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An Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from CLT and Glulam in Two Residential Nearly Zero Energy Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2441
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Lolli, Nicola
Fufa, Selamawit Mamo
Wiik, Marianne Kjendseth
Publisher
Taylor&Francis Online
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
United Kingdom
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
GHG
Greenhouse gas emissions
Tall Wood
Concrete
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Wood Material Science & Engineering
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Cradle-to-Gate Life-Cycle Assessment of a Glued-Laminated Wood Product from Quebec's Boreal Forest

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2555
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Author
Laurent, Achille
Gaboury, Simon
Wells, Jean-Robert
Bonfils, Sibi
Boucher, Jean-François
Sylvie, Bouchard
D'Amours, Sophie
Villeneuve, Claude
Publisher
Forest Products Society
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
LCA
Cradle-to-Gate
Sustainability
Greenhouse gas emissions
Carbon Footprint
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Forest Products Journal
Summary
The building sector is increasingly identified as being energy and carbon intensive. Although the majority of emissions are linked to energy usage during the operation part of a building's life cycle, choice of construction materials could play a significant role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and other environmental end-point damages. Increasing the use of wood products in buildings may contribute to the solution, but their environmental impacts are difficult to assess and quantify because they depend on a variety of uncertain parameters. The present cradle-to-gate life-cycle analysis (LCA) focuses exclusively on a glued-laminated wood product (glulam) produced from North American boreal forests located in the province of Quebec, Canada. This study uses primary data to quantify the environmental impacts of all necessary stages of products' life cycle, from harvesting the primary resources, to manufacturing the transformed product into glulam. The functional unit is 1 m3 of glulam. This is the first study based on primary data pertaining to Quebec's boreal forest. Quebec's boreal glulam manufacturing was compared with two other LCAs on glulam in Europe and the United States. Our results show that Quebec's glulam has a significantly smaller environmental footprint than what is reported in the literature. From an LCA perspective, there is a significant advantage to producing glulam in Quebec, compared with the European and American contexts. The same holds true in regard to the four end-point damage categories.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Dynamic Life Cycle Carbon and Energy Analysis for Cross-Laminated Timber in the Southeastern United States

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2688
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Energy Performance
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Lan, Kai
Kelley, Stephen
Nepal, Prakash
Yao, Yuan
Publisher
IOP Publishing Ltd
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Energy Performance
Keywords
Life-Cycle Assessment
LCA
Dynamic
Carbon Analysis
Greenhouse gas emissions
Energy Consumption
Cradle-to-Grave
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Environmental Research Letters
Summary
Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) has been used to understand the carbon and energy implications of manufacturing and using cross-laminated timber (CLT), an emerging and sustainable alternative to concrete and steel. However, previous LCAs of CLT are static analyses without considering the complex interactions between the CLT manufacturing and forest systems, which are dynamic and largely affected by the variations in forest management, CLT manufacturing, and end-of-life options. This study fills this gap by developing a dynamic life-cycle modeling framework for a cradle-to-grave CLT manufacturing system across 100 years in the Southeastern United States. The framework integrates process-based simulations of CLT manufacturing and forest growth as well as Monte Carlo simulation to address uncertainty. On 1-ha forest land basis, the net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions ranges from -954 to -1445 metric tonne CO2 eq. for a high forest productivity scenario compared to -609 to -919 for a low forest productivity scenario. All scenarios showed significant GHG emissions from forest residues decay, demonstrating the strong need to consider forest management and their dynamic impacts in LCAs of CLT or other durable wood products (DWP). The results show that using mill residues for energy recovery has lower fossil-based GHG (59%–61% reduction) than selling residues for producing DWP, but increases the net GHG emissions due to the instantaneous release of biogenic carbon in residues. In addition, the results were converted to 1 m3 basis with a cradle-to-gate system boundary to be compared with literature. The results, 113–375 kg CO2 eq./m3 across all scenarios, were consistent with previous studies. Those findings highlight the needs of system-level management to maximize the potential benefits of CLT. This work is an attributional LCA, but the presented results lay a foundation for future consequential LCAs for specific CLT buildings or commercial forest management systems.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Environmental and Economic Evaluation of Small-Scale Bridge Repair Using Cross-Laminated Timber Floor Slabs

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2397
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Bridges and Spans

Seeing the Forest and the Trees: Environmental Impacts of Cross-Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2702
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Kwok, Alison
Zalusky, Hannah
Rivera, Maria Isabel
Rasmussen, Linsday
McKay, Hannah
Publisher
Taylor&Francis Online
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Greenhouse gas emissions
Embodied Carbon
Embodied Energy
Life Cycle
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Technology
Architecture + Design
Summary
With advances in wood product development and building code acceptance, mass timber structural systems have become viable alternatives to steel and concrete structural systems (Post 2015). These mass timber systems have environmental benefits, such as carbon sequestration ability and lower greenhouse gas emissions than steel and concrete systems. How can mass timber materials such as cross-laminated timber (CLT) reduce the environmental impacts of buildings, and how certain is this reduction? In order to truly answer this question, environmental impact assessments of CLT and other wood materials must first address variation and uncertainty in forest management and biogenic carbon accounting.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail