Skip header and navigation

Refine Results By

87 records – page 1 of 9.

Adhesive Bonding of Timber and Glass in Load-Bearing Facades - Evaluation of the Ageing Behaviour

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1742
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Serviceability
Material
Timber-Glass Composite
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Nicklisch, Felix
Weller, Bernhard
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Timber-Glass Composite
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Connections
Serviceability
Keywords
Adhesives
Façade
Load Bearing
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 4913-4920
Summary
Wooden constructions are on the rise again – encouraged by a strong trend towards sustainable and resource efficient buildings. Load-bearing timber-glass composite elements – a novel concept to use the in-plane loadbearing potential of glass – could contribute to a more efficient use of materials in façades. The current study relates to the adhesive bond between the glass pane and the timber substructure. The applicability of structural sealants such as silicones is limited due to their distinct flexibility which leads to large deformations of the joint. Further potential arises from the use of adhesives of medium and high stiffness. Their general performance as well as their durability have not yet been evaluated with respect to the proposed use in building constructions. This paper draws attention to the ageing stability of two promising adhesives. Small-scale adhesively bonded specimens which are composed of a wooden and a glass piece are exposed to different ageing scenarios which relate to the impacts typically encountered in façades. Based on the results it can be concluded that the considered high-modules adhesives enable an increase of characteristic failure loads and a reduction of joint deformation, but also reveal shortcomings regarding their ageing stability.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

An Analytical, Numerical and Experimental Study of Non-Metallic Mechanical Joints for Engineered Timber Constructions

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1606
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Author
Bazu, Gheorghe
Mahjourian Namari, Siavash
Wehsener, Jörg
Hartig, Jens
Haller, Peer
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Conference Paper
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
GFRP
Densified Veneer Wood
Plates
Dowels
Load Bearing Behaviour
Analytical Model
Numerical Model
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 2059-2068
Summary
Timber structures are strongly depending on the design of connections, which are mostly constructed from steel components. However, these joints have a number of limitations such as the tendency to be heavy, proneness to corrosion and often poor aesthetic appearances. Therefore, this study aims to replace metallic joints by non-metallic materials. An experimental testing program was performed to investigate the use of glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP), densified veneer wood (DVW) and laminated veneer lumber (LVL) in the form of plates and dowels in different test configurations. Analytical and numerical models were developed to better understand the load-bearing behaviour and to perform static verifications. The models were validated based on the experimental results. The results demonstrate that the use of GFRP dowels in combination with GFRP plates can provide a robust connection system for contemporary applications.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Behaviours of Larch Glued Laminated Timber Beams Exposed to Standard Fire Heating During the Cooling Phase Study on Fire Performance of Structural Glued Laminated Timber Beams Part 1

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1112
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Fire
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Author
Kanjo, Hinjin
Hidemasa, Yusa
Horio, Takehito
Hirashima, Takeo
Takumi, Matsumoto
Saito, Kiyoshi
Publisher
J-STAGE
Year of Publication
2015
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Larch
Load Bearing Capacity
Charring Rate
Cooling
Research Status
Complete
Series
Architectural Institute of Japan Structural System
Summary
Timber elements, which are different from other structural elements, have a characteristic problem in that the load bearing capacity decreases due to self-burning in the case of a fire, and this self-burning may continue after other fuel in the room has been exhausted. Therefore, the structural fire performance of timber elements should be clarified during not only the heating phase, but also the cooling phase. However, in examining the load bearing capacity of timber elements in a fire, few studies have considered the cooling phase. In the present paper, the fire performance of glued, laminated timber beams is discussed based on load-bearing fire tests that take the cooling phase into consideration.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Bending Tests on Glued Laminated Timber Beams with Well-Known Material Properties

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue186
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Author
Fink, Gerhard
Kohler, Jochen
Frangi, Andrea
Organization
ETH Zurich
Year of Publication
2013
Format
Report
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Bending Strength
Failure
Load Bearing Capacity
Four Point Bending Test
Density
Model
Bending Stiffness
Research Status
Complete
Summary
At the Institute of Structural Engineering at the ETH Zurich numerous of investigations are conducted to analyse the load bearing capacity of glued laminated timber beams. The investigations are part of the research project ’Influence of varying material properties on the load bearing capacity of glued laminated timber (glulam)’. The investigations are taking place on 24 glulam beams with well-known material properties. The glulam beams are fabricated out of 400 timber boards. From those boards the material properties are investigated non-destructively within a former research project. During the glulam fabrication it is particularly focused to keep the information of the timber boards; i.e. after the glulam fabrication the position of each particular timber board within the glulam beam and thus the position of each particular knot is still known. The glulam beams are investigated during a 4-point bending test. On the glulam members the load bearing capacity, the bending stiffness and the density is measured. Furthermore local strains within the glulam beams are investigated using an optical coordinate-measurement device. Following the test the failure is investigated in detail. Hereby the type of failure (knot cluster, finger joint, clear wood) and the amount of failure (number of damaged lamellas) is documented. Afterwards the failed glulam beams are loaded again to analyse the remaining bending strength and the corresponding remaining bending stiffness. The major aim of the experimental analysis is the investigation of the load bearing capacity of glulam beams with well-known local material properties. The gained results can be used for an investigation of the influence of local weak zones, such as knot clusters or finger joints, on the load bearing capacity of glulam. In addition a data basis is produced to develop a new model (or to evaluate existing models) for the estimation of the load bearing capacity of glulam.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Bending Tests with Glulam Columns under Eccentric Normal Force Stress

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1138
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Author
Frangi, Andrea
Theiler, Matthias
Organization
ETH Zurich
Year of Publication
2015
Format
Thesis
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Load Bearing Capacity
Axial Compression
Buckling Tests
Spruce
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The force-displacement behaviour of structural timber members subjected to axial compression or combined axial compression and bending is distinctively non-linear. This behaviour is caused by the non-linear increase of the deformation due to the increasing eccentricity of the axial load as well as by the non-linear material behaviour of timber when subjected to compression. The present report describes experimental investigations on glued laminated timber members subjected to eccentric compression. The aim of these experimental investigations was to create a data base, which can be used to validate theoretical calculation models and to assess the accurateness of the design approaches given in the design codes for timber structures. The specimens for the main bunch of experiments were produced using lamellas made of Norway spruce grown in Switzerland. For this purpose, a total of 336 lamellas were available. In the first step, non-destructive tests on the lamellas were performed. These tests aimed at the collection of data in order to characterise the raw material. In the second step, the lamellas were strength graded. The aim of the grading process was to select two classes of lamellas for the production of the test specimens. The lamellas were selected so that they were suitable to produce glued laminated timber of strength classes GL24h and GL32h. Within the grading process, visual grading criteria as well as machine grading criteria were used. In the third step, the graded lamellas were used to produce glued laminated timber members. Five tests series were produced. Each of the test series consisted of ten specimens. Three series were made of glued laminated timber GL24h and two series were made of glued laminated timber GL32h. The length of the timber members was varied between the different test series. The lengths were L = 1’400 mm, L = 2’300 mm and L = 3’200 mm respectively. During the production, the setup of the test specimens was recorded. Hence, the position and the orientation of every lamella within the test specimen were documented. Additionally, some non-destructive tests were performed using the test specimens. In the last step, the glued laminated timber members were subjected to buckling tests. The test specimens were loaded with an eccentric compression force up to failure. During the tests, different measurements were carried out in order to document the experimental investigations as accurate as possible. Amongst others, the applied loads as well as horizontal and vertical deformations were recorded. For a subsample of 20 test specimens, additional local deformation measurements were performed using an optical measurement device.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Building Climate – Long-Term Measurements to Determine the Effect on the Moisture Gradient in Timber Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue266
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Serviceability
Moisture
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Gamper, Andreas
Dietsch, Philipp
Merk, Michael
Organization
Technical University of Munich
Year of Publication
2014
Format
Report
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Serviceability
Moisture
Keywords
Moisture Gradients
Climate
Load Carrying
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Through long-term measurements of climate data (temperature, relative humidity) and timber moisture content on large-span timber structures in buildings of typical construction type and use, data sets were generated which deliver information on the sequence and magnitude of seasonal variations. The measurement of moisture in different depths of the cross-section is of particular interest to draw conclusions on the size and speed of adjustment of the moisture distribution to changing climatic conditions. The moisture gradient has direct influence on the size of the internal stresses and possible damage potential. Similarly, the results provide a review and extension of the previous classification of buildings into use classes. They allow for a more precise indication of range of resulting equilibrium moisture content for the specific use, enabling the installation of timber elements with adjusted moisture content. The results of the research project also support the development of appropriate monitoring systems, which could be used in the form of early warning systems based on climate measurements
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Buildings Made of Dowel-Laminated Timber: Joint and Shear Wall Properties

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1718
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Connections
Material
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Sandhaas, Carmen
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Conference Paper
Material
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Connections
Keywords
Joints
Load Carrying Capacity
Cyclic Tests
Energy Dissipation
Behaviour Factors
Numerical Models
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 4589-4596
Summary
Dowel-laminated timber (DLT) elements consist of lamellae arranged side-by-side that are connected with beech dowels. Due to the glue-free DLT element layup, joints and shear walls potentially suffer from considerable reduction of stiffness and load carrying capacity as metal fasteners inserted perpendicular to the element plane may be placed in gaps between the single lamellae. Tests on typical joints showed that, depending on the fastener diameter, the remaining load carrying capacity of joints in DLT in comparison to joints in solid wood may be only 25%. Tests on DLT shear walls with different sheeting proved that the use of DLT structures as shear walls is only possible if at least one-sided sheeting is used. Cyclic tests on DLT shear walls demonstrated that the DLT construction typology has energy dissipation properties similar to traditional timber frame construction. Analogously, preliminary behaviour factors for DLT buildings evaluated with numerical models were also similar to those for timber frame buildings.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Chapter 6: Fire Damage of Wood Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue897
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Fire
Mechanical Properties
Material
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Author
Kukay, Brian
White, Robert
Woeste, Frank
Publisher
International Code Council
Year of Publication
2012
Format
Book/Guide
Material
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Topic
Fire
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Bending Tests
Withdrawal Tests
Load Bearing Capacity
Charring
Reduced Cross Section Method
Research Status
Complete
Series
Inspection, Testing, and Monitoring of Buildings and Bridges
Summary
Depending on the severity, fire damage can compromise the structural integrity of wood structures such as buildings or residences. Fire damage of wood structures can incorporate several models that address (1) the type, cause, and spread of the fire, (2) the thermal gradients and fire-resistance ratings, and (3) the residual load capacity. The investigator should employ engineering judgment to identify those in-service members that are to be replaced, repaired, or can remain in-service as they are. Suchjudgment will likely be based on the visual inspection of damaged members, connections, and any protective membranes.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

CLT-Lightweight Concrete Composite Beam with Adhesive Connection

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1701
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Author
Kanócz, Ján
Bajzecerová, Viktória
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Adhesives
Lightweight Concrete
Deformation
Vibration
Load Carrying Capacity
Shear
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 4378-4385
Summary
In the presented paper, results of theoretical and experimental investigation of timber-concrete composite members with adhesive connection are described. For the timber part of composite beams Cross Laminated Timber and for concrete part lightweight concrete was used. For the composite connection special adhesive to bounding wet concrete and timber was applied. For experimental investigation two types of composite beams with different dimensions was used. Due to the shrinkage of lightweight concrete small precamber of timber beams during concrete hardening was applied. CLT panels combined with concrete slab dispose of higher load-carrying capacity, lower deformation and vibration. In case of theoretical analysis, simplified analytical -method was used to consider shear flexibility of the CLT cross layer. Results of presented experimental and theoretical analysis provide wider scope for further research and application of adhesively bonded CLT-concrete composite members.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Comparison of Verification and Reinforcement Concepts for Timber Beams with Large Round Holes

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1714
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Author
Dröscher, Julia
Augustin, Manfred
Schickhofer, Gerhard
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Reinforcement
Shear Stresses
Tensile Stresses
Load Carrying Capacity
Numerical Investigation
Analytical Investigation
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 4529-4538
Summary
Within this paper a comparison of different reinforcement concepts for timber beams with round holes is carried out. Therefore currently applied standardized methods and two recently developed approaches are considered. By means of numerical and analytical investigations it becomes apparent that the analysed reinforcement methods divergent to those given in current standards have great potential: shear stresses as well as tensile stresses perpendicular to the grain in the critical areas around the beam opening can be reduced significantly. Hence, the maximum load carrying capacities of the new reinforcement concepts supposedly exceed the standardized ones considerably. For verification of the results experimental investigations on beams with different reinforcement methods are planned.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

87 records – page 1 of 9.