Skip header and navigation

5 records – page 1 of 1.

Bond Behavior between Glulam and GFRP’s by Pullout Tests

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue560
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Author
Sena-Cruz, José
Branco, Jorge
Jorge, Marco
Barros, Joaquim
Silva, Catarina
Cunha, Vitor
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2011
Country of Publication
Netherlands
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Keywords
GFRP
Bond behavior
Pull-Out Tests
Stress-Slip
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Composites Part B: Engineering
Summary
To evaluate the bond behavior between glulam and GFRP rods, applied according to the nearsurface mounted strengthening technique, an experimental program composed of beam and direct pullout tests was carried. In this experimental program three main variables were analyzed: the GFRP type, the GFRP location into the groove, and the bond length. From the monitoring system it was registered the loaded and free end slips, and the pullout force. Based on these experimental results, and applying an analytical-numerical strategy, the local bond stress-slip relationship was calculated. In this work the tests are described, the obtained results are presented and discussed, and the applicability of the inverse analysis to obtain the local bond law is demonstrated.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Bond Between Glulam and NSM CFRP Laminates

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue331
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Author
Sena-Cruz, José
Jorge, Marco
Branco, Jorge
Cunha, Vitor
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
Netherlands
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer
Pull-Out Tests
Bond behavior
Stress-Slip
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Construction and Building Materials
Summary
With the aim of evaluating the bond behaviour between glulam and carbon fibre reinforced polymer laminates strips, an experimental program using pull-out tests was carried, when the near-surface strengthening technique is applied. Two main variables were studied: the bond length and the type of pull-out test configuration. The instrumentation included the loaded and free-end slips, as well as the pullout force. Based on the obtained experimental results, and applying an analytical-numerical strategy, the local bond stress-slip relationship was determined. In this work the tests are described, the obtained results are presented and analysed, and the applicability of an inverse analysis to obtain the local bond law is demonstrated.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Development of Continuous Composite Joints on the Basis of Polymer Mortar with Matched Properties

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue688
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Beams
Author
Kaestner, Martin
Jahreis, Markus
Hädicke, Wolfram
Rautenstrauch, Karl
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Beams
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Keywords
High-Tech Timber Beam
polymer concrete
Pull-Out Tests
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
For demanding applications with increased requirements in terms of load-carrying capacity and long spans, the HighTech Timber Beam® (HTB) – a hybrid composite beam made of glulam and high-performance materials – was developed at the Bauhaus University in cooperation with a local SME [1]. The applicability of the High-Tech Timber Beam® for TCC constructions (Timber-ConcreteComposite) is examined in ongoing research. In former investigations several studies with new technologies and materials for rehabilitation and strengthening of historic timber structures were carried out at the Bauhaus University [3]. Within those studies, several formulations of glue-mortar based on epoxy resin and mineral fillings (hereinafter also referred to as PC – polymer concrete) were developed to implement a direct and continuous bond between timber and reinforcing materials or elements (for instance LVL, CFRP lamellas, bars made of GFRP or steel). The different mixtures of PC were adjusted to their application purposes through a range of modifications to the composition and detailed material analysis.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Fire-Resistance of Timber-Concrete Composite Floor Using Laminated Veneer Lumber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue255
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Fire
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Ranger, Lindsay
Dagenais, Christian
Cuerrier-Auclair, Samuel
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Connections
Fire
Keywords
High-Rise
Structural Behaviour
Pull-Out Tests
shear connectors
Fire Resistance
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
There is a need to demonstrate how novel timber-concrete composite floors can span long distances and be a practical alternative to other traditional structural systems. Better understanding of the fire behaviour of these hybrid systems is essential. To achieve this, the fire-resistance of a timber-concrete composite floor assembly, using BC wood products, will be evaluated in accordance with CAN/ULC-S101 [2]. A 2 hr fire resistance rating will be targeted, as this is the current requirement in high-rise buildings for floor separations between occupancies. The structural behaviour of this type of system will also be assessed from conducting pull-out tests of the shear connectors. In conjunction with previous test data, the results of this test will be used to develop an analytical model to assess the structural and fire-resistance of timber-concrete composite floors.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Pull-Out Strength of Glued-In Rod Joints from LVL

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue686
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Author
Ito, Kazutoshi
Lee, Wonwoo
Song, Changsuk
Tanaka, Kei
Koshihara, Mikio
Inoue, Masafumi
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Pull-Out Tests
Glued-in rod joint
Strength
Temporary Loading
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
Recently, the Japanese government enacted a new law in order to promote large wooden building. As a result, the momentum in the construction of large wooden building especially multi-stories wooden buildings in local area has been growing rapidly. In order to achieve these buildings, the higher structural performances than that by usual technique are required.GIR joint system is widely adapted for the joint part of wooden structures. Glued in rod joint-system(GIR) have high strength and high rigidity compared to existing joint-system. On the other hand, the structural LVL with the flexibility performance of cross-section and high structural performance is expected as a material for multi-stories wooden building. So, in this study, the pull-out tests of GIR joints inserted to structural LVL are carried out. And structural characteristics of this type of joint is discussed. Maximum strength and allowable load for temporary loading obtained by pull-out tests are presented.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail