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7 records – page 1 of 1.

Designing timber connections for ductility – A review and discussion

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2949
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Connections
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Ottenhaus, Lisa-Mareike
Jockwer, Robert
Drimmelen, David
Crews, Keith
Organization
The University of Queensland
Chalmers University of Technology
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Connections
Keywords
Ductility
Design Codes
Performance-based Design
Research Status
Complete
Series
Construction and Building Materials
Summary
This paper discusses the design principles of timber connections for ductility with focus on laterally-loaded dowel-type fasteners. Timber connections are critical components of timber structures: not only do they join members, but they also affect load capacity, stiffness, and ductility of the overall system. Moreover, due to the brittle failure behaviour of timber when loaded in tension or shear, they are often the only source of ductility and energy dissipation in the structure in case of overloading, much like a fuse in an electrical circuit. This paper addresses current challenges in connection design for ductility, reviews selected best-practice design approaches to ensure ductility in timber connections, suggests simple performance-based design criteria to design connections for ductility, and aims to stimulate a discussion around potential solutions to implement safe design principles for ductile connections in future design codes and connection testing regimes.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Fire Safety of Buildings in Canada

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1866
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Su, Joseph
Organization
National Research Council of Canada
Publisher
Society of Wood Science and Technology
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Fire Safety
Fire Protection
Fire Resistance
Performance Based Design
Building Codes
Research Status
Complete
Series
Wood and Fiber Science
Summary
This article provides an overview of the code requirements pertinent to large cross-laminated timber (CLT) buildings and the methods for meeting the requirements in Canada. Canadian building codes are objective-based. Compliance with the code is achieved by directly applying the acceptable solutions up to certain prescriptive building sizes (height and area) or by developing alternative solutions beyond the height and area limits. The fire safety design for a CLT building larger than the prescriptive limit must demonstrate that the building will achieve at least the minimum level of performance afforded by noncombustible construction in limiting the structural involvement in fire and contribution to the growth and spread of fire during the time required for occupant evacuation and emergency responses.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Glulam Timber Bridges for Local Roads

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2131
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Bridges and Spans

Large-scale compartment fires to develop a self-extinction design framework for mass timber—Part 1: Literature review and methodology

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2911
Year of Publication
2022
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Xu, Hangyu
Pope, Ian
Gupta, Vinny
Cadena, Jaime
Carrascal, Jeronimo
Lange, David
McLaggan, Martyn
Mendez, Julian
Osorio, Andrés
Solarte, Angela
Soriguer, Diana
Torero, Jose
Wiesner, Felix
Zaben, Abdulrahman
Hidalgo, Juan
Organization
The University of Queesland
University of College London
The University of Edinburgh
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2022
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Performance-based Design
Compartment Fires
Heat Transfer
Pretection of Wood
Large-scale
Mass Timber
Research Status
Complete
Series
Fire Safety Journal
Summary
Fire safety remains a major challenge for engineered timber buildings. Their combustible nature challenges the design principles of compartmentation and structural integrity beyond burnout, which are inherent to the fire resistance framework. Therefore, self-extinction is critical for the fire-safe design of timber buildings. This paper is the first of a three-part series that seeks to establish the fundamental principles underpinning a design framework for self-extinction of engineered timber. The paper comprises: a literature review introducing the body of work developed at material and compartment scales; and the design of a large-scale testing methodology which isolates the fundamental phenomena to enable the development and validation of the required design framework. Research at the material scale has consolidated engineering principles to quantify self-extinction using external heat flux as a surrogate of the critical mass loss rate, and mass transfer or Damköhler numbers. At the compartment scale, further interdependent, complex phenomena influencing self-extinction occurrence have been demonstrated. Time-dependent phenomena include encapsulation failure, fall-off of charred lamellae and the burning of the movable fuel load, while thermal feedback is time-independent. The design of the testing methodology is described in reference to these fundamental phenomena.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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NMIT Arts & Media Building—Innovative structural design of a three storey post-tensioned timber building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2851
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Author
Holden, Tony
Devereux, Carl
Haydon, Shane
Buchanan, Andrew
Pampanin, Stefano
Organization
Aurecon New Zealand
PTL Structural Timber Consultants
University of Canterbury
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Journal Article
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Performance Based Design
Post-Tensioned Timber
Multi-Storey
Plastic Fuse
Research Status
Complete
Series
Case Studies in Structural Engineering
Summary
The NMIT Arts & Media Building in Nelson, New Zealand is the first in a new generation of multi-storey timber structures. It employs a number of innovative timber technologies including an advanced damage avoidance earthquake design that is a world first for a timber building. Aurecon structural engineers are the first to use this revolutionary Pres-Lam technology developed at the University of Canterbury. This technology marks a fundamental change in design philosophy. Conventional seismic design of multi-storey structures typically depends on member ductility and the acceptance of a certain amount of damage to beams, columns or walls. The NMIT seismic system relies on pairs of coupled timber shear walls that incorporate high strength steel tendons post-tensioned through a central duct. The walls are centrally fixed allowing them to rock during a seismic event. A series of U-shaped steel plates placed between the walls form a coupling mechanism, and act as dissipaters to absorb seismic energy. The design allows the primary structure to remain essentially undamaged in a major earthquake while readily replaceable connections act as plastic fuses. With a key focus on sustainability the extensive use of timber and engineered-wood products such as laminated veneer lumber (LVL) makes use of a local natural resource, all grown and manufactured within an 80 km radius of Nelson. This IstructE award winning project demonstrates that there are now cost effective, sustainable and innovative solutions for multi-storey timber buildings with potential applications for building owners in seismic areas around the world.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Performance-Based Approach to Support Tall and Large Wood Buildings: Fire and Seismic Performance

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1982
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Design and Systems
Fire
Seismic
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Dagenais, Christian
Chen, Zhiyong
Popovski, Marjan
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2017
Format
Report
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Fire
Seismic
Keywords
Performance Based Design
National Building Code of Canada
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The objective of the current project is to develop a performance-based design process for wood-based design systems that would meet the objectives and functional statements set forth in the National Building Code of Canada. More specifically, this report discusses the fire and seismic performance of buildings, as identified as a priority in a previous FPInnovations report (Dagenais, C. (2016). Development of Performance Criteria for Wood-Based Building Systems).
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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State-of-the-Art Review of Displacement-Based Seismic Design of Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2123
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Loss, Christiano
Tannert, Thomas
Tesfamariam, Solomon
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Performance Based Design
Direct Displacement-Based Design
Hybrid Structures
N2 Method
Design Procedures
Research Status
Complete
Series
Construction and Building Materials
Summary
This paper discusses the state-of-the-art of displacement-based seismic design (DBD) methods and their applications to timber buildings. First, an in-depth review of the DBD methods is presented, focusing in particular on the direct, modal and N2 methods. Then, paper presents DBD application on a wide range of construction systems, including both traditional light-frame structures as well as the emerging sector of tall and hybrid timber buildings. Finally, potentials of using these DBD methods for seismic design as well as possible implications of including DBD within the next generation of building codes are discussed.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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7 records – page 1 of 1.