Skip header and navigation

8 records – page 1 of 1.

Design of a "Mass-Timber" Building with Different Seismic Bracing Technologies

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1900
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Frames
Author
Fini, Giulio
Pozza, Luca
Loss, Cristiano
Tannert, Thomas
Publisher
ANIDIS Earthquake Engineering in Italy
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Italy
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Frames
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Timber Frames
Prefabrication
Seismic Performance
Language
English
Conference
17th ANIDIS Conference
Research Status
Complete
Notes
September 17-21, 2017, Pistoia, Italy
ISBN
978-886741-8541
ISSN
2532-120X
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Enabling Prefabricated Timber Building Systems in Commercial Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1927
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Market and Adoption
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Bylund, David
Organization
Centre for Sustainable Architecture in Wood
Publisher
Forest & Wood Products Australia
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Australia
Format
Report
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Market and Adoption
Keywords
Prefabrication
Commercial
NCC
Mid-Rise
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
ISBN
978-1-925213-58-4
Summary
This project identifies drivers for, and barriers to, the increased use of prefabricated timber building (PTB) systems in Class 2 to 9 commercial buildings, such as apartments, hotels, office buildings and schools. PTB systems in Australia are in a formative stage and yet to achieve broad acceptance in the marketplace as a conventional method of building. Opportunities for PTB systems can use timber’s well-established benefits such as high strength-to-weight ratio; design and construction flexibility; general environmental credentials including carbon sequestration; and prefabrication’s suitability for use on brown-field, restricted access and difficult sites and developments. In addition legislative constraints have now been largely removed (e.g. through changes to the 2016 National Construction Code). An increase in large scale mid-rise prefabricated buildings, and with the increasing nationalisation and internationalisation of the top tier building companies, suggests market acceptance will grow as PTB buildings are seen as ‘normal’.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Environmental Performances of a Timber-Concrete Prefabricated Composite Wall System

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1343
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Walls
Author
Fortuna, Stefano
Dalla Mora, Tiziano
Peron, Fabio
Romagnoni, Piercarlo
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Netherlands
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Walls
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Concrete Glulam Framed Panel
Embodied Energy
Carbon Footprint
Cradle-to-Gate
Prefabrication
Reinforced Concrete
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Energy Procedia
Summary
The improvement of environmental performance in building construction could be achieved by prefabrication. This study quantifies and compares the environmental impacts of a Concrete Glulam Framed Panel (CGFP): the basic configuration of this precast component consists in a Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) frame structure supporting a thin reinforced concrete slab with an interior insulation panel and covered by finishing layers. The research investigates also alternative design of configuration with the substitution of different insulation materials in order to minimize the Embodied Energy and Carbon Footprint values. The boundary of the quantitative analysis is “cradle to gate” including the structural support system; an IMPACT 2002+ characterization methodology is employed to translate inventory flows into impacts indicators. Results present very low values for carbon footprint (60.63 kg CO2eq m-2) and the embodied energy values (919.44 MJ m-2) indicate this hybrid precast structure as a valid alternative building constructions and processes. A detailed discussion of the outputs is presented, including the comparison of the environmental performances depending on different insulation materials.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Innovation in Hybrid Mass Timber High-Rise Construction: A Case Study of UBC’s Brock Commons Project

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1273
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
General Information
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Fallahi, Azadeh
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
General Information
Keywords
High-Rise
Construction
Design
Prefabrication
Project Coordination
Virtual Design and Construction
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
With the advocacy for sustainable construction on the rise, use of timber as the main building material is being championed in large-scale construction projects. While the advancement of engineered timber products is addressing some issues that previously limited the use of wood in high-rise construction, there are still challenges such as fire and weather safety, code compliance and negative public perceptions. One main gap in the available resources is the lack of a comprehensive and detailed case study of a high-rise project with wood as the main construction material to capture constraints and innovations necessary in creating success, which has formed the direction of this research. This thesis is focused on documenting a case study of the Brock Commons project, an 18 storey, hybrid timber-concrete residential high-rise located at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver campus, which is the tallest hybrid timber building in the world. The overall research objective was to identify and document the delivery of this innovative project, with a specific emphasis on the innovations necessary to make timber high-rise construction successful and the use of VDC tools in the design and pre-construction process. The case study documents the project context, the design process, the business and industry drivers, and the motivation for construction. Moreover, it investigates the motivations for all stakeholders, identifies the challenges and constraints, and captures the innovative solutions that were utilized to ensure project success. The case study also documents the innovative use of VDC to support prefabrication and overall project coordination. Specifically, it investigates the role of the VDC integrators in the project, the paths of communications with the different project team members, and the inputs and outputs of each phase of design and construction. This research identified lessons learned that can be applied to other construction projects where timber is the main structural component and a heavy use of VDC and pre-fabrication is required. Use of timber and innovative methods in construction have been consistently rising in the past decade, and this research aims to provide a starting point for future efforts in mass timber high-rise construction.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Innovative Composite Steel-Timber Floors with Prefabricated Modular Components

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1350
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Steel-Timber Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Loss, Cristiano
Davison, Buick
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Netherlands
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Steel-Timber Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Prefabricated
Multi-Storey
Residential
Bearing Capacity
Stiffness
Construction
Mechanical Connectors
Epoxy
Modular
Bending Tests
Finite Element Model
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Engineering Structures
Summary
An innovative steel-timber composite floor for use in multi-storey residential buildings is presented. The research demonstrates the potential of these steel-timber composite systems in terms of bearing capacity, stiffness and method of construction. Such engineered solutions should prove to be sustainable since they combine recyclable materials in the most effective way. The floors consist of prefabricated ultralight modular components, with a Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) slab, joined together and to the main structural system using only bolts and screws. Two novel floor solutions are presented, along with the results of experimental tests on the flexural behaviour of their modular components. Bending tests have been performed considering two different methods of loading and constraints. Each prefabricated modular component uses a special arrangement of steel-timber connections to join a CLT panel to two customized cold-formed steel beams. Specifically, the first proposed composite system is assembled using mechanical connectors whereas the second involves the use of epoxy-based resin. In the paper, a FEM model is provided in order to extend this study to other steel-timber composite floor solutions. In addition, the paper contains the design model to be used in dimensioning the developed systems according to the state of the art of composite structures.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Ontario Wood Bridge Reference Guide

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2132
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Bridges and Spans

Tall Wood Building Enclosures – A Race To the Top

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2346
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Design and Systems
Site Construction Management
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Building Envelope
Author
Hubbs, Brian
Finch, Graham
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Building Envelope
Topic
Design and Systems
Site Construction Management
Keywords
Prefabrication
Building Enclosure
Façade
Curtain Wall
Durability
Construction Time
Language
English
Conference
Canadian Conference on Building Science and Technology
Research Status
Complete
Summary
On tall wood buildings, mass timber elements including CLT, NLT, glulam, and other engineered components absolutely need to be protected from excessive wetting during construction. This requirement precludes the use of many conventional cladding systems unless the building is fully hoarded during construction. The building enclosure and façade of UBC Tallwood House consists of an innovative prefabricated steel stud rainscreen curtain-wall assembly that is pre-insulated, pre-clad, and has factory installed windows. Design of connections and air and water sealing of panel joints and interfaces was carefully considered given the tall wood structure they were designed to protect. While steel studs were utilized in the panelized structure, feasible curtain-wall designs were also developed and prototyped for wood-framing, CLT, and precast concrete as part of the project. Looking ahead, there will continue to be innovation in design and construction of fast and durable facades for taller wood buildings. New prefabricated panel designs incorporating CLT panels and connection technologies from unitized curtainwall systems are already being developed for the “next tallest” wood buildings in North America.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Use of Sustainable Wood Building Materials in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Slovenia and Sweden

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue836
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Design and Systems
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Obucina, Murco
Kuzman, Manja
Sandberg, Dick
Organization
University of Sarajevo
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Bosnia & Herzegovina
Format
Book/Guide
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Building Materials
Construction
Prefabrication
Slovenia
Sustainable
Sweden
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Bosnia and Herzegovina is the most forested country in the Balkan area, and Sweden and Slovenia are two of the most densely forested countries in the European Union. Living habits differ considerably between these three countries, but the use of wood is very similar. This book grew out of the collaboration of three wood scientists with totally different backgrounds who met and discussed their common interest – wood. Based on the different experiences in each country, the idea was to try to find ways to increase the common knowledge base for the use of wood, achieving excellence in timber design research and education; the architect with a deep knowledge of culture based needs, the engineer with experience and knowledge of technological needs, and the practitioner who always has to find the final solution.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

8 records – page 1 of 1.