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28 records – page 1 of 3.

Against the Grain: Redefining the Living Unit – Advanced Slotting Strategies for Multi-Storey Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue795
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Kaiser, Alex
Larsson, Magnus
Girhammar, Ulf
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Manufacturing
Multi-Storey
CNC
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
Using Charles and Ray Eames’s famous 1950s House of Cards slotting toy as both design metaphor and structural precedent provides the starting point for a novel building logic (utilising three existing Swedish timber systems) that allows volumetrically slotted units to stack inside of and support each other. Contemporary computer-aided fabrication techniques based on evolutionary algorithms and CNC manufacturing strategies are used to produce a methodology for designing a kit-of-parts system at the scale of the skyscraper, based on the slotting together of cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels. A catalogue of novel slotting methods is produced, and a number of alternative slotted joint treatments identified that hold promising potential for further development, parametrically design and control volumes, understand the fabrication workflow and constructional sequence on site, and build prototypes of the chosen slotting configurations at scales ranging between 1:50 and 1:1.
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Bending and Rolling Shear Capacities of Southern Pine Cross Laminated Timber (CLT)

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1596
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Gu, Mengzhe
Pang, Weichiang
Stoner, Michael
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Southern Pine
US
Manufacturing
Rolling Shear
Bending
Three Point Bending Test
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 1899-1906
Summary
Southern Pine (SP) is one of the fastest growing softwood species in the Southern Forest of United States. With its high strength to weight ratio, SP becomes an ideal candidate for manufacturing engineered wood products such as cross laminated timber (CLT). Two batches of CLT panels were manufactured using visually graded SP lumbers in this study: pilot-scale panels in a laboratory setting and full-size panels in a manufacturing plant environment. The first batch of pilot-scale CLT panels was manufactured at Clemson University. The second batch of full-scale CLT panels (3m x 12.2m) was produced and CNC-sized by Structurlam in Penticton, Canada and shipped to Clemson University for testing. Four types of structural wood adhesives were selected in the panel production, namely Melamine Formaldehyde (MF), Phenol Resorcinol Formaldehyde (PRF), Polyurethane (PUR) and Emulsion Polymer Isocyanate (EPI). This paper presents the manufacturing process of SP CLT in a laboratory setting as well as structural performance verification of 3- ply SP CLT in terms of rolling shear and bending properties. The obtained performance data of 3-ply CLT in both major and minor strength directions is verified against PRG-320 Standard for Performance Rated Cross Laminated Timber. Tested results are presented and discussed.
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Bonded Timber-Concrete Composite Floors with Lightweight Concrete

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1699
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Schmid, Volker
Zauft, Doreen
Polak, Maria
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Connections
Keywords
Lightweight Concrete
Epoxy
Adhesives
Manufacturing
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 4360-4367
Summary
This paper examines a new and very promising concept for prefabricated timber-concrete-composite floors (TCC-floors), were the heavy normal weight concrete is replaced by a lightweight concrete (LC) with a density of about 17 kN/m³. Investigations into the connections between lightweight concrete and timber indicate that the performances of the existing connection types are unsatisfactory if combined with lightweight concrete. Therefore, a new connection method is proposed, adhesively bonding the lightweight concrete with the timber by means of a filled epoxy resin. Different ways of manufacturing the bonded timber-lightweight concrete-composite beams (TLCC-beams) are investigated in a research project at the Technische Universität Berlin, to examine the differences in their structural performances. Most promising are the test results for TLLC-beams, fabricated with a wet-in-wet bonding method.
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Building Information Modeling (BIM) and Design for Manufacturing and Assembly (DfMA) for Mass Timber Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1921
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Design and Systems
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Staub-French, Sheryl
Poirier, Erik
Calderon, Francisco
Chikhi, Imen
Zadeh, Puyan
Chudasma, Divyarajsinh
Huang, Shitian
Publisher
BIM TOPiCS Research Lab
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Model
Building Information Modeling
Design for Manufacturing and Assembly
Construction
BIM
DfMA
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The increasing appetite for innovation, performance and sustainability in the Canadian Architecture, Engineering, Construction, Owners and Operators (AECOO) community is leading to the development and deployment of approaches, be they tools, technologies, practices, etc., that are causing a significant shift in the delivery and management of built assets. When deployed...
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Comparison of Sustainability Performance for Cross Laminated Timber and Concrete

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue509
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Piacenza, Joseph
Tumer, Irem
Seyedmahmoudi, Seyedhamed
Haapala, Karl
Hoyle, Christopher
Publisher
ASME
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Life-Cycle Assessment
Social Impact
Sustainability
Reinforced Concrete
Economic Aspect
Manufacturing
Language
English
Conference
International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 4–7, 2013, Portland, Oregon, USA
Summary
As sustainable building design practices become more prevalent in today’s construction market, designers are looking to alternative materials for novel design strategies. This paper presents a case study comparing the sustainability performance of cross laminated timber (CLT) and reinforced concrete. A comparative sustainability assessment of cross laminated timber and concrete, considering economic, environmental, and social aspects was performed. Environmental impact is measured in terms of CO2 equivalent, economic impact is measured with total sector cost (including sector interdependencies), and qualitative metrics were considered for social impact. In order to conduct an accurate performance comparison, a functional unit of building facade volume was chosen for each product. For this paper, several end-of-life strategies were modeled for CLT and concrete facades. To understand environmental, economic, and social impact, three different scenarios were analyzed to compare performance of both CLT and concrete, including cradle to gate product manufacturing, manufacturing with landfill end-of-life, and manufacturing with recycling end-of-life. Environmental LCA was modeled using GaBi 5.0 Education Edition, which includes its own database for elements including materials, processes, and transportation. To compare the economic impact, Carnegie Mellon’s EIO-LCA online tool is used. Finally, social life cycle impact was considered by identifying process attributes of both products that affect the social domain. Based on this analysis, the use of CLT has a significantly lower environmental impact than concrete, however there are additional costs.
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Comparisons of the Production Standards for Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) in Europe versus USA

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1705
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Market and Adoption
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Young, Timothy
Barbu, Marius
Hindman, Daniel
Weissensteiner, Josef
Tudor, Eugenia
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Market and Adoption
Keywords
Europe
North America
Manufacturing
Standards
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 4412-4419
Summary
Cross laminated timber (CLT) is a new engineered wood product that has experienced rapid growth and market acceptance for residential and non-residential construction in western and central Europe. Potential exists for rapid market adoption in North America if manufacturing capacities are developed. Dissemination of information on CLT North America markets, manufacturing capabilities, and product standards are the next key steps for facilitating investment in CLT manufacturing capacities in North America. This paper compares standards for CLT between Europe and North America.
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Composite Cross Laminated Timber (CCLT) Made with Engineered Wood Products (EWP) and Hardwood

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1578
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Design and Systems
Cost
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Author
Grandmont, Jean-Frédéric
Wang, Brad
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Topic
Design and Systems
Cost
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Dimensional Stability
SPF
Birch
Aspen
Maple
Equilibrium Moisture Content
Delamination
Bond Line
Manufacturing
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 1723-1730
Summary
North American cross laminated timber is currently made of softwood lumber following the guidelines of the ANSI/APA PRG-320 manufacturing standard. In this study, the potential of manufacturing CLT panels using various hardwood species and engineered wood products (EWP) was investigated for their compatibility and the impact on the dimensional stability and aesthetics of the end products. Yellow birch, trembling aspen, sugar maple, laminated strand lumber (LSL) and laminated veneer lumber (LVL) were compared to 100% spruce-pine-fir group species (SPF) lumber made CLT panel. The bond line performance of the assemblies was tested as well as the dimensional stability and appearance of the panels when subjected to conditions with equilibrium moisture contents (EMC) of 4.5%, 12% and 16%. Results showed that higher density hardwood species were prone to delamination. LSL, LVL and trembling aspen yielded promising delamination results. Best overall dimensional stability results were achieved with EWP inclusive configurations. Aesthetic integrity assessment showed that the use of hardwood for the core layer and edge gluing of softwood outer layers had a negative impact. Overall, the study showed a great potential for manufacturing future composite CLT (CCLT) products using EWP and low density hardwood species. The cost premium of using these alternative materials would need to be offset by valuable sets of properties or by a reduction of the manufacturing cost.
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Cross-Laminated Secondary Timber: Experimental Testing and Modelling the Effect of Defects and Reduced Feedstock Properties

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2104
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Environmental Impact
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)

Damage Problems in Glued Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue165
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Serviceability
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Author
Vanya, Csilla
Year of Publication
2012
Country of Publication
Poland
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Serviceability
Keywords
Construction
Damage
Delamination
Loads
Manufacturing
Service Life
Stress
Tension
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Drewno
Summary
On a number of occasions glued laminated timber breaks apart before the end of their service life. Examples in Germany (Frese M., Blaß H. J. [2011]) and Denmark (Hansson, Larsen [2005] ) show that this problem is real. In order to find the causes of the problem, extensive tests were conducted: 16 buildings with glued laminated timber were examined on the spot, calculations and laboratory work were carried out. These examinations told us that not only did the properties of the wooden material cause the damage, but the problems were also due to the wood used and the method of construction. In the calculations, the external load and residual stresses occurring in the glued laminated timber were included. Residual tensions in this timber were generated by climatic stresses and also due to the method of construction. These stresses also accumulated along with the stresses of the external load. Laboratory work was carried out to measure the delamination. We examined whether these analyses and calculations prove or disprove the results of the on- the- spot examinations.
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Development of Adhesive Free Engineered Wood Products - Towards Adhesive Free Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2029
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Environmental Impact
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)

28 records – page 1 of 3.