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The Design of a Semi-Prefabricated LVL-Concrete Composite Floor

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue103
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Yeoh, David
Fragiacomo, Massimo
Publisher
Hindawi Publishing Corporation
Year of Publication
2012
Country of Publication
Egypt
Format
Journal Article
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Flexural Stiffness Method
Prefabrication
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Advances in Civil Engineering
Summary
This paper describes the design of a novel semi-prefabricated LVL-concrete composite floor that has been developed in New Zealand. In this solution, the floor units made from LVL joists and plywood are prefabricated in the factory and transported to the building site. The units are then lifted onto the supports and connected to the main frames of the building and to the adjacent units. Finally, a concrete topping is poured on top of the units in order to form a continuous slab connecting all the units. Rectangular notches cut from the LVL joists and reinforced with coach screws provide the composite action between the concrete slab and the LVL joists. This system proved to be an effective modular solution that ensures rapid construction. A design procedure based on the use of the effective flexural stiffness method, also known as the “gamma method” is proposed for the design of the composite floor at ultimate and serviceability limit states, in the short and long term. By comparison with the experimental results, it is shown that the proposed method leads to conservative design. A step-by-step design worked example of this novel semi-prefabricated composite floor concludes the paper.
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Development of a Slab-on-Girder Wood-Concrete Composite Highway Bridge

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1421
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Bridges and Spans
Author
Lehan, Andrew
Organization
University of Toronto
Year of Publication
2012
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Bridges and Spans
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Ultra-High-Performance Fibre-Reinforced Concrete
Girder
Post-Tensioning
Prefabrication
Durability
Span-to-Depth Ratio
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This thesis examines the development of a superstructure for a slab-on-girder wood-concrete composite highway bridge. Wood-concrete composite bridges have existed since the 1930's. Historically, they have been limited to spans of less than 10 m. Renewed research interest over the past two decades has shown great potential for longer span capabilities. Through composite action and suitable detailing, improvements in strength, stiffness, and durability can be achieved versus conventional wood bridges. The bridge makes use of a slender ultra-high performance fibre-reinforced concrete (UHPFRC) deck made partially-composite in longitudinal bending with glued-laminated wood girders. Longitudinal external unbonded post-tensioning is utilized to increase span capabilities. Prefabrication using double-T modules minimizes the need for cast-in-place concrete on-site. Durability is realized through the highly impermeable deck slab that protects the girders from moisture. Results show that the system can span up to 30 m while achieving span-to-depth ratios equivalent or better than competing slab-on-girder bridges.
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Free
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Effect of Flexible Supports on Vibration Performance of Timber Floors

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue190
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Jarnerö, Kirsi
Bolmsvik, Åsa
Brandt, Anders
Olsson, Anders
Organization
Euronoise
Year of Publication
2012
Country of Publication
Czech Republic
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Residential
Multi-Storey
Noise
Prefabrication
In Situ
Vibration
Damping
Interlayer
Language
English
Conference
Ninth European Conference on Noise Control (Euronoise)
Research Status
Complete
Notes
June 10-13, 2012, Prague, Czech Republic
Summary
In residential multi-storey buildings of timber it is of great importance to reduce the flanking transmission of noise. Some building systems do this by installing a vibration-damping elastic interlayer, Sylomer or Sylodyn , in the junction between the support and the floor structure. This interlayer also improves the floor vibration performance by adding damping to the structure. In the present work the vibration performance of a floor with such interlayers has been investigated both in laboratory and field tests. A prefabricated timber floor element was tested in laboratory on rigid supports and on supports with four different types of interlayers. The results are compared with in situ tests on a copy of the same floor element. The effect on vibration performance i.e. frequencies, damping ratio and mode shapes is studied. A comparison of the in situ test and the test with elastic interlayer in laboratory shows that the damping in situ is approximately three times higher than on a single floor element in the lab. This indicates that the damping in situ is affected be the surrounding building structure. The achieved damping ratio is highly dependent on the mode shapes. Mode shapes that have high mode shape coefficients along the edges where the interlayer material is located, result in higher modal damping ratios. The impulse velocity response, that is used to evaluate the vibration performance and rate experienced annoyance in the design of wooden joist floors, seems to be reduced when adding elastic layers at the supports.
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Expanding Opportunities for Mid-Rise Buildings in Chile through the Application of Timber Panel Systems

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue193
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Market and Adoption
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Rivera, Cristián
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2012
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Market and Adoption
Seismic
Keywords
Chile
Codes
Mid-Rise
Prefabrication
City Densification
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
During the last few years, the merging of timber building tradition with the application of new technologies has produced new prefabricated building systems in Europe and North America. Mid-rise buildings present a unique opportunity to apply new timber technologies. Chile has shown sustained growth of buildings construction during the past decades but little further development in the use of wood. To establish the feasibility of timber systems applied to the Chilean context this research considered social aspects, technical aspects and local standards related to the manufacture and construction using timber components. A project proposal is used to analyze the architectural applications of timber systems according to the Chilean context. The design considers the case of densification in the city of Santiago and investigates the possibility of developing mid-rise structures using the structural properties and features of timber systems. So far only two systems applied to mid-rise structures have been tested for seismic resistance on full scale prototypes: Midply and Cross Laminated Timber.
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Free
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Prefabricated Timber-Concrete Composite System

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue910
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Moar, Franco
Organization
Lund University
Year of Publication
2012
Country of Publication
Sweden
Format
Thesis
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Keywords
FE model
Bending Tests
Withdrawal Tests
Compression Tests
Self-Tapping Screws
Prefabrication
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Timber-concrete composite structures were originally developed for upgrading existing timber oors, but during last decades, they have new applications in multistorey buildings. Most of the research performed on these structures has focused on systems in which wet concrete is cast on top of timber beams with mounted connectors. Recently investigations on composite systems were performed at Luleå University of Technology in Sweden, in which the concrete slab is prefabricated off-site with the connectors already embedded and then connected on-site to the timber joists. Similar studies have been carried out also on timber-concrete composite structures with prefabricated FRC slabs at Lund University in Sweden. Two kinds of shear connectors were incorporated in the prefabricated FRC concrete slabs. These last systems can be considered globally as partially prefabricated structures because only the slabs were cast off-site with already inserted shear connectors and then the connection with the timber beams is done on the building site. An innovative composite system for floor applications is presented in this thesis. The entire structure is prefabricated off-side, transported and direct mounted to the building on site, that can be seen as full prefabricated structures. Noticeable benefits of a full prefabricated structure are that the moving work from the building site to the workshop reduces construction costs, is more simple and fast of manufacture and erect, and of sure, has better quality, that means more durability. Self-tapping full-threaded screws to connect concrete slabs to timber beam were used. Dimensions of the composite beams and the spacing between the screws has been chosen by discussing different FE model in order to reach the optimal solution. The experimental campaign included: (i) two short-time bending tests carried out on two dierent full-scale specimens, (ii) dynamic tests conducted on one full-scale specimen, (iii) long-time bending test carried out on one full-scale specimen, (iv) compression tests on three cubes of concrete, (v) nine withdrawal tests of the screws with different depth in the concrete. The results of the experimental tests show that the composite beams have a very high level of resistance and stiffness and also allow to reach a high degree of efficiency. Last, comparisons between FE results, analytical calculations and experimental values have been performed and from them it can be concluded that FE model and theoretical calculations well interpret the behavior of the composite structure and provide reliable results.
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