Skip header and navigation

5 records – page 1 of 1.

Construction Cost Analysis of High-performance Multi-unit Residential Buidlings in British Columbia

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2792
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Cost
Energy Performance
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Organization
Zero Emissions Building Exchange
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Cost
Energy Performance
Keywords
BC Energy Step Code
Net Zero Energy Ready
Mid-Rise
Passive House
Construction Cost
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Does it really cost more to build a high-performance building? Historically, this question has been addressed with theoretical studies based on varying the design of common building archetypes, but nothing beats the real thing. ZEBx, in partnership with BTY Group and seven builders from across BC, has completed a cost analysis of seven high-performance, wood-framed, mid-rise, multi-unit residential buildings that meet Step 4 of the Energy Step Code or the Passive House standard. The results of the study may surprise you!
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

In-Situ and Predicted Performance of a Certified Industrial Passive House Building under Future Climate Scenarios

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2979
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Environmental Impact
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Conroy, Alison
Mukhopadhyaya, Phalguni
Wimmers, Guido
Organization
University of Northern British Columbia
University of Victoria
Editor
Dodoo, Ambrose
Wakili, Ghazi
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Passive House
Climate Modeling
Climate Change
Hygrothermall Behavior
WUFI
Research Status
Complete
Series
Buildings
Summary
The Wood Innovation Research Lab was designed as a low energy-use building to facilitate the construction and testing of engineered wood products by the faculty and staff of the Master of Engineering in Integrated Wood Design Program at the University of Northern British Columbia in Prince George, BC, Canada. Constructed using a 533 mm thick-wall and 659 mm flat roof assembly, it received certification as Canada’s first industrial facility built to the International Passive House standard. Temperature and humidity sensors were installed in the north and south exterior wall assemblies to measure long-term hygrothermal performance. Data collected between 2018–2020 shows no record of long-term moisture accumulation within the exterior assemblies. Data collected during this time period was used to validate hygrothermal performance models for the building created using the WUFI® Plus software. Long-term performance models created using future climate data for five cities across Canada under two global warming scenarios shows favorable results, with an increase in average annual temperatures resulting in lower average relative humidity values at the interior face of the exterior sheathing board in the exterior wall assemblies.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Mass Timber Envelopes in Passivhaus Buildings: Designing for Moisture Safety in Hot and Humid Australian Climates

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2840
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Moisture
Energy Performance
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Building Envelope
Author
Strang, Marcus
Leardini, Paola
Brambilla, Arianna
Gasparri, Eugenia
Organization
University of Queensland
University of Sydney
Editor
Medved, Sergej
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Building Envelope
Topic
Moisture
Energy Performance
Keywords
Hygrothermal
Moisture Safety
Durability
Passive House
Envelope
Research Status
Complete
Series
Buildings
Summary
The uptake of buildings employing cross-laminated timber (CLT) assemblies and designed to Passivhaus standard has accelerated internationally over the past two decades due to several factors including responses to the climate crisis by decarbonising the building stock. Structural CLT technology and the Passivhaus certification both show measurable benefits in reducing energy consumption, while contributing to durability and indoor comfort. However, there is a general lack of evidence to support a fast uptake of these technologies in Australia. This paper responds to the compelling need of providing quantitative data and adoption strategies; it explores their combined application as a potential pathway for climate-appropriate design of energy-efficient and durable mass timber envelope solutions for subtropical and tropical Australian climates. Hygrothermal risk assessments of interstitial condensation and mould growth of CLT wall assemblies inform best-practice design of mass timber buildings in hot and humid climates. This research found that the durability of mass timber buildings located in hot and humid climates may benefit from implementing the Passivhaus standard to manage interior conditions. The findings also suggested that climate-specific design of the wall assembly is critical for mass timber buildings, in conjunction with excellent stormwater management practices during construction and corrosion protection for metallic fasteners.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Passive Cross Laminated Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue24
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Energy Performance
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Helling, Håkan
Janols, Henrik
Brännström, Matias
Organization
Dalarna University
Year of Publication
2013
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Energy Performance
Keywords
Climate
Concrete
Construction
Costs
Economic Analysis
Passive House
Research Status
Complete
Summary
In this project, Stora Enso’s newly developed building system has been further developed to allow building to the Swedish passive house standard for the Swedish climate. The building system is based on a building framework of CLT (Cross laminated timber) boards. The concept has been tested on a small test building. The experience gained from this test building has also been used for planning a larger building (two storeys with the option of a third storey) with passive house standard with this building system.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

A Sustainable Approach to Build Insulated External Timber Frame Walls for Passive Houses Using Natural and Waste Materials

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3044
Year of Publication
2022
Topic
Energy Performance
Environmental Impact
Application
Walls
Author
Georgescu, Sergiu-Valeriu
Sova, Daniela
Campean, Mihaela
Cosereanu, Camelia
Organization
Transilvania University of Brasov
Editor
Zelinka, Samuel L.
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2022
Format
Journal Article
Application
Walls
Topic
Energy Performance
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Timber Frame Walls
Thermal Insulation
Passive House
Natural Materials
Waste Materials
Research Status
Complete
Series
Forests
Summary
This paper presents structures of timber-framed walls designed for passive houses, using natural and waste resources as insulation materials, such as wool, wood fibers, ground paper, reeds (Phragmites communis), and Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) wastes. The insulation systems of stud walls composed of wool–ABS composite boards and five types of fillers (wool, ABS, wood fibers, ground paper, and reeds) were investigated to reach U-value requirements for passive houses. The wall structures were designed at a thickness of 175 mm, including gypsum board for internal wall lining and oriented strand board (OSB) for the exterior one. The testing protocol of thermal insulation properties of wall structures simulated conditions for indoor and outdoor temperatures during the winter and summer seasons using HFM-Lambda laboratory equipment. In situ measurements of U-values were determined for the experimental wall structures during winter time, when the temperature differences between outside and inside exceeded 10 °C. The results recorded for the U-values between 0.20 W/m2K and 0.35 W/m2K indicate that the proposed structures are energy-efficient walls for passive houses placed in the temperate-continental areas. The vapour flow rate calculation does not indicate the presence of condensation in the 175 mm thick wall structures, which proves that the selected thermal insulation materials are not prone to degradation due to condensation. The research is aligned to the international trend in civil engineering, oriented to the design and construction of low-energy buildings on the one hand and the use of environmentally friendly or recycled materials on the other.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail