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36 records – page 1 of 4.

Blast Testing of Loaded Cross-Laminated Timber Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1234
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Weaver, Mark
Newberry, Charles
Podesto, Lisa
O’Laughlin, Casey
Organization
Structures Congress
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Keywords
Blast Tests
Airblast Loads
Axial Load
Panels
Load Distribution
Quasi-Static
Language
English
Conference
Structures Conference 2018
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 19–21, 2018, Fort Worth, Texas
Summary
Results from a series of blast tests performed in October 2016 on three two-story, single-bay cross-laminated timber (CLT) structures demonstrated the ability of CLT construction to resist airblast loads in a predictable fashion. These tests were performed on structures without superimposed load to limit inertial resistance. Subsequently, a follow-on series of tests was performed to investigate the response of axially-loaded CLT construction. Panels damaged during the preceding test were removed and replaced. Axial load was applied using precast concrete blocks to simulate the loaded condition of a five-story building at the first-floor front panel of the structures. These test structures were exposed to two shots: the first was designed to keep the structures within their respective elastic ranges while the second was designed to push the structures beyond their elastic limits. Reflected pressure and peak deflections were recorded at the front panels of the test structures to document the two-way panel load distribution behavior under a dynamic load event and the clearing of the shock wave. Prior to conducting the blast tests, a small number of tests were performed on a load tree test apparatus to aid in test planning by investigating the post-peak response of individual CLT panels of various lengths to quasi-static out-of-plane and axial loads applied simultaneously. This paper provides an overview of the results obtained from both the quasi-static and blast tests of axially-loaded CLT. Additionally, the paper compares CLT structure, component, and connection response across the suite of data. Conclusions are offered to assist engineers in the design of load bearing CLT construction exposed to airblast loads.
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Systematic Experimental Investigation to Support the Development of Seismic Performance Factors for Cross Laminated Timber Shear Wall Systems

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1281
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Amini, Omar
van de Lindt, John
Rammer, Douglas
Pei, Shiling
Line, Philip
Popovski, Marjan
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
Netherlands
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Quasi-Static
Cyclic Tests
Stiffness
Strength
Deformation
Aspect Ratios
Thickness
Joints
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Engineering Structures
Summary
In the US, codified seismic design procedure requires the use of seismic performance factors which are currently not available for CLT shear wall systems. The study presented herein focuses on the determination of seismic design factors for CLT shear walls in platform type construction using the FEMA P-695 process. Results from the study will be proposed for implementation in the seismic design codes in the US. The project approach is outlined and selected results of full-scale shear wall testing are presented and discussed. Archetype development, which is required as part of the FEMA P-695 process, is briefly explained with an example. Quasi-static cyclic tests were conducted on CLT shear walls to systematically investigate the effects of various parameters. The key aspect of these tests is that they systematically investigate each potential modelling attribute that is judged within the FEMA P-695 uncertainty quantification process. Boundary constraints and gravity loading were both found to have a beneficial effect on the wall performance, i.e. higher strength and deformation capacity. Higher aspect ratio panels (4:1) demonstrated lower stiffness and substantially larger deformation capacity compared to moderate aspect ratio panels (2:1). However, based on the test results there is likely a lower bound for aspect ratio (at 2:1) where it ceases to benefit deformation capacity of the wall. This is due to the transition of the wall behaviour from rocking to sliding. Phenomenological models were used in modelling CLT shear walls. Archetype selection and analysis procedure was demonstrated and nonlinear time history analysis was conducted using different wall configurations.
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Simple Cross-Laminated Timber Shear Connections with Spatially Arranged Screws

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1716
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)

Structural Performance of Nail-Laminated Timber-Concrete Composite Floors

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2146
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Connections
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Hong, Kwan Eui Marcel
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Connections
Keywords
Truss Plates
Self-Tapping Screws
Strength
Stiffness
Shear Connectors
Quasi-Static Loading Test
Bending
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Nail-laminated timber-concrete composite (TCC) is a system composed of a nail-laminated timber (NLT) panel connected to a concrete slab through shear connections. When used as flexural elements such as floors, the concrete and NLT are located in the compression and tension zones, respectively...
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Seismic Performance of Embedded Steel Beam Connection in Cross-Laminated Timber Panels for Tall-Wood Hybrid System

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue415
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Zhang, Xiaoyue
Azim, Riasat
Bhat, Pooja
Popovski, Marjan
Tannert, Thomas
Publisher
Canadian Science Publishing
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Timber-Steel Hybrid
Energy Dissipation
FFTT
Quasi-Static
Monotonic Test
Reverse Cyclic Test
Failure mechanism
Beam Profiles
Embedment
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Canadian Journal of Civil Engineering
Summary
Recent developments in novel engineered mass timber products and connection systems have created the possibility to design and construct tall timber-based buildings. This research presents the experiments conducted on the steel-wood connection as main energy dissipating part of a novel steel–timber hybrid system labelled Finding the Forest Through the Trees (FFTT). The performance was investigated using quasi-static monotonic and reversed cyclic tests. The influence of different steel beam profiles (wide flange I-sections and hollow rectangular sections), and the embedment approaches (partial and full embedment) was investigated. The test results demonstrated that appropriate connection layouts can lead to the desired failure mechanism while avoiding excessive crushing of the mass timber panels. The research can serve as a precursos for developing design guidelines for the FFTT systems as an option for tall wood-hybrid building systems in seismic regions.
Copyright
Courtesy of Canadian Science Publishing
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Adaptation of Advanced High R-Factor Bracing Systems into Heavy Timber Frames

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1760
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Author
Gilbert, Colin
Erochko, Jeffrey
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Quasi-Static
Cyclic Testing
Ductility
Damping Devices
R-factors
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 5068-5077
Summary
Timber provides attractive earthquake performance characteristics for regions of high seismic risk, particularly its high strength-to-weight ratio; however, current timber structural systems are associated with relatively low design force reduction factors due to their low inherent ductility when compared to high-performance concrete and steel...
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Determination of Seismic Performance Factors for CLT Shear Wall Systems

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue770
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Amini, M. Omar
van de Lindt, John
Rammer, Douglas
Pei, Shiling
Line, Philip
Popovski, Marjan
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Keywords
Angle Bracket
Cyclic Tests
US
Quasi-Static
Seismic Performance Factors
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria
Summary
This paper presents selected results of connector testing and wall testing which were part of a Forest Products Lab-funded project undertaken at Colorado State University in an effort to determine seismic performance factors for cross laminated timber (CLT) shear walls in the United States. Archetype development, which is required as part of the process, is also discussed. Connector tests were performed on generic angle brackets which were tested under shear and uplift and performed as expected with consistent nail withdrawal observed. Quasi-static cyclic tests were conducted on CLT shear walls to systematically investigate the effects of various parameters. Boundary constraints and gravity loading were both found to have a beneficial effect on the wall performance, i.e. higher strength and deformation capacity. Specific gravity also had a significant effect on wall behaviour while CLT thickness was less influential. Higher aspect ratio panels (4:1) demonstrated lower stiffness and substantially larger deformation capacity compared to moderate aspect ratio panels (2:1). However, based on the test results there is likely a lower bound of 2:1 for aspect ratio where it ceases to have any beneficial effect on wall behaviour. This is likely due to the transition from the dominant rocking behaviour to sliding behaviour.
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Shear Connections with Self-Tapping-Screws for Cross-Laminated-Timber Panels

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1531
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Hossain, Afrin
Popovski, Marjan
Tannert, Thomas
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Self-Tapping Screws
Joints
Quasi-Static
Capacity
Stiffness
Yield Strength
Ductility
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 756-763
Summary
The research presented in this paper examines the performance of 3-ply and 5-ply Cross-laminated Timber (CLT) panels connected with Self-tapping Screws (STS). Different conventional joint types (surface spline with STS in shear and half-lap joints with STS in either shear or withdrawal) along with two innovative solutions were evaluated in a total of 198 quasi-static tests. The first novel assembly used STS with double inclination of fasteners in butt joints; the second was a combination of STS in withdrawal and shear in lap joints. The joint performance was evaluated in terms of capacity, stiffness, yield strength, and ductility. The results confirmed that joints with STS in shear exhibited high ductility but low stiffness, whereas joints with STS in withdrawal were found to be stiff but less ductile. Combining the shear and withdrawal action of STS led to high stiffness and high ductility.
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Response of Plywood-Coupled Post-Tensioned LVL Walls to Repeated Seismic Loading

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1583
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Walls
Author
Iqbal, Asif
Pampanin, Stefano
Fragiacomo, Massimo
Buchanan, Andrew
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Keywords
Post-Tensioned
Quasi-Static
Cyclic Testing
Energy Dissipation
Nails
Cyclic Loading
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 1807-1813
Summary
Laminated veneer lumber (LVL) structural members have recently been proposed for multi-storey timber buildings based on ongoing research at University of Canterbury, New Zealand. The members are designed with unbonded post-tensioning for recentering and energy dissipation through the ductile connections. This paper describes the experimental and numerical investigation of post-tensioned LVL walls coupled with plywood sheets, under quasistatic cyclic testing protocols. It is observed that energy is dissipated mostly through yielding of the nails, and the LVL walls return close to their initial position while remaining virtually undamaged. The same specimen has been tested under repeated cyclic loading to investigate the performance of the arrangement under more than one seismic event (a major earthquake followed by a significant aftershock). Different nail spacing and arrangements have been tested to compare their energy dissipation characteristics. The results indicate good seismic performance, characterized by negligible damage of the structural members and very small residual deformations. The only component significantly damaged is the nailed connection between the plywood sheet and the LVL walls. Although the nails yield and there is a reduction in stiffness the system exhibits a stable performance without any major degradation throughout the loading regime. The plywood can be easily removed and replaced with new sheets after an earthquake, which are reasonably cheap and easy to install, allowing for major reduction in downtime. With these additional benefits the concept has potential for consideration as an alternative solution for multi-storey timber buildings.
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Performance of Timber-Concrete Composite Floors Using Flat-Plate Engineered Wood Products

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1618
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Floors
Author
Gerber, Adam
Popovski, Marjan
Tannert, Thomas
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Strength
Stiffness
Small Scale
Shear Tests
Elastic Stiffness
Quasi-Static
Loading
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 2397-2406
Summary
Timber-Concrete Composite (TCC) systems are comprised of a timber element connected to a concrete slab through a mechanical shear connection. A large number of T-beam configurations currently exist; however, the growing availability of panel-type engineered wood products (EWPs) in North America in combination with a concrete topping has offered designers and engineers greater versatility in terms of architectural expression and structural and building physics performance. The focus of this investigation was to experimentally determine the properties for a range of TCC systems in several EWPs. Strength and stiffness properties were determined for different TCC configurations based on small-scale shear tests. Eighteen floor panels were tested for elastic stiffness under a quasi-static loading protocol and measurements of the dynamic properties were obtained prior to loading to failure. The tests confirmed that calculations according to the -method can predict the basic stiffness and dynamic properties of TCC floors within a reasonable degree of accuracy. Floor capacities were more difficult to predict, however, failure occurred at loads that were between four and ten times serviceability requirements. The research demonstrated that all selected connector configurations produced efficient timber-concrete-composite systems.
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36 records – page 1 of 4.