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Design Options for Three- and Four-Storey Wood School Buildings in British Columbia

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2373
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Other Materials
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Bevilacqua, Nick
Dickof, Carla
Wolfe, Ray
Gan, Wei-Jie
Embury-Williams, Lynn
Organization
Fast + Epp
Wood Works! BC
Thinkspace
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Other Materials
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Construction
Education
School Buildings
Mass Timber
Multi-Storey
Building Code
Fire Protection
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This study illustrates the range of possible wood construction approaches for school buildings that are up to four storeys in height. As land values continue to rise, particularly in higher-density urban environments, schools with smaller footprints will become increasingly more necessary to satisfy enrollment demands. There are currently a number of planned new school projects throughout British Columbia that anticipate requiring either three-or four-storey buildings, and it is forecasted that the demand for school buildings of this size will continue to rise. This study is closely related to the report Risk Analysis and Alternative Solution for Three- and Four-Storey Schools of Mass Timber and/or Wood-Frame Construction prepared by GHL Consultants, which explores the building code related considerations of wood construction for school buildings that are up to four storeys in height. Though wood construction offers a viable structural material option for these buildings, the British Columbia Building Code (BCBC 2018) currently limits schools comprised of wood construction to a maximum of two storeys, while also imposing limits on the overall floor area. As such, the reader is referred to the GHL report for further information regarding building code compliance (with a particular emphasis on fire protection) for wood school buildings.
Online Access
Free
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Joint Professional Practice Guidelines: Encapsulated Mass Timber Construction up to 12 Storeys

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2772
Edition
Version 1.0 March 30, 2021
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Organization
Architectural Institute of British Columbia (AIBC)
Engineers and Geoscientists British Columbia
Edition
Version 1.0 March 30, 2021
Year of Publication
2021
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Book/Guide
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Acoustics
Structural
Design
Building Enclosure
Architecture
Quality Assurance
Building Code
Encapsulated Mass Timber Construction
Engineering
Fire Protection
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
These Joint Professional Practice Guidelines – Encapsulated Mass Timber Construction Up to 12 Storeys were jointly prepared by the Architectural Institute of British Columbia (AIBC) and Engineers and Geoscientists British Columbia. The AIBC and Engineers and Geoscientists BC regulate and govern the professions of architecture, engineering, and geoscience under the Architects Act and the Professional Governance Act. The AIBC and Engineers and Geoscientists BC each have a regulatory mandate to protect the public interest, which is met in part by setting and maintaining appropriate academic, experience, and professional practice standards. Engineering Professionals are required per Section 7.3.1 of the Bylaws - Professional Governance Act to have regard for applicable standards, policies, plans, and practices established by the government or by Engineers and Geoscientists BC, including professional practice guidelines. For Engineering Professionals, these professional practice guidelines clarify the expectations for professional practice, conduct, and competence when providing engineering services for EMTC buildings. For Architects, these guidelines provide important information and identify issues to be considered when providing architectural services for EMTC buildings. These guidelines deal with the performance of specific activities in a manner such that Architects and Engineering Professionals can meet their professional obligations under the Architects Act and the Professional Governance Act. These guidelines were developed in response to new classifications of building size and construction relative to occupancy introduced in the 2018 British Columbia Building Code (BCBC), under Division B, Article 3.2.2.48EMTC. Group C, up to 12 storeys, Sprinklered, and Article 3.2.2.57EMTC. Group D, up to 12 storeys, Sprinklered. These new classifications were introduced in Revision 2 of the 2018 BCBC on December 12, 2019 and in Amendment 12715 of the 2019 Vancouver Building By-law (VBBL) on July 1, 2020. Additionally, provisions related to Encapsulated Mass Timber Construction (EMTC) were introduced in Revision 1 of the 2018 British Columbia Fire Code (BCFC) on December 12, 2019. These guidelines were first published in 2021 to provide guidance on architectural and engineering considerations relating to these significant changes to the 2018 BCBC, the 2019 VBBL, and the 2018 BCFC. For Engineering Professionals, these guidelines are intended to clarify the expectations of professional practice, conduct, and competence when Engineering Professionals are engaged on an EMTC building. For Architects, these guidelines inform and support relevant competency standards of practice to be met when Architects are engaged on an EMTC building. As with all building and construction types, the EMTC-specific code provisions prescribe minimum requirements that must be met. The majority of EMTC of 7 to 12 storeys are considered High Buildings, and as such are subject to the BCBC, Subsection 3.2.6. Additional Requirements for High Buildings.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Mass Timber Buildings and the IBC

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2614
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Organization
American Wood Council
International Code Council
Publisher
ICC
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Building Code
Mass Timber
Structural
Fire Protection
Construction
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
ISBN
978-1-952468-02-5
Summary
Developed by ICC and American Wood Council, this first edition provides an overview of requirements for mass timber construction as found in the 2021 International Building Code® (IBC®). The document reviews the 2015 IBC’s recognition of cross-laminated timber (CLT), the reorganization of heavy timber provisions in the 2018 IBC, followed by the historic changes in the 2021 IBC and International Fire Code® (IFC®) for tall mass timber construction. The 2021 IBC and IFC include important changes in material technologies and their expanded use as proposed by the ICC Ad Hoc Committee on Tall Wood Buildings. Three new types of construction (Types IV-A, IV-B and IV-C) defined and included in the 2021 codes allow the use of mass timber for buildings of taller heights, more stories above grade, and greater allowable areas compared to existing provisions for heavy timber buildings. Features: More than 100 full-color photos, illustrations and tables enhance comprehension and help users visualize requirements Content accurately reflects mass timber provisions in the 2015, 2018 and 2021 IBC, and 2021 IFC “Change Significance” topics reinforce the content and offer helpful background regarding code provisions Results are provided for five fire tests in a fully furnished structure constructed to simulate Types IV-A, IV-B and IV-C Detailed examples facilitate comprehension of code application and methods of determining code compliance Application of energy, sound transmission, structural loads, and other code provisions to mass timber construction 50 practice questions to help users prepare for ICC certification exams This is an incredibly valuable and time-saving reference for architects, engineers, building/fire officials and inspectors.
Online Access
Payment Required
Resource Link
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