80kN/m with an average ductility ratio of 7.7 while cyclic yield strength averaged 68kN/m with an average ductility ratio of 4.1. The data obtained allows engineers to specify low-cost lateral load resisting connection systems for large scale CLT structures.
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Performance of Timber-Concrete Composite Floors Using Flat-Plate Engineered Wood Products

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1618
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Floors
Author
Gerber, Adam
Popovski, Marjan
Tannert, Thomas
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Strength
Stiffness
Small Scale
Shear Tests
Elastic Stiffness
Quasi-Static
Loading
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 2397-2406
Summary
Timber-Concrete Composite (TCC) systems are comprised of a timber element connected to a concrete slab through a mechanical shear connection. A large number of T-beam configurations currently exist; however, the growing availability of panel-type engineered wood products (EWPs) in North America in combination with a concrete topping has offered designers and engineers greater versatility in terms of architectural expression and structural and building physics performance. The focus of this investigation was to experimentally determine the properties for a range of TCC systems in several EWPs. Strength and stiffness properties were determined for different TCC configurations based on small-scale shear tests. Eighteen floor panels were tested for elastic stiffness under a quasi-static loading protocol and measurements of the dynamic properties were obtained prior to loading to failure. The tests confirmed that calculations according to the -method can predict the basic stiffness and dynamic properties of TCC floors within a reasonable degree of accuracy. Floor capacities were more difficult to predict, however, failure occurred at loads that were between four and ten times serviceability requirements. The research demonstrated that all selected connector configurations produced efficient timber-concrete-composite systems.
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16 records – page 1 of 2.