Skip header and navigation

5 records – page 1 of 1.

Experimental Investigation on the Long-Term Behaviour of Prefabricated Timber-Concrete Composite Beams with Steel Plate Connections

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2741
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Connections
Serviceability
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Beams
Author
Shi, Benkai
Liu, Weiqing
Yang, Huifeng
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Beams
Topic
Connections
Serviceability
Keywords
TCC
Prefabrication
Steel Plate
Long-term Behaviour
Interface Slip
Loading
Shear Connections
Deflection
Temperature
Humidity
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Construction and Building Materials
Summary
This paper presents the results of long-term experiments performed on three timber-concrete composite (TCC) beams. An innovative fabricated steel plate connection system, which consists of screws and steel plates embedded in concrete slabs, was adopted in the TCC beam specimens. The adopted shear connection can provide dry-type connection for TCC beams. Steel plates were embedded in concrete slabs while the concrete slab was constructed in factories. The timber beam and concrete slab can be assembled together using screws at the construction site. In this experimental programme, the beam specimens were subjected to constant loading for 613 days in indoor uncontrolled environments. The influence of long-term loading levels and the number of shear connections on the long-term performance of TCC beams was investigated and discussed. The mid-span deflection, timber strain, and interface relative slip at the positions of both connections and beam-ends were recorded throughout the long-term tests. It was found the long-term deflection of the TCC beam increased by approximately 60% while the long-term loads were doubled. Under the influence of the variable temperature and humidity, the TCC specimens with 8 shear connections showed slighter fluctuations compared with the TCC beam with 6 shear connections. In the 613-day observation period, the maximum deflection increment recorded was 6.56 mm for the specimen with eight shear connections and 20% loading level. A rheological model consisting of two Kelvin bodies was employed to fit the curves of creep coefficients. The final deflections predicted of all specimens at the end of 50-year service life were 2.1~2.7 times the initial deflections caused by the applied loads. All beam specimens showed relative small increments in mid-span deflection, strain and relative slip over time without any degradations, demonstrating the excellent long-term performance of TCC beams using the innovative steel plate connection system, which is also easily fabricated.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Harmonization of Structural and Functional Lifespans of Prefabricated Residential Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2744
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Serviceability
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Wood Building Systems
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Kokas, Balázs
Balogh, Jeno
Borsos, Ágnes
Gabriella, Medvegy
Bachmann, Bálint
Publisher
IIETA
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Wood Building Systems
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Serviceability
Design and Systems
Keywords
Prefabrication
Modular
Sustainability
Structural Lifespan
Functional Lifespan
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
International Journal of Design & Nature and Ecodynamics
Summary
Technological developments and social trends can create demand for new building functionalities, necessitating the adaptation of existing buildings. This paper presents the development of a modular building structural system that provides for the harmonization between the structural and functional lifespans of a building in order to achieve greater sustainability. The limitations of the existing prefabricated urban buildings with respect to their adaptability are contrasted with the proposed solution. The use of prefabricated engineered materials, such as cross laminated timber (CLT) and CLT-concrete composites, in conjunction with a modular system, reduces any climatic effects. The inherent advantages of incorporating detachable connections allows for the necessary structural adaptability, subsequently harmonizing and elongating the structural and functional lifespans. The resulting sustainable concept, when applied to residential buildings, could serve as a solution to address projections of future urban growth.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Long-term Testing of Prefabricated Timber-Steel-Concrete Ribbed Decks

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2083
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Serviceability
Material
Steel-Timber Composite
Timber-Concrete Composite
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Bridges and Spans

Performance of Timber-Concrete Portable Bridge with Circular Hollow Section Connectors

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1752
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Serviceability
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Bridges and Spans
Author
Lacis, Raitis
Ozola, Lilita
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Bridges and Spans
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Serviceability
Keywords
Prefabricated
Proof-Load Tests
Deflection
Bending Strains
Bending Stresses
Transversal Load Distribution
Dynamic Amplification Factor
Field Measurements
FEM
Circular Hollow Connectors
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 4997-5005
Summary
This paper presents the research results of a timber-concrete composite portable bridge according to the tests of full-scale structure. Portable timber-concrete bridges can be used for permanent or temporary locations in rural areas such as forests, agricultural fields, mineral extraction pits, military objects and others. All structural elements of...
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Structural Performance Monitoring Technology and Data Visualization Tools and Techniques – Featured Case Study: UBC Tallwood House

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2342
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Moisture
Serviceability
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Columns
Floors
Author
Mustapha, Gamal
Khondoker, Khaleed
Higgins, James
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Columns
Floors
Topic
Moisture
Serviceability
Keywords
Moisture Performance
Vertical Movement
Prefabrication
Language
English
Conference
International Conference on New Horizons in Green Civil Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Wood structures such as the Wood Innovation and Design Center in Prince George and the UBC Tallwood House, an 18 storey, 53-meter-tall mass timber hybrid building are examples of new and innovative wood structures that encompass new construction techniques, unique materials and novel building practices. Empirical data on the condition of critical components and access to the real-time status of the structure during construction gives Architects, Engineers and Contractors critical information to make informed decisions to either validate or improve the construction plan. Data recorded during the life of the building helps validate the design decisions and proves the viability and feasibility of the design. Methods and practices used to monitor both the moisture performance of prefabricated cross laminate timber (CLT) as well as the vertical movement sensing of the building during and after construction are explored in this paper. Moisture content of the CLT panels has been recorded from manufacturing and prefabrication to storage, through transport and during installation and will continue throughout the service life of the building. The calculated and expected displacement of the wood columns is scheduled to take several years as the structure settles, however a first-year analysis and extrapolation of the data was conducted. Monitoring during transport, storage, and construction proved that CLT panels were resilient to moisture issues while in the manufacturers storage, but prone to direct exposure to moisture-related problems regardless of the precautions taken on site. Despite construction during typical Pacific Northwest rain, informed decisions were made to ensure the panel moisture content could decrease to acceptable ranges before continuing to secondary construction phases. The moisture trends observed in the building were proportional to the control samples as both were subjected to similar environmental conditions.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail