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6 records – page 1 of 1.

Adaptation of Advanced High R-Factor Bracing Systems into Heavy Timber Frames

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1760
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Author
Gilbert, Colin
Erochko, Jeffrey
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Quasi-Static
Cyclic Testing
Ductility
Damping Devices
R-factors
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 5068-5077
Summary
Timber provides attractive earthquake performance characteristics for regions of high seismic risk, particularly its high strength-to-weight ratio; however, current timber structural systems are associated with relatively low design force reduction factors due to their low inherent ductility when compared to high-performance concrete and steel...
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Experimental and Numerical Analyses of New Massive Wooden Shear-Wall Systems

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue93
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Pozza, Luca
Scotta, Roberto
Trutalli, Davide
Pinna, Mario
Polastri, Andrea
Bertoni, Paolo
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Switzerland
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Quasi-Static
Cyclic Loading Tests
Numerical model
Ductility
Eurocode 8
Behaviour Factor
Dissipative Capacity
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Buildings
ISSN
2075-5309
Summary
Three innovative massive wooden shear-wall systems (Cross-Laminated-Glued Wall, Cross-Laminated-Stapled Wall, Layered Wall with dovetail inserts) were tested and their structural behaviour under seismic action was assessed with numerical simulations. The wall specimens differ mainly in the method used to assemble the layers of timber boards composing them. Quasi-static cyclic loading tests were carried out and then reproduced with a non-linear numerical model calibrated on the test results to estimate the most appropriate behaviour factor for each system. Non-linear dynamic simulations of 15 artificially generated seismic shocks showed that these systems have good dissipative capacity when correctly designed and that they can be assigned to the medium ductility class of Eurocode 8. This work also shows the influence of deformations in wooden panels and base connectors on the behaviour factor and dissipative capacity of the system.
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High-Capacity Hold-Down for Tall Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1529
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Wood Building Systems
Author
Zhang, Xiaoyue
Popovski, Marjan
Tannert, Thomas
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Holz-Stahl-Komposit
Hold-Down
Seismic Load
Strength
Stiffness
Ductility
Failure Mechanisms
Quasi-Static
Monotonic Loading
Reverse Cyclic Loading
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 725-732
Summary
The structural use of wood in North America is dominated by light wood-frame construction used in low-rise and – more recently – mid-rise residential buildings. Mass timber engineered wood products such as laminatedveneer-lumber and cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels enable to use the material in tall and large wood and woodbased hybrid buildings. The prospect of constructing taller buildings creates challenges, one of them being the increasein lateral forces created by winds and earthquakes, thus requiring stronger hold-down devices. This paper summarises the experimental investigation on the performance a high-capacity hold-down for resisting seismic loads in tall timberbased structural systems. The connection consists of the Holz-Stahl-Komposit-System (HSK)™ glued into CLT with the modification that ductile steel yielding was allowed to occur inside the CLT panel. The strength, stiffness, ductility and failure mechanisms of this connection were evaluated under quasi-static monotonic and reversed cyclic loading. The results demonstrate that the modified hold-down-assembly provides a possible solution for use in tall timber-based structures in high seismic zones
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Shear Connections with Self-Tapping-Screws for Cross-Laminated-Timber Panels

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue432
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Hossain, Afrin
Lakshman, Ruthwik
Tannert, Thomas
Organization
Structures Congress
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Ductility
Self-Tapping Screws
Stiffness
Strength
Vertical Shear Loading
Mid-Scale
Quasi-Static
Shear Tests
Language
English
Conference
Structures Congress 2015
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 23–25, 2015, Portland, Oregon, USA
Summary
Cross-Laminated-Timber (CLT) is increasingly gaining popularity in residential and non-residential applications in North America. To use CLT as lateral load resisting system, individual panels need to be connected. In order to provide in-plane shear connections, CLT panels may be joined with a variety of options including the use of self-tapping-screws (STS) in surface splines and half-lap joints. Alternatively, STS can be installed at an angle to the plane allowing for simple butt joints and avoiding any machining. This study investigated the performance of CLT panel assemblies connected with STS under vertical shear loading. The three aforementioned options were applied to join 3ply and 5-ply CLT panels. A total of 60 mid-scale quasi-static shear tests were performed to determine and compare the connection performance in terms of strength, stiffness, and ductility. It was shown that – depending on the screw layout – either very stiff or very ductile joint performance can be achieved.
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Shear Connections with Self-Tapping-Screws for Cross-Laminated-Timber Panels

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1531
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Hossain, Afrin
Popovski, Marjan
Tannert, Thomas
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Self-Tapping Screws
Joints
Quasi-Static
Capacity
Stiffness
Yield Strength
Ductility
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 756-763
Summary
The research presented in this paper examines the performance of 3-ply and 5-ply Cross-laminated Timber (CLT) panels connected with Self-tapping Screws (STS). Different conventional joint types (surface spline with STS in shear and half-lap joints with STS in either shear or withdrawal) along with two innovative solutions were evaluated in a total of 198 quasi-static tests. The first novel assembly used STS with double inclination of fasteners in butt joints; the second was a combination of STS in withdrawal and shear in lap joints. The joint performance was evaluated in terms of capacity, stiffness, yield strength, and ductility. The results confirmed that joints with STS in shear exhibited high ductility but low stiffness, whereas joints with STS in withdrawal were found to be stiff but less ductile. Combining the shear and withdrawal action of STS led to high stiffness and high ductility.
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Simple Cross-Laminated Timber Shear Connections with Spatially Arranged Screws

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1716
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Loss, Cristiano
Hossain, Afrin
Tannert, Thomas
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
Netherlands
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Keywords
Self-Tapping Screws
Butt-Joint
Quasi-Static
Monotonic Loading
Reverse Cyclic Loading
Yield Load
Load Carrying Capacity
Slips
Elastic Stiffness
Ductility
Energy Dissipation
Strength
Angle
Model
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Engineering Structures
Summary
This paper presents an experimental study to evaluate the use of spatially arranged self-tapping screws (STS) as shear connections for cross-laminated timber panels. Specifically, simple butt joints combined with crossed STS with different inclinations were investigated under quasi-static monotonic and reversed-cyclic loadings. The influence of the number and angle of insertion of screws, screws characteristics, friction and loading on the joint performance was explored. The yield load, load-carrying capacity and related slips, elastic stiffness, and ductility were evaluated considering two groups of tests performed on a total of 63 specimens of different size. Performance of connections with respect to the energy dissipation and loss of strength under cyclic loads was also investigated. It was shown that the spatial insertion angle of screws plays a key role in the performance of joints, not only because it relates to the shank to grain angle, but also because it affects the amount of wood involved in the bearing mechanism. Design models of STS connections are presented and discussed, and the test results are compared against analytical predictions. While good agreement for load-carrying capacity was obtained, the existing stiffness model seems less adequate with a consistent overestimation.
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6 records – page 1 of 1.