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21 records – page 1 of 3.

Ability of Finger-Jointed Lumber to Maintain Load at Elevated Temperatures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1832
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Fire
Material
Other Materials
Author
Rammer, Douglas
Zelinka, Samuel
Hasburgh, Laura
Craft, Steven
Publisher
Forest Products Laboratory
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Journal Article
Material
Other Materials
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Small Scale
Full Scale
Bending Test
Melamine Formaldehyde
Phenol-Resorcinol Formaldehyde
Creep
Polyurethane
Polyvinyl Acetate
Temperature
Durability
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Wood and Fiber Science. 50(1): 44-54.
Online Access
Free
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The Analysis of Bending Stiffness and Strength of Glue Laminated Nigerian Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2579
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Author
Okafor, Kingsley
Ezeagu, Celestine
Publisher
Europa Publishing
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Flexural Strength
Polyurethane
PUR
Adhesive
Timber
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
European Journal of Engineering Research & Science
Summary
An analysis into the flexural strength of solid and laminated timber specimens under working conditions was conducted. Five hardwoods and five softwoods were investigated, namely: Mansonia, Mahogany, Orji, Ukpi, Ufi mmanu, White Afara, Owen, Melina, Akpu and Ubia. The dimensions of the wood specimens are 100mm×50mm×20mm. The wood samples were tested for flexural strength using a Universal Testing Tensile Machine. The results obtained shows that Owen has the highest ultimate wood strength of 46.806N/mm² for the softwood glulam. Ukpi has the highest wood strength of 73.375N/mm² for the hardwood glulam, and highest MOE at 2412.93N/mm². Akpu recorded the weakest sample with bending strength values for glulam at 11.929 N/mm². Comparisons of strength were made to their respective solid timbers. Failure modes were analyzed. The study therefore demonstrates that the timber species used can be engineered to load bearing glulam structural elements using polyurethane adhesive glue without severe loss of strength.
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The Applicability of I-214 Hybrid Poplar as Cross-Laminated Timber Raw Material

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1132
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Markó, Gábor
Bejó, László
Takáts, Péter
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Hungary
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Poplar
Bending Test
Polyurethane
MOE
Low-Grade
Language
Hungarian
Research Status
Complete
Series
Faipar
ISSN
2064-9231
Summary
Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) is a relatively new construction material that has not gained popularity in Hungary yet. Producing such building elements using Hungarian raw materials may help to establish this technique. The purpose of our research was to examine the possibility of producing CLT using Hungarian I-214 hybrid poplar. One three-layer panel was produced using Hungarian hybrid polar and polyurethane resin, and tested in bending. The MOR of the poplar CLT was found to be comparable to low-grade softwood CLT, but the MOE was lower than the requirement. Poplar raw material may be suitable for CLT production by selecting higher grade raw material using nondestructive testing, or as a secondary raw material mixed in with softwood.
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Block Shear Strength and Delamination of Cross-Laminated Timber Fabricated with Japanese Larch

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1220
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Gong, Yingchun
Wu, Guofang
Ren, Haiqing
Publisher
North Carolina State University
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Larch
Delamination
Block Shear Strength
Temperature
One-Component Polyurethane
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
BioResources
Summary
Process parameters of cross-laminated timber (CLT) fabricated with Japanese larch were evaluated. The process parameters were designed by using an orthogonal test including pressure, glue consumption, and adhesive. Both delamination and block shear tests were conducted on CLT in accordance with GB/T 26899 (2011). The results showed that the optimum process parameters were A2B3C2 including pressure (1.2 MPa), glue consumption (200g/m2), and amount of sdhesive (one-component plyurethane). The weight loss and moisture absoption increased when the temperature increased, but the block shear strength decreased as the temperature was raised from 20C to 230C.
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Contribution of Cross Laminated Timber Panels to Room Fires

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue306
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Effective Bonding Parameters for Hybrid Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT)

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1368
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Larkin, Blake
Organization
Oregon State University
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Keywords
North America
Low-Grade
Adhesives
Bond Integrity
Polyurethane
Phenol-Resorcinol Formaldehyde
Lodgepole Pine
Douglas-Fir
Hemlock
Manufacturing
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is a massive engineered wood product made of orthogonally bonded layers of solid-sawn lumber, and is intended for roof, floor, or wall applications. Although it was developed in Europe in the early 90s, CLT is relatively new to North America. CLT products must be certified for structural use. First North American product standard stipulating test methods and qualification criteria for benchmark structural properties and adhesive bond integrity in structural CLT is ANSI/APA PRG320-2012. These methods and criteria have been adapted from existing laminated timber products (glulam), sometimes disregarding substantial differences between parallel laminates and CLT, in which layers are perpendicular to each other. From the point of view of long term sustainability of the CLT industry in North America, the critical questions are: 1. Is it possible to use low-grade timber harvested in the Pacific Northwest region in CLT products without compromising critical engineering parameters? Utilization of low- grade lumber, which is typically under-valued, in value-added engineered products should reduce the pressure on the high end structural lumber supply and may also provide a substantial outlet for lower-grade lumber timber species, including beetle-killed pine (BKP) harvested in the affected areas. 2. Can alternative adhesive systems, currently used in related engineered wood products and manufactured by domestic industry, be successfully used in CLT production? This is an important question, and is related to the fact that polyurethane (PUR) is the primary adhesive currently used by CLT manufacturing industry, and is supplied worldwide by a single Europe-based company. This adhesive is optimized for the species commonly used in CLT products to-date. ANSI/APA PRG320-2012 standard allows alternative adhesive types (PRF and EPI are specifically named), but to-date, only one alternative (MUF) has been used in commercial products. The objective of this project is to determine effective adhesive systems and bonding pressures for the hybrid cross-laminated timber (CLT) combinations. A secondary objective is to evaluate the testing methods prescribed in PRG 320-2012 for cross-laminated bond integrity. Integrity of hybrid CLT layups was evaluated on small specimens derived from CLT billets fabricated in-house using test procedures and qualification criteria specified in ANSI/APA PRG 320-2012 section 8.2.3. Test results were compared to prescribed qualification criteria. The Hybrid CLT combinations for this study include both structural grade lumber and low-grade lumber. For a reference species, lodgepole pine was selected, since it is a member of the US-SPF group closely related to the European species commonly used for CLT construction. The structural-grade, local species will be represented by Douglas-fir, while the low-grade species will be represented by low-grade lodgepole Pine, Douglas-fir, and Western Hemlock. The two adhesive systems investigated were 1) polyurethane-based PUR (currently the most common adhesive used by the CLT industry), which will serve as a reference system, and 2) phenol-resorcinol formaldehyde (PRF), which will represent a potential domestic alternative. PRF was chosen because it is a cold setting adhesive commonly used by the engineered wood products industry in North America; however, no CLT manufacturers utilize this adhesive system. The variables included species combinations (6), adhesive types (2), and clamping pressures (3), with repetition of 9 specimens per combination coming from at least three different CLT billets. The specimen’s bond integrity was assessed by the qualification panel requirements in PRG 320-2012 section 8.2. The qualification tests are block shear and cyclic delamination. A combination must pass both of the test requirements to qualify. The results of the study show that, of the 36 combinations, six failed the block shear test requirements and twenty-five failed the delamination test requirements. The 10 variable combinations that passed both requirements were DDL10F, DDL40F, DPL40F, PPH10F, PPH69F, PPH10U, PPH40U, PPL10U, PPL69U, and PHL69U. Initial inspection of test results show that no single variable that seems to make a significant impact on the bond integrity. It did reveal that no combinations with the use of Douglas-fir as a face material and PUR as an adhesive met the requirement, and only one combination with western hemlock as a core material met the requirements. It is evident that the delamination test was the major restriction on whether or not a combination passes the bond qualification. We believe that the adaption of a delamination test standard designed for layers with parallel grains makes the passing requirement too strict for an orthogonally bonded product. In conclusion, there were 10 combinations that passed both bond integrity test requirements. It was unclear whether the species and/or grade combination, adhesive system, or clamping pressure made the biggest impact on the bond integrity. Relative to the reference adhesive (PUR), and species combination (lodgepole pine), the hybrid panels performed similarly and showed that certain species and/or grade combinations could pass the qualification requirements for specific requirements. The knowledge gained by this screening study will allow further qualification testing of the passing combinations per PRG320-2012. This also has the potential to supply the CLT manufacturing community with greater flexibility of manufacturing techniques and materials, as well as offer value to underutilized lumber.
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Effect of Adhesives and Ply Configuration on the Fire Performance of Southern Pine Cross-Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1682
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Hasburgh, Laura
Bourne, Keith
Peralta, Perry
Mitchell, Phil
Schiff, Scott
Pang, Weichiang
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Connections
Fire
Keywords
Southern Pine
Adhesives
Ply Configuration
Fire Performance
Melamine Formaldehyde
Phenol-Resorcinol Formaldehyde
Polyurethane
Emulsion Polymer Isocyanate
Delamination
Char Rate
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 4031-4038
Summary
Thirteen Southern pine cross-laminated timber panels were tested in the intermediate scale horizontal furnace at the Forest Products Laboratory to determine the effects different adhesives and ply configuration had on fire performance. Four different adhesives were tested: melamine formaldehyde (MF), phenol resorcinol formaldehyde (PRF), polyurethane reactive (PUR), and emulsion polymer isocyanate (EPI). There were two ply configurations: Long-Cross-Long (LCL) or Long-Long-Cross (LLC) where “long” indicates the wood was parallel to the longer edge of the panel. The MF and the PRF prevented delamination and associated problems while the LLC configuration resulted in uneven charring patterns.
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Free
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Effect of Blue Stain on Bond Shear Resistance of Polyurethane Resins Used for Cross-Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2280
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Effect of Manufacturing Parameters on Mechanical Properties of Southern Yellow Pine Cross Laminated Timbers

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1314
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Sharifnia, Houri
Hindman, Daniel
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Netherlands
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Manufacturing
Southern Yellow Pine
Polyurethane
Five Point Bending Test
Bending Stiffness
Bending Strength
Shear Stiffness
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Construction and Building Materials
Summary
Development of cross laminated timber (CLT) manufacturing facilities will require an optimization of manufacturing parameters to ensure efficient production. This study examined the effects of press pressure, press time and the addition of water to bond surfaces for a CLT panel composed of southern pine lumber and polyurethane adhesive. Evaluation of the CLT panels used the five-point bending test for bending stiffness, bending strength and shear stiffness in addition to measuring the resistance to shear by compression loading. The shear strength and percent wood failure values obtained from the resistance to shear by compression loading. The optimal combination of manufacturing parameters studied was 100% press pressure and a press time of 80% of the manufacturer recommendations. The addition of water to the bondline surfaces was deemed unnecessary for CLT materials conforming to the PRG-320 standard. Comparison of mechanical properties with Grade V3 showed higher bending strength and shear stiffness values.
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Evaluating Rolling Shear Strength Properties of Cross Laminated Timber by Torsional Shear Tests and Bending Test

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue307
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Li, Minghao
Lam, Frank
Li, Yuan
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
New Zealand
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
SPF
Polyurethane
Rolling Shear Strength
Torsional Shear Test
Bending Test
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
This paper presents a study on evaluating rolling shear (RS) strength properties of cross laminated timber (CLT) using torsional shear tests and bending tests. The CLT plates were manufactured with Spruce-Pine-Fir boards and glued with polyurethane adhesive. Two types of layups (3-layer and 5-layer) and two clamping pressures (0.1 MPa and 0.4 MPa) were studied. For the torsional shear tests, small shear block specimens were sampled from the CLT plates and the cross layers were processed to have an annular cross section. Strip specimens were simply sampled from the CLT plates for the bending tests. Based on the failure loads, RS strength properties were evaluated by torsional shear formula, composite beam formulae as well as detailed finite element models, respectively. It was found that the two different test methods yielded different average RS strength value for the same type of CLT specimens. The test results showed that the CLT specimens pressed with the higher clamping pressure had slightly higher average RS strength. The specimens with thinner cross layers also had higher RS strength than the specimens with thicker cross layers.
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21 records – page 1 of 3.