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11 records – page 1 of 2.

Design and Testing of Post-Tensioned Timber Wall Systems

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue696
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Walls
Author
Sarti, Francesco
Palermo, Alessandro
Pampanin, Stefano
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Multi-Storey
Pres-Lam
Energy Dissipation
Quasi-Static Test
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
The paper presents the design and detailing, and the experimental quasi-static 2/3 scale tests of two posttensioned wall systems: a single (more traditional) wall system (Figure 2) and a new configuration comprising of a column-wall-column coupled system (Figure 3). The latter allows avoiding displacement incompatibilities issues between the wall and the diaphragm by using the boundary columns as supports.
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Lateral Load Resistance of Cross-Laminated Wood Panels

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2150
Year of Publication
2010
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls

Performance Based Design and Force Modification Factors for CLT Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue928
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Walls
Author
Pei, Shiling
Popovski, Marjan
van de Lindt, John
Year of Publication
2012
Country of Publication
Sweden
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Walls
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Quasi-Static Tests
R-factors
Performance-Based Seismic Design
US
Canada
Language
English
Conference
CIB-W18 Meeting
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 27-30, 2012, Växjö, Sweden p.293-304
Summary
In this paper, a performance-based seismic design (PBSD) of a CLT building was conducted and the seismic response of the CLT building was compared to that of a wood-frame structure tested during the NEESWood project. The results from the quasi-static tests on CLT walls performed at FPInnovations were used as input information for modelling of the CLT walls, the main lateral load resisting elements of the structure. Once the satisfactory design of the CLT mid-rise structure was established through PBSD, a force-based design was developed with varying R-factors and that design was compared to the PBSD result. In this way, suitable R-factors were calibrated so that they can yield equivalent seismic performance of the CLT building when designed using the traditional force-based design methods. Based on the results of this study it is recommended that a value of Rd=2.5 and Ro=1.5 can be assigned for structures with symmetrical floor plans in the National Building Code of Canada (NBCC). In the US an R=4.3 can be used for symmetrical CLT structures designed according to ASCE 7. These values can be assigned provided that the design values for CLT walls considered (and implemented in the material design standards) are similar to the values determined in this study using the kinematics model developed that includes the influence of the hold-downs in the CLT wall resistance. Design of the CLT building with those R-factors using the equivalent static procedures in the US and Canada will result in the CLT building having similar seismic performance to that of the tested wood-frame NEESWood building, which had only minor non-structural damage during a rare earthquake event.
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Quasi-Static Cyclic Testing of Two-Thirds Scale Unbonded Posttensioned Rocking Dissipative Timber Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue581
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Application
Walls
Author
Sarti, Francesco
Palermo, Alessandro
Pampanin, Stefano
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Journal Article
Application
Walls
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Keywords
Post-Tensioning
Dissipation
Quasi-Static
Cyclic Tests
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Structural Engineering
Summary
Previous tests carried out on post-tensioned timber walls focused on small scale (one-third) specimens with the main objective of evaluating the general response of the system. The main objective of the experimental program herein presented is the testing and estimating of the response of a series two-third scale post-tensioned walls, with alternative arrangements and combination of dissipaters and post-tensioning, focusing on the construction details adopted in real practice. The paper first presents a brief discussion on the seismic demand evaluation based on the Displacement-Based Design approach. The construction detailing of the steel dissipater connections, post-tensioning anchorage and shear keys are then presented. The main objectives of the experimental program were the investigation of the experimental behaviour of large scale post-tensioned timber walls, with particular focus on the system connection detailing and optimization of post-tensioning anchorage, fastening of the dissipation devices and shear keys. The program consisted of several quasi-static cyclic tests considering different steel dissipater configurations, different levels of post-tensioning initial stress and different dissipater options were considered: both internal and external mild steel tension-compression yield devices were used. The experimental results showed the performance of post-tensioned timber wall systems which provide high level of dissipation while showing negligible residual displacements and negligible damage to the wall element. The final part of the paper presents the experimental evaluation of the area-based hysteretic damping for the tested specimens and the results highlight the great influence of the connection detailing of the dissipaters.
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Quasi Static Cyclic Tests of 2/3 Scale Post-Tensioned Timber Wall and Column-Wall-Column (CWC) Systems

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue648
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Seismic
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Walls
Author
Sarti, Francesco
Palermo, Alessandro
Pampanin, Stefano
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
New Zealand
Format
Conference Paper
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Post-Tensioned
Quasi-Static Testing
Column-Wall-Column
Steel
U-Shaped Flexural Plates
Displacement
Language
English
Conference
New Zealand Society for Earthquake Engineering Conference
Research Status
Complete
Notes
March 21-23, 2014, Auckland, New Zealand
Summary
The paper presents the design and construction detailing of the quasi-static testing of two post-tensioned timber wall systems: a single (more traditional) wall system and a new configuration comprising of a column-wall-column coupled system (CWC). The latter allows avoiding displacement incompatibilities issues between the wall and the diaphragm by using the boundary columns as supports. Different reinforcement configurations were taken into account for both the wall systems; the walls were subjected to different initial post-tensioning stress levels, and different dissipater options were considered: both internal and external replaceable mild steel tension-compression yield fuses, and U-shape Flexural Plates (UFPs) were used for the single wall and the CWC solutions respectively. The experimental results showed the high-performance of both post-tensioned timber wall systems with negligible level of structural damage in the wall element and residual displacements and high level of dissipation.
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Free
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Response of Plywood-Coupled Post-Tensioned LVL Walls to Repeated Seismic Loading

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1583
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Walls
Author
Iqbal, Asif
Pampanin, Stefano
Fragiacomo, Massimo
Buchanan, Andrew
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Keywords
Post-Tensioned
Quasi-Static
Cyclic Testing
Energy Dissipation
Nails
Cyclic Loading
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 1807-1813
Summary
Laminated veneer lumber (LVL) structural members have recently been proposed for multi-storey timber buildings based on ongoing research at University of Canterbury, New Zealand. The members are designed with unbonded post-tensioning for recentering and energy dissipation through the ductile connections. This paper describes the experimental and numerical investigation of post-tensioned LVL walls coupled with plywood sheets, under quasistatic cyclic testing protocols. It is observed that energy is dissipated mostly through yielding of the nails, and the LVL walls return close to their initial position while remaining virtually undamaged. The same specimen has been tested under repeated cyclic loading to investigate the performance of the arrangement under more than one seismic event (a major earthquake followed by a significant aftershock). Different nail spacing and arrangements have been tested to compare their energy dissipation characteristics. The results indicate good seismic performance, characterized by negligible damage of the structural members and very small residual deformations. The only component significantly damaged is the nailed connection between the plywood sheet and the LVL walls. Although the nails yield and there is a reduction in stiffness the system exhibits a stable performance without any major degradation throughout the loading regime. The plywood can be easily removed and replaced with new sheets after an earthquake, which are reasonably cheap and easy to install, allowing for major reduction in downtime. With these additional benefits the concept has potential for consideration as an alternative solution for multi-storey timber buildings.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Seismic Behaviour of Cross-Laminated Timber Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2151
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls

Seismic Design and Testing of Rocking Cross Laminated Timber Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue202
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Author
Ganey, Ryan
Organization
University of Washington
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Diaphragms
Post-Tensioned
U-Shaped Flexural Plates
Energy Dissipation
Quasi-Static
Reverse Cyclic Load
Tall Wood
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Seismically resilient, lateral systems for tall timber buildings can be created by combining cross laminated timber (CLT) panels with post-tensioned (PT) self-centering technology. The concept features a system of stacked CLT walls where particular stories are equipped to rock against the above and below floor diaphragms through PT connections and are supplemented with mild steel U-shaped flexural plate energy dissipation devices (UFPs). Experiments were conducted to better understand rocking CLT wall behavior and seismic performance. The testing program consisted of five single wall tests with varying PT areas, initial tensioning force, CLT panel composition, and rocking surface and one coupled wall test with UFPs as the coupling devices. The walls were tested with a quasi-static reverse-cyclic load protocol. The experimental results showed a ductile response and good energy dissipation qualities. To evaluate the feasibility and performance of the rocking CLT wall system, prototype designs were developed for 8 to 14 story buildings in Seattle using a performance-based seismic design procedure. Performance was assessed using numerical simulations performed in OpenSees for ground motions representing a range of seismic hazards. The results were used to validate the performance-based seismic design procedure for tall timber buildings with rocking CLT walls.
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Free
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Seismic Performance of a Post-Tensioned LVL Building Subjected to the Canterbury Earthquake Sequence

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue157
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Seismic
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Frames
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Author
Smith, Tobias
Carradine, David
Pampanin, Stefano
Ditommaso, Rocco
Carlo Ponzo, Felice
Year of Publication
2012
Country of Publication
New Zealand
Format
Conference Paper
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Frames
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Post-Tensioning
Quasi-Static
Dynamic
Language
English
Conference
New Zealand Society for Earthquake Engineering Conference
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 13-15, 2012, Christchurch, New Zealand
Summary
The following paper presents the seismic performance of a two storey post-tensioned Laminated Veneer Lumber (LVL) building during the aftershock sequence following the MW 6.3 Canterbury earthquake that occurred on 22nd February 2011. Composed of post-tensioned walls in one direction and post-tensioned frames in the other, the structure under analysis was originally tested quasi-statically in the structural laboratories of the University of Canterbury (UoC), Christchurch, New Zealand. Following testing the building was demounted and reassembled as the offices of the STIC (Structural Timber Innovation Company) research consortium on the UoC campus with several significant changes being made to convert the building from its initial use as a test specimen into a functioning office structure.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Seismic Performance of Core-Walls for Multi-Storey Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue61
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Dunbar, Andrew
Pampanin, Stefano
Buchanan, Andrew
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
New Zealand
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Connections
Multi-Storey
Post-Tensioned
Quasi-Static
Half-Scale
Language
English
Conference
New Zealand Society for Earthquake Engineering Conference
Research Status
Complete
Notes
March 21-23, 2014, Auckland, New Zealand
Summary
This paper describes the results of experimental tests on two posttensioned timber core-walls tested under bi-directional quasi-static seismic loading. The half-scale two-storey test specimens included a stair with half-flight landings. The use of Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) panels for multi-storey timber buildings is gaining popularity throughout the world, especially for residential construction. Posttensioned timber core-walls for lift-shafts or stairwells can be used for seismic resistance in open-plan commercial office buildings Previous experimental testing has been done on the in-plane behaviour of single and coupled timber walls at the University of Canterbury and elsewhere. However, there has been very little research done on the 3D behaviour of timber walls that are orthogonal to each other, and no research to date into post-tensioned CLT walls. The “high seismic option” consisted of full height post-tensioned CLT walls coupled with energy dissipating U-shaped Flexural Plates (UFPs) attached at the vertical joints between coupled wall panels and between wall panels and the steel corner columns. An alternative “low seismic option” consisted of post-tensioned CLT panels connected by screws, to provide a semi-rigid connection, allowing relative movement between the panels, producing some level of frictional energy dissipation.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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11 records – page 1 of 2.