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72 records – page 2 of 8.

Cross Laminated Timber Shear Wall Connections for Seismic Applications

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2405
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Falk, Michael
Publisher
Kansas State University
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Keywords
Panels
Earthquake
Rocking Walls
Shear Walls
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Cross Laminated Timber Shear Wall Connections for Seismic Applications

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2406
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Falk, Michael
Publisher
Kansas State University
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Keywords
Panels
Earthquake
Rocking Walls
Shear Walls
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Damage Assessment of Cross Laminated Timber Connections Subjected to Simulated Earthquake Loads

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue70
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Schneider, Johannes
Stiemer, Siegfried
Tesfamariam, Solomon
Karacabeyli, Erol
Popovski, Marjan
Year of Publication
2012
Country of Publication
New Zealand
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Keywords
Damage
Panels
North American Market
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
July 15-19, 2012, Auckland, New Zealand
Summary
Wood-frame is the most common construction type for residential buildings in North America. However, there is a limit to the height of the building using a traditional wood-frame structure. Cross-laminated timber (CLT) provides possible solutions to mid-...
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Damping in Timber Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue106
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Floors
Beams

Design Methodology Analysis of Cross-Laminated Timber Elements Subjected to Flexure

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue7
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Ceilings
Floors
Walls
Author
Vilguts, Aivars
Serdjuks, Dmitrijs
Mierinš, Imants
Publisher
Kaunas University of Technology
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Lithuania
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Ceilings
Floors
Walls
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Design
Flexural
FEM method
Testing
Panels
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Sustainable Architecture and Civil Engineering
ISSN
2335–2000
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Development of CLT Panels Bond-in Method for Seismic Retrofitting of RC Frame Structure

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1860
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Frames
Author
Haba, Ryota
Kitamori, Akihisa
Mori, Takuro
Fukuhara, Takeshi
Kurihara, Takaaki
Isoda, Hiroshi
Publisher
J-STAGE
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Japan
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Frames
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Retrofit
Earthquake
Panels
Adhesive
Bonding
Language
Japanese
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Structural and Construction Engineering: Transactions of AIJ
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Diagrams for Stress and Deflection Prediction in Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) Panels with Non-Classical Boundary Conditions

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2719
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Obradovic, Nikola
Todorovic, Marija
Marjanovic, Miroslav
Damnjanovic, Emilija
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Stress
Deflection
Eurocode 5
Layerwise Plate Theory
Panels
Language
English
Conference
International Conference on Contemporary Theory and Practice in Construction
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Invention of cross-laminated timber (CLT) was a big milestone for building with wood. Due to novelty of CLT and timber’s complex mechanical behavior, the existing design codes cover only rectangular CLT panels, simply supported along 2 parallel or all 4 edges, making numerical methods necessary in other cases. This paper presents a practical engineering tool for stress and deflection prediction of CLT panels with non-classical boundary conditions, based on the software for the computational analysis of laminar composites, previously developed by the authors. Diagrams applicable in engineering practice are developed for some common cases. The presented methodology could be a basis for more detailed design handbooks and guidelines for various layouts of CLT panels and different types of loadings.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Direct Displacement Based Design of A Novel Hybrid Structure: Steel Moment-Resisting Frames with Cross Laminated Timber Infill Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue15
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls

Dynamic Response of Cross Laminated Timber Floors Subject to Internal Loads

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2716
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Skoglund, Jacob
Publisher
Lund University
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Internal Loads
Finite Element Method (FEM)
Panels
Seven-Layer Model
Modal Analysis
3D Model
2D Model
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The deregulation of timber for use in large scale constructions has seen the addition of new innovative timber-based products to a category of products referred to as engineered wood products. A now well established addition to these products is cross laminated timber, or CLT for short. CLT products use a form of orthogonal layering, where several parallel wooden boards are arranged in a number of layers, each layer being orthogonal to the previous. The use of orthogonal layering allows for increased stiffness in the two plane directions, resulting in a lightweight construction product with high load bearing capacity and stiffness. To evaluate the dynamic behaviour of structures, engineers commonly apply the finite element method, where a system of equations are solved numerically. Given a sufficient amount of computational power and time, the finite element method can help to solve most dynamical problems. For sufficiently large or complex structures the amount of resources needed may be outside the scope of possibility or feasibility for many. Therefore, evaluating the usage of certain design simplifications, such as omitting to models aspects of the geometry, or alternative forms of analysis for CLT panels may help to reduce the time and resources required for an analysis. In this Master's dissertation, a seven-layer CLT-panel has been created. In the model, each individual board and the gaps between the boards are modelled. The seven-layer model is used as a reference to evaluate the possibility of using less detailed alternative models. The alternative models are created as a layered 3D model and a composite 2D model, both models omit the modelling of the individual laminations, resulting in the layers being solid. The results show small errors for the alternative models when using modal analysis. Concluding that the modal behaviour and dynamic response of a CLT panel can be evaluated using a composite 2D model or a less-detailed layered 3D model. This significantly reduces the amount of time and computational power needed for an analysis, and clearly indicates the benefit of using alternative less detailed models.
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Free
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Effects of Heavy Topping on Vibrational Performance of Cross-Laminated Timber Floor Systems

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2708
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Schwendy, Benjamin
Publisher
Clemson University
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Vibration Serviceability
Concrete Topping
Panels
Insulation
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) is gaining momentum as a competitor to steel and concrete in the construction industry. However, with CLT being relatively new to North America, it is being held back from realizing its full potential by a lack of research in various areas, such as vibration serviceability. This has resulted in vague design guidelines, leading to either overly conservative designs, hurting profit margins, or leading to overly lenient designs, resulting in occupancy discomfort. Eliminating these design inefficiencies is paramount to expanding the use of CLT and creating a more sustainable construction industry. This thesis focuses on the effect of a heavy topping, in this case 2" of concrete over a layer of rigid insulation, on a CLT floor. To this end, modal analysis was performed on two spans of three CLT panels in the Andy Quattlebaum Outdoor Education Center at Clemson University. By performing a series of instrumented heel-drop tests with a roving grid of accelerometers, the natural frequencies, mode shapes, frequency response functions, and damping coefficients were determined. By comparing the results to several different numerical models, the most appropriate model was selected for use in future design. In addition, a walking excitation test was performed to calculate the root mean square acceleration of the floor for comparison to current design standards. This study found that, with a layer of rigid insulation separating the topping and the panel, the system behaved predictably like a non-composite system. The resultant mode shapes also verified that the boundary conditions behaved very close to “hinged” and showed that the combination of the surface splines and the continuous topping provide significant transverse continuity in terms of response to vibrations. Lastly, the results of the walking excitation test showed that, with some further study, the current design standards for steel vibration serviceability can be applied to great effect to CLT systems.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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72 records – page 2 of 8.