Skip header and navigation

24 records – page 1 of 3.

An integrated design tool for timber plate structures to generate joints geometry, fabrication toolpath, and robot trajectories

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2959
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Connections
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Rogeau, Nicolas
Latteur, Pierre
Weinand, Yves
Organization
École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne
Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich
Louvain School of Engineering
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Connections
Keywords
Integrated Design
Timber Plate Structures
Wood Joints
Digital Fabrication
CNC Machining
Robotic Assembly
Robotic Arm
Modular Assembly
Assembly Sequence
Insertion Vector
Research Status
Complete
Series
Automation in Construction
Summary
This paper presents an integrated design tool for structures composed of engineered timber panels that are connected by traditional wood joints. Recent advances in computational architecture have permitted to automate the fabrication and assembly of such structures using Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machines and industrial robotic arms. While several large-scale demonstrators have been realized, most developed algorithms are closed-source or project-oriented. The lack of a general framework makes it difficult for architects, engineers and designers to effectively manipulate this innovative construction system. Therefore, this research aims at developing a holistic design tool targeting a wide range of architectural applications. Main achievements include: (1) a new data structure to deal with modular assemblies, (2) an analytical parametrization of the geometry of five timber joints, (3) a method to generate CNC toolpath while integrating fabrication constraints, and (4) a method to automatically compute robot trajectories for a given stack of timber plates.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Assessment of effect of climate change on hygrothermal performance of cross-laminated timber building envelope with modular construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2890
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Moisture
Serviceability
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Building Envelope
Author
Chang, Seong Jin
Kang, Yujin
Yun, Beom Yeol
Yang, Sungwoong
Kim, Sumin
Organization
Gyeongsang National University
Yonsei University
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Building Envelope
Topic
Moisture
Serviceability
Keywords
Climate Change
Modular Construction
Hygrothermal Performance
Mock-up Experiments
Research Status
Complete
Series
Case Studies in Thermal Engineering
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) modular construction possesses the advantages of wood, such as excellent carbon storage and thermal insulation, and of modular construction, such as considerably reduced construction period and cost as well as high productivity. This study evaluates the hygrothermal performance of CLT walls considering modular construction in future climatic conditions. Firstly, CLT walls with plywood applied to a core layer were manufactured. A mock-up of a CLT building was produced and its construction process was analyzed. Hygrothermal behavior of the CLT walls was simulated using WUFI simulation program, and the predicted results were verified against measurements obtained from the mock-up experiment. Finally, the hygrothermal performance of the CLT wall was evaluated for four types of insulation and future climate in eight cities of USA. The coefficient of variation—root mean square error (CV(RMSE))—of the temperature and relative humidity inside the ply-lam CLT wall from mock-up experiments and simulation evaluation were 6.43% and 7.02%, respectively, which met the validation criteria. Based on the hygrothermal performance, the ply-lam CLT wall with extruded polystyrene insulation was evaluated as safe from moisture problems in all the eight cities considered in this study. However, the risk of mold growth in all regions and insulation types increased under climate change with a rise of average annual temperature.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Climate Effects of Forestry and Substitution of Concrete Buildings and Fossil Energy

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2774
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Gustavsson, L.
Nguyen, T.
Sathre, Roger
Tettey, U.Y.A.
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Climate Change
Modular Construction
Carbon Emissions
Forest Management
Research Status
Complete
Series
Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews
Summary
Forests can help mitigate climate change in different ways, such as by storing carbon in forest ecosystems, and by producing a renewable supply of material and energy products. We analyse the climate implications of different scenarios for forestry, bioenergy and wood construction. We consider three main forestry scenarios for Kronoberg County in Sweden, over a 201-year period. The Business-as-usual scenario mirrors today's forestry while in the Production scenario the forest productivity is increased by 40% through more intensive forestry. In the Set-aside scenario 50% of forest land is set-aside for conservation. The Production scenario results in less net carbon dioxide emissions and cumulative radiative forcing compared to the other scenarios, after an initial period of 30–35 years during which the Set-aside scenario has less emissions. In the end of the analysed period, the Production scenario yields strong emission reductions, about ten times greater than the initial reduction in the Set-aside scenario. Also, the Set-aside scenario has higher emissions than Business-as-usual after about 80 years. Increasing the harvest level of slash and stumps results in climate benefits, due to replacement of more fossil fuel. Greatest emission reduction is achieved when biomass replaces coal, and when modular timber buildings are used. In the long run, active forestry with high harvest and efficient utilisation of biomass for replacement of carbon-intensive non-wood products and fuels provides significant climate mitigation, in contrast to setting aside forest land to store more carbon in the forest and reduce the harvest of biomass.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Connections for Stackable Heavy Timber Modules in Midrise to Tall Wood Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2087
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Zhang, Chao
Lee, George
Lam, Frank
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2019
Format
Report
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Modular
Intra-module Connection
Inter-module Vertical Connection
Inter-module horizontal Connection
Mid-Rise
Tall Wood
Screws
Load Transfer
Steel Angle Bracket
Stiffness
Strength
Ductility
Research Status
Complete
Summary
In Phase I (2018-19) of this project on Prefabricated Heavy Timber Modular Construction, three major types of connections used in a stackable modular building were studied: intramodule connection, inter-module vertical connection, and inter-module horizontal connection. The load requirement and major design criteria were identified...
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Decision-Making for Cross-Laminated Timber Modular Construction Logistics Using Discrete-Event Simulation

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2722
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Site Construction Management
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Abiri, Bahar
Publisher
Oregon State University
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Site Construction Management
Keywords
Modular Construction
Discrete-Event Simulation
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The two primary considerations for construction project management are budget and time management. Modular construction has the potential to improve construction productivity by minimizing time and costs while improving safety and quality. Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) panels are beneficial for modular construction due to the high level of prefabrication, adequate dimensional stability, and good mechanical performance that they provide. Accordingly, CLT modular construction can be a feasible way to speed up the construction and provide affordable housing. However, an in-depth study is needed to streamline the logistics of CLT modular construction supply chain management. CLT modular construction can be performed by two primary means based on type of modules produced: panelized (2D) and volumetric (3D). This research aims to help the Architecture, Engineering, and Construction (AEC) industry by developing a tool to assess the impact of various logistical factors on both panelized and volumetric modular construction productivity. Discrete-Event Simulation (DES) models were developed for panelized and volumetric CLT modular construction based on a hypothetical case study and using data collected from superintendents and project managers. Sensitivity analysis is conducted using the developed models to explore the impact of selected manufacturing and logistical parameters on overall construction efficiency. Comparing volumetric and panelized simulations with the same number of off-site crews revealed that the volumetric model has lower on-site process duration while the off-site process is significantly longer. Accordingly, from manufacturing to the final module assembly, the total time for the volumetric model is longer than panelized model. Moreover, the simulations showed that volumetric modular construction is associated with less personnel cost since the main process is performed off-site, which has lower labor costs and a smaller number of crews required on-site. This framework could be used to identify the optimum construction process for reducing the time and cost of the project and aid in decision-making regarding the scale of modularity to be employed for project.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Deconstructable Hybrid Connections for the Next Generation of Mass Timber Prefabricated Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2551
Topic
Connections
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Connections
Keywords
Deconstructable Connections
Prefabrication
Modular Construction
Reuse
Seismic Resistance
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Cristiano Loss at the University of British Columbia
Summary
This research aims at developing novel multi-material deconstructable hybrid connections for mass timber prefabricated buildings. Connections will be conceived in order to (i) meet multi-objective structural performance, (ii) favour modular construction, (iii) favour quick erection of buildings, (iv) quick disassemble and possible reuse of the timber members, and (v) provide seismic-resistant structural assemblies.
Less detail

Development of Modular Wooden Buildings with Focus on the Indoor Environmental Quality

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue881
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Beikircher, Wilfried
Zingerle, Philipp
Flach, Michael
Year of Publication
2014
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Indoor Air Quality
Indoor Climate
Modular Construction
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
During the last three decades there has been increasing concern within the scientific community about the effects of indoor air quality on health. Changes in building design devised to improve energy efficiency and has induced that modern homes and offices are frequently more airtight than older structures. Furthermore advances in construction technology have caused an extensive use of synthetic building materials. The construction process and the production of building materials not only consume the most energy they also have a big impact on the Global Warming Potential. While these improvements have led to more comfortable buildings with lower running costs, they also provide indoor environments in which contaminants are readily produced and may build up to much higher concentrations than outside. Because about 80-90% of our time is spent indoors, where we are exposed to chemical and biological contaminants and possibly carcinogens, the Indoor Environmental Quality plays an increasing role. The aim of this study was to develop building components out of sustainable natural materials for modular building concepts with regard to the Indoor Environmental Quality such as the air quality and the indoor climate, the temperature and humidity. To guarantee high Indoor Air Quality a mechanical ventilation system is part of the construction. It has to ensure a controlled air change with a minimum of dissipation of energy. Building parts were assembled to meet high energy efficiency Standards. For the construction parts wood, hemp, sheep wool and clay were used to meet the settled requirements. As a first result of this study two modular buildings were erected, in which the indoor air quality and the construction physics will be monitored in the next few years for generating valuable data.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Diaphragmatic Behaviour of Hybrid Cross-Laminated Timber Steel Floors

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1909
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Steel-Timber Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Loss, Cristiano
Gobbi, Filippo
Tannert, Thomas
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Steel-Timber Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Hybrid
Prefabrication
Modular
Load Distribution
Numerical Analysis
Sensitivity Analysis
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 20-23, 2018, Seoul, Republic of Korea
Summary
The diaphragmatic behaviour of floors represents one important requirement for earthquake resistant buildings since diaphragms connect the lateral load resisting systems at each floor level and transfer the seismic forces to them as a function of their in-plane stiffness. This paper presents an innovative hybrid timber-steel solution for floor diaphragms developed by coupling cross-laminated timber panels with cold-formed custom-shaped steel beams. The floor consists of prefabricated repeatable units which are fastened on-site using pre-loaded bolts and self-tapping screws, thus ensuring a fast and efficient installation. An experimentally validated numerical model is used to evaluate the influence of the; i) in-plane floor stiffness; ii) aspect ratio and shape of the building plan; and iii) relative stiffness and disposition of the shear walls, on the load distribution to the shear walls. The load transfer into walls and lateral deformation of the construction system primarily depend on the adopted layouts of shear walls, and for most cases an in-plane stiffness of floors two times larger than that of walls is recommended.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Engineered Timber Structural Frame Components for an Innovative Modular Building System

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2845
Topic
Design and Systems
Connections
Application
Wood Building Systems
Organization
National Renewable Energy Lab
TallWood Design Institute
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Connections
Keywords
Modular Construction
Modularization
Affordable Housing
Prototype
Low-Grade
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Stacey Fritz at Cold Climate Housing Research Center – National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL)
Summary
This project will design, produce, test, and integrate engineered timber products for a modular building system with potential for national applications. The Cold Climate Housing Research Center (CCHRC) in Fairbanks, Alaska, is combining advanced building technologies into a high performance and interoperable kit-of-parts building system called “New Iglu” to meet the increasing demand for affordable, flexible housing solutions. CCHRC is prototyping its innovative New Iglu project, which utilizes vacuum insulated panels, with support from the Department of Energy’s Advanced Building Construction Initiative. With this Wood Innovation Grant, CCHRC will partner with Oregon State University (OSU) and University of Oregon (UO)’s TallWood Design Institute (TDI) to leverage TDI’s specialized research laboratory facilities and expertise in engineered timber, prototyping, and structural engineering. The goals are to prototype modular engineered timber structural frame components for the New Iglu system, demonstrate the commercial viability of low-value timber, and disseminate results to stakeholders. TDI will develop frame components, including reusable structural connections, that integrate with New Iglu and meet current U.S. buildings codes and standards.
Less detail

From file to factory: Innovative design solutions for multi-storey timber buildings applied to project Zembla in Kalmar, Sweden

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3055
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Author
Kaiser, Alex
Larsson, Magnus
Girhammar, Ulf Arne
Organization
Luleå University of Technology
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2019
Format
Journal Article
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Multi-Storey Timber Building
File-to-factory
Modular Systems
Grid Shells
Slotting
Living Capsules
Research Status
Complete
Series
Frontiers of Architectural Research
Summary
A “file-to-factory” process of computer technology is a way to both maximise efficiency throughout the building process, increase a building s performance, and be able to add interesting architectural possibilities throughout the design phase. The authors investigate a novel approach that produces a set of building trajectories rather than a set of buildings, yet yields a series of build-able examples of those trajectories. This paper evaluates how this series of stacked multi-storey timber buildings can be both incorporated within a file-to-factory process, and give rise to creating new innovative solutions throughout the entire design and manufacturing process. This process is applied to a real Swedish project called Zembla. It redefines the notion of sprawl, turning it into a progressive tactics for linking the city fabric to rural areas. It is a post-sustainable file-to-factory-produced timber ground-scraper; soaring above ground and water, suggesting a new way of making city-sized buildings for the future. A plug-in grid-shell structure is designed to contain a minimal amount of timber elements, beams make up the lattice, cross-laminated panels add structural support, surfaces come together to form the living capsules. Having the structure undulate across the topography and touching the ground in as few places as possible uses the dichotomy between landscape and urbanism, bringing the city to the people living in less densified areas. Each living unit is customised to its topological conditions within the grid.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

24 records – page 1 of 3.