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9 records – page 1 of 1.

Cyclic Response of Insulated Steel Angle Brackets Used for Cross-Laminated Timber Connections

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2765
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Seismic
Acoustics and Vibration
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Author
Kržan, Meta
Azinovic, Boris
Publisher
Springer
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Topic
Seismic
Acoustics and Vibration
Connections
Keywords
Angle Bracket
Sound Insulation
Insulation
Monotonic Test
Cyclic Tests
Wall-to-Floor
Stiffness
Load Bearing Capacity
Shear
Tensile
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
European Journal of Wood and Wood Products
Summary
In cross-laminated timber (CLT) buildings, in order to reduce the disturbing transmission of sound over the flanking parts, special insulation layers are used between the CLT walls and slabs, together with insulated angle-bracket connections. However, the influence of such CLT connections and insulation layers on the seismic resistance of CLT structures has not yet been studied. In this paper, experimental investigation on CLT panels installed on insulation bedding and fastened to the CLT floor using an innovative, insulated, steel angle bracket, are presented. The novelty of the investigated angle-bracket connection is, in addition to the sound insulation, its resistance to both shear as well as uplift forces as it is intended to be used instead of traditional angle brackets and hold-down connections to simplify the construction. Therefore, monotonic and cyclic tests on the CLT wall-to-floor connections were performed in shear and tensile/compressive load direction. Specimens with and without insulation under the angle bracket and between the CLT panels were studied and compared. Tests of insulated specimens have proved that the insulation has a marginal influence on the load-bearing capacity; however, it significantly influences the stiffness characteristics. In general, the experiments have shown that the connection could also be used for seismic resistant CLT structures, although some minor improvements should be made.
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Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Novel Steel-Timber-Hybrid System

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue81
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Bhat, Pooja
Azim, Riasat
Popovski, Marjan
Tannert, Thomas
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Connections
Keywords
Tall Wood
Timber-Steel Hybrid
FFTT
Quasi-Static
Monotonic Testing
Cyclic Testing
Strong-column Weak-beam Failure
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
This paper summarises the experimental and numerical investigation conducted on the main connection of a novel steel-timber hybrid system called FFTT. The component behaviour of the hybrid system was investigated using quasi-static monotonic and reversed cyclic tests. Different steel profiles (wide flange I-sections and hollow rectangular sections) and embedment approaches for the steel profiles (partial and full embedment) were tested. The results demonstrated that when using an appropriate connection layout, the desired strong-column weak-beam failure mechanism was initiated and excessive wood crushing was avoided. A numerical model was developed that reasonably reflected the real component behaviour and can subsequently be used for numerical sensitivity studies and parameter optimization. The research presented herein serves as a precursor for providing design guidance for the FFTT system as an option for tall wood-hybrid buildings in seismic regions.
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Experimental Investigation of Connection for the FFTT, A Timber-Steel Hybrid System

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue269
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Bhat, Pooja
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
FFTT
Quasi-Static
Monotonic Testing
Reverse Cyclic Testing
Embedment Depth
Embedment Length
Strong-column Weak-beam Failure
Cross-Section Reduction
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This thesis fills the existing knowledge gap between detailed design and global behaviour of hybrid systems through an experimental study on an innovative timber-steel hybrid system called “FFTT”. The FFTT system relies on wall panels of mass timber such as CLT for gravity and lateral load resistance and embedded steel sections for ductility under the earthquake loads. An important step towards the practical application of the FFTT system is obtaining the proof that the connections facilitate the desired ductile failure mode. The experimental investigation was carried out at the facility of FPInnovations, Vancouver. The testing program consisted of quasi-static monotonic and reverse cyclic tests on the timber-steel hybrid system with different configurations. The two beam profiles, wide flange I-sections and hollow rectangular sections were tested. The interaction between the steel beams and CLT panels and the effect of the embedment depth, cross-section reduction and embedment length were closely examined. The study demonstrated that when using an appropriate steel section, the desired ‘Strong Column–Weak Beam’ failure mechanism was initiated and excessive wood crushing was avoided. While wide-flange I-sections were stiffer and stronger, the hollow sections displayed better post-yield behaviour with higher energy dissipation capacity through several cycles of deformation under cyclic loads. The out-of-plane buckling at the point of yielding was the major setback of the embedment of wide-flange I-sections. This research served as a precursor for providing design guidance for the FFTT system as one option for tall wood buildings in high seismic regions.
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Influence of Steel Properties on the Ductility of Doweled Timber Connections

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2789
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Author
Geiser, Martin
Bergmann, M.
Follesa, Maurizio
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Ductility
Strength
Monotonic Test
Cyclic Tests
Dowel Type Fastener
Serial Yielding
Doweled Connections
Capacity Design
Strain Hardening Ratio
Steel
Seismic
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Construction and Building Materials
Summary
In the seismic design of structures according to the dissipative structural behaviour, the connection ductility is crucial in order to ensure the desired level of energy dissipation of the overall structure. Therefore, in case of ductile zones composed of dowel-type fasteners arranged in series, it is important to ensure that all the fasteners can fully develop their energy dissipation capacity by plastic deformations. However, when different types of connections made of two symmetrical and serially arranged assemblies of dowel-type fasteners are tested, it often appears that only few fasteners fully work in the plastic region while most of the remaining ones exhibit very low yielding. Looking at the causes of this dysfunction, a possible explanation is due to the fact that the rules for the seismic design of dissipative zones in timber structures given in international codes and used in common practice often make reference only to the steel quality of the dowel-type fasteners specifying a minimum tensile strength or sometime, like is the case of the current version of Eurocode 8, only to maximum values of the dowel-type fastener diameter and of the thickness of the connected timber or wood-based members. Also, the research conducted so far about the ductile behaviour of serially arranged connections was not focused on the post-elastic properties of steel. However, for the seismic design of ductile zones of other materials, such as for example is the case of reinforced concrete walls, post-elastic characteristics of steel are required for the reinforcing bars, in order to achieve the desired dissipative behaviour. Inspired by this fact, timber connections composed of serially arranged dowels made of steel grades with different hardening ratio and elongation at maximum tensile stress were fabricated and tested. The purpose of this work is to understand if the use of steel with significant post-elastic properties may help to solve the problem of limited yielding in serially arranged dowel-type connections. The tested specimens were composed of two symmetrical timber members made of Glulam and LVL connected to two 6 mm thick slotted-in steel plates by means of 9 steel dowels with a diameter of 6.0 mm, which were subjected to monotonic and cyclic tests carried out by implementing dowels made of steel with favourable post-elastic properties. The results showed that the simultaneous yielding of two serially arranged dowelled assemblies is possible, although not fully. Moreover, assuming as reference the steel grade with the lowest post-elastic properties, the connection ductility and strength measured through monotonic and cyclic tests increased by about 30% for the steel grades with the highest hardening ratio and elongation at maximum tensile stress, whereas the displacement at maximum strength was about five times higher. In addition, it was found that confinement of the timber members and shaping of holes were crucial in order to avoid undesired and premature brittle failures and to increase the connection strength and ductility. The results obtained may be useful in order to bring a reassessment of the code requirements regarding the steel properties of ductile connections as well as of certain principles of dimensioning and detailing.
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Monotonic and Cyclic Testing of Cross-Laminated Timber Diaphragms

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2712
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Beairsto, Cody
Publisher
Oregon State University
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Diaphragm
In-Plane Tests
Monotonic Test
Cyclic Tests
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Mass timber is emerging as a viable form of construction around the world in new markets for wood buildings. The entrance into these markets has driven the demand for more knowledge to enable designs alongside other structural materials such as steel and reinforced concrete. Large, in-plane tests on cross-laminated timber (CLT) diaphragms (4570 mm x 4570 mm [15 ft x 15 ft]) are used to quantify ductility through the diaphragm force reduction factor (Rs) from ASCE 7-16, m-factors from ASCE 41-17, and validate common methodologies of mass timber design currently implemented in structural engineering practice. The tests demonstrate that cross-laminated timber can function well as a diaphragm with a mean Rs value of 1.19 at indicate a ductility like precast concrete diaphragms with R_s=0.7-1.4. Like precast concrete systems, cross-laminated timber diaphragms depend heavily on the inter-panel connections for a ductile design and will require several categories to classify the types of CLT systems. Analysis methods from ASTM E455 validate the assumptions that a CLT diaphragm is shear-controlled in its behavior for purposes of determining Rs. M-factors are an indirect measurement of the nonlinear deformation capacity of a component and are used as a multiplier to the expected strength of a component. The m-factors observed (0.46 to 1.9 for Immediate Occupancy to Collapse Protection performance levels, respectively) resulted in lower than values from previous studies on similar panel-to-panel connections. The initial stiffness of the large diaphragm panel-to-panel connections, 6.86 kN/mm (39.8 kip/in), were lower than the spline stiffness estimates of 11.5 kN/mm (65.7 kip/in) based on individual fastener tests. The hysteretic loading resulted in lower spline stiffnesses 4.37 kN/mm (24.9 kip/in) while the monotonic testing showed a mean spline stiffness of 9.04 kN/mm (52.5 kip/in). Calculating CLT diaphragm displacement based on NDS methods proved to be conservative compared to test results for the purposes of determining ASCE 7-16 diaphragm flexibility status.
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Free
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Multi-Storey Continuous CLT Shear Wall Testing

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2646
Topic
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Organization
Fast + Epp
Country of Publication
Canada
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Topic
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Monotonic Test
Reverse Cyclic Test
Research Status
In Progress
Summary
To support the associated elementary school projects in pushing the boundaries forward for wood construction in seismic zones, this testing project aims to establish the seismic behaviour of two-storey continuous cross-laminated (CLT) timber shear walls in comparison to typical single-storey CLT shear walls and ensure they are able to provide necessary ductility in a seismic event. Working with the University of Northern British Columbia (UNBC), Fast + Epp aimed to complete a series of monotonic and reversed cyclic tests on CLT shear walls. The test setup was developed to determine the behaviour of these types of shear walls for the project specific application, as well as provide a basis to further develop this type of system for the engineering community. The multi-storey continuous CLT panel shear walls will allow for more efficient and cost-effective construction – reducing construction time, material handling, and the number of connectors required. The lab testing of these shear walls is complete, with data analysis underway. Results are intended to be published in 2021.
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Numerical and Experimental Investigations of Connection for Timber-Steel Hybrid System

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue213
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Azim, Riasat
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Keywords
FFTT
Mid-Rise
Timber-Steel Hybrid
Quasi-Static
Monotonic Testing
Reverse Cyclic Testing
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
In recent years, hybrid systems have grown in popularity as potential solution for mid-rise construction. There is also an increased interest in using timber for such systems. The lack of established design guidance, however, has tabled the practical implementation of timber-based hybrid structures. The aim of this thesis is to address the existing knowledge gap regarding the detailed connection design of hybrid systems through combined experimental and numerical investigations on a novel timber-steel system called “FFTT”. The FFTT system relies on wall panels of mass timber such as Cross-Laminated-Timber (CLT) for gravity and lateral load resistance and embedded steel beam sections to provide ductility under seismic loading. A vital step towards practical implementation of the FFTT system is to obtain the proof that the connections facilitate the desired ‘strong column – weak beam’ failure mechanism. The numerical work applied the software ANSYS; a parametric study based on the results of previous tests was conducted to obtain a suitable connection configuration for improved structural performance. The experimental work, carried out at FPInnovations, consisted of quasi-static monotonic and reversed cyclic tests on two different connection configurations: fully and partially embedded ASTM wide flange sections in combination with 7 ply CLT panels. The combination of partial embedment length and full embedment depth, even when using the smallest wide flange section, did not facilitate the desired behavior. The connection performance was significantly improved when reducing the embedment depth (to avoid creating stress peaks on a weak cross layer) and increasing the embedment length (larger center to center distance between bearing plates). The used small size steel beam, however, is not practical for a real structure; therefore, further studies with larger beams and a modified geometry are recommended before the FFTT system can be applied in practice.
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Free
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Perforated Plate Testing

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2647
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Connections
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Organization
Fast + Epp
Country of Publication
Canada
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Connections
Keywords
Braced Frames
Dissipation
Cyclic Tests
Monotonic Test
GCWood
Language
English
Research Status
In Progress
Summary
As part of Fast + Epp’s ongoing work to push the boundaries of Tall Wood construction in seismic zones, this testing program aims to develop a new dissipative system for use in timber braced frames or other timber lateral systems where the connections provide energy dissipation. The connections are designed to dissipate energy through ductile steel plates to provide robust and well understood dissipative systems. In collaboration with the Advanced Research in Timber Systems’ team at the University of Alberta, Fast + Epp is working on a four-phase testing program for cyclic and monotonic testing of various configurations of perforated plate connections. Small scale tests have been completed on perforated plates, and entire connections will be examined in advance of a full-scale timber brace frame test to evaluate the overall behaviour. One phase of physical testing was completed in January 2020, with the next 3 phases intended to be completed in 2021. Initial data analysis of the first phase testing has resulted in tuning of the system in advance of later phase testing. Results on the first two or three phases of testing are anticipated to be completed in 2020 with initial publication of the results in early 2021.
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Seismic Performance of Embedded Steel Beam Connection in Cross-Laminated Timber Panels for Tall-Wood Hybrid System

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue415
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Zhang, Xiaoyue
Azim, Riasat
Bhat, Pooja
Popovski, Marjan
Tannert, Thomas
Publisher
Canadian Science Publishing
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Timber-Steel Hybrid
Energy Dissipation
FFTT
Quasi-Static
Monotonic Test
Reverse Cyclic Test
Failure mechanism
Beam Profiles
Embedment
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Canadian Journal of Civil Engineering
Summary
Recent developments in novel engineered mass timber products and connection systems have created the possibility to design and construct tall timber-based buildings. This research presents the experiments conducted on the steel-wood connection as main energy dissipating part of a novel steel–timber hybrid system labelled Finding the Forest Through the Trees (FFTT). The performance was investigated using quasi-static monotonic and reversed cyclic tests. The influence of different steel beam profiles (wide flange I-sections and hollow rectangular sections), and the embedment approaches (partial and full embedment) was investigated. The test results demonstrated that appropriate connection layouts can lead to the desired failure mechanism while avoiding excessive crushing of the mass timber panels. The research can serve as a precursos for developing design guidelines for the FFTT systems as an option for tall wood-hybrid building systems in seismic regions.
Copyright
Courtesy of Canadian Science Publishing
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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9 records – page 1 of 1.