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6 records – page 1 of 1.

Comparison of the Seismic Performance of Different Hybrid Timber-Steel Frame Configurations

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1775
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Shear Walls
Author
Marin, Jose Alberto
He, Minjuan
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Conference Paper
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Shear Walls
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Finite Element Model
Timber-Steel Hybrid
Deformation
Lateral Loading
Abaqus
Displacement
Inter-Story Drift
Diaphragm
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 5401-5408
Summary
This paper presents a finite element modeling case study of three different designs of hybrid timber-steel 6-story buildings. One of the buildings is composed by steel frames and timber diaphragms while the other two cases consist of the initial design with timber shear walls added in different dispositions, one with outer walls and the other...
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Earthquake Damage Reduction in Timber Frame Houses Using Small-Size Fluid Damper

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2975
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Seismic
Application
Frames
Author
Nakamura, Yutaka
Fujii, Hinako
Organization
Shimane University
Editor
Raheem, Shehata
Publisher
Frontiers
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Application
Frames
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Earthquake Damage
Timber Frame House
Fluid Damper
Response Analysis
Inter-Story Drift
Wall Ratio
Research Status
Complete
Series
Frontiers in Built Environment
Summary
Timber frame structures are common traditional methods of housing construction, which use squared-off timber beams, columns, and walls as lateral load-bearing members. The seismic performance of timber frame houses can be secured by the load-bearing capacity of erected braces and walls; however, past major earthquakes have caused severe damage to earthquake-resistant timber frame houses. This study investigates the effect of small-size fluid dampers on the earthquake damage reduction in a timber frame house through earthquake response analyses. A detailed analytical model was generated based on an actual two-story timber frame house, which was designed for the highest seismic grade using the latest Japanese standards. Time-history response analyses were carried out for the analytical model subjected to the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake with and without small-size fluid dampers. The small-size fluid damper is equipped with a relief mechanism for the damping force, and its damping property can be expressed using the Maxwell model. Four or seven fluid dampers were installed in the first story of the model to investigate their effect on the earthquake damage reduction. The results of the earthquake response analyses show that the four and seven fluid dampers can reduce the maximum first-story drift angle by approximately one-third and half, respectively. The dampers suppress the residual deformation, control the elongation of the fundamental period during the response, and restrain the amplitude growth. A small-size fluid damper has an equivalent quake resistance to a conventional structural wall with a wall ratio of 3 plus.
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Feasibility Study of Tall Concrete-Timber Hybrid System

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1274
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Seismic
Wind
Design and Systems
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Kaushik, Kuldeep
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2017
Format
Thesis
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Wind
Design and Systems
Keywords
Lateral Loads
Gravity Loads
Timber-Concrete Hybrid
Inter-Story Drift
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Although wood is widely used as a construction material, it is mostly limited to low and mid-rise residential construction, partially due to fire code restrictions. This limitation can be overcome by considering hybrid systems which combine wood with non-combustible materials. This research presents an innovative wood-concrete hybrid system, suitable for tall buildings, where a concrete frame with slabs at every third story provides fire separation as well as stiffness and strength to resist gravity and lateral loads. The intermediate stories including their floors are constructed using light-frame wood modules. This approach reduces the environmental footprint of the building, reduces the building weight and therefore the seismic demand on connections and foundation, and speeds up the construction process. For a novel system, numerical modeling is crucial to predicting its structural response to static and dynamic loading. This thesis studies the structural feasibility of the system by developing finite element models and assessing the structural behavior at the component and system levels when subjected to earthquake and wind loads. Nonlinear analyses are performed considering material and geometric nonlinearity using multiple ground motions to estimate the structure’s inter-story drift and base shear. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed wood-concrete hybrid system for tall buildings in high seismic zones.
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Higher Mode Effects in Multi-Storey Timber Buildings with Varying Diaphragm Flexibility

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1480
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Walls
Author
Moroder, Daniel
Sarti, Francesco
Pampanin, Stefano
Smith, Tobias
Buchanan, Andrew
Year of Publication
2017
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Walls
Topic
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Nonlinear Time History Analysis
Higher Mode Effects
Stiffness
Diaphragms
Inter-Story Drift
Conference
New Zealand Society for Earthquake Engineering Conference
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 27-29, 2017, Wellington, New Zealand
Summary
With the increasing acceptance and popularity of multi-storey timber buildings up to 10 storeys and beyond, the influence of higher mode effects and diaphragm stiffness cannot be overlooked in design. Due to the lower stiffness of timber lateral load resisting systems compared with traditional construction materials, the effect of higher modes on the global dynamic behaviour can be more critical. The presence of flexible timber diaphragms creates additional vibration modes, which have the potential to interact with each other, increasing the seismic demand on the whole structure. This paper uses a parametric non-linear time-history analysis on a series of timber frame and wall structures with varying diaphragm flexibility to study their dynamic behaviour and to determine diaphragm forces. The analyses results showed that although higher mode effects play a significant role in the structural dynamic response, this increased demand can be successfully predicted with methods available in literature. The parametric analyses showed that the diaphragm flexibility did not significantly increase the shear and moment demand; however, stiff wall structures with flexible diaphragms experienced large inter-storey drifts measured at diaphragm midspan compared with the drift of the wall alone. As expected, the diaphragm forces observed from the time-history analyses were significantly higher than the forces derived from an equivalent static analysis, leading to a potentially unsafe design. The paper presents a simplified approach for evaluating these amplified peak inertial diaphragm forces.
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Parametric analyses and feasibility study of moment-resisting timber frames under service load

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3023
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Application
Frames
Author
Vilguts, Aivars
Stamatopoulos, Haris
Malo, Kjell Arne
Organization
Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Application
Frames
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Moment-resisting Timber Frame
Serviceability
Acceleration
Lateral Displacement
Inter-Story Drift
Fundamental Eigen-frequency
Mode Shape
Research Status
Complete
Series
Engineering Structures
Summary
Over the last decades, the increasing urbanization and environmental challenges have created a demand for mid-rise and high-rise timber buildings in modern cities. The major challenge for mid-rise and high-rise timber buildings typically is the fulfillment of the serviceability requirements, especially limitation with respect to the wind-induced displacements and accelerations. The purpose of the present paper is to evaluate the feasibility and the limitations of moment-resisting timber frames under service load according to the present regulations. The parametric analyses investigate the effects of the rotational stiffness of beam-to-column and column-to-foundation connections, storey number and height, number and length of bays, column cross-section dimensions and spacing between frames on the overall serviceability performance of the frames. Elastic and modal analysis were carried out for a total of 17,800 planar moment-resisting timber frames with different parameters by use of Abaqus Finite Element (abbr. FE) software. Finally, the obtained results were used to derive simple expressions for the lateral displacement, maximum inter-story drift, fundamental eigen-frequency, mode shapes and acceleration.
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Performance Evaluation of Multi-Storey Cross-Laminated Timber Structures Under Different Earthquake Hazard Levels

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1384
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Author
Sun, Xiaofeng
He, Minjuan
Li, Zheng
Shu, Zhan
Publisher
Springer Japan
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Equivalent Static Force Procedure
Multi-Storey
Seismic Performance
Lateral Load Resisting System
Inter-Story Drift
Pinching4 Model
Numerical Model
Probability of Non-Exceedance
Empirical Cumulative Distribution Functions
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Wood Science
Summary
The inter-storey drift limitations are meaningful reference values for structural seismic performance evaluation. This paper presents an analytical investigation into the seismic performance of multi-storey cross-laminated timber (CLT) structures to obtain the drift limitations under different earthquake hazard levels reasonably. The Pinching4 model was used to simulate the nonlinear mechanical behavior of three types of connections used in CLT structures, and a numerical model was further developed to capture the lateral load-resisting properties of CLT shear walls. Moreover, three benchmark multi-storey CLT apartment buildings were designed using the Equivalent Static Force Procedure according to National Building Code of Canada (NBCC), and simplified structural models were developed for these buildings. Depending on the results from numerous time-history dynamic analyses, the empirical cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) of the maximum inter-storey drifts were constructed for the three benchmark buildings. The probability of non-exceedance (PNE) of inter-storey drift thresholds under different earthquake hazard levels was proposed and validated. It is recommended that for low-rise CLT buildings within three stories, values of 0.30%, 0.75%, and 1.40% can be considered as the drift limitations for frequent, medium, and rare seismic hazard levels, respectively. For mid-rise or high-rise buildings without three stories, 0.25%, 0.70%, and 1.30% can be considered as drift limitations.
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6 records – page 1 of 1.