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9 records – page 1 of 1.

Analysis of Glue Line and Correlations Between Anatomical Characteristics of Eucalyptus grandis × Eucalyptus urophylla Glued-Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2435
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Bending and Bonding Properties of Mixed-Species Glued Laminated Timber from Merpauh, Jelutong and Sesendok

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2434
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Wood Building Systems

Bonding Strength Test Method Assessment for Cross-Laminated Timber Derived Stressed-Skin Panels (CLT SSP)

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1404
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Luengo, Emilio
Hermoso, Eva
Cabrero, Juan Carlos
Arriaga, Francisco
Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Netherlands
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Stressed-Skin Panels
Shear Strength
Glue Lines
Shear Tests
Bending Tests
Bonding
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Materials and Structures
ISSN
1871-6873
Summary
Different methods, including bending tests and small and medium size shear tests, were used to assess the skin to stringer glue line shear strength of Radiata Pine Cross-Laminated Timber Derived Stressed-Skin Panels (CLT SSP). Bending test shear strengths were estimated using the mechanically jointed beam theory (gamma method) for CrossLaminated Timber (CLT) panels with modifications in the layers’ effective widths, and then compared with results from the small and medium size shear tests. Small and medium size shear tests proved to be possible methods for assessing bonding strength for factory production control. The small shear tests provided lower strength values and higher scatter results than those gathered from the medium size tests. The mean shear strength results obtained from bending tests were inferior to the values obtained from the small and medium size specimens. The bending tests proved necessary for assessing the mechanical behaviour of CLT SSP.
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Comparison of Test Methods for the Determination of Delamination in Glued Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2428
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Effect of Glue-line Thickness on Pull-Out Behavior of Glued-in GFRP Rods in LVL: Finite Element Analysis

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1331
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Author
Madhoushi, Mehrab
Ansell, Martin
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Netherlands
Format
Journal Article
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Finite Element Analysis
Glue-line Thickness
Pull-Out Behavior
Modulus of Elasticity
Glued-In Rods
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Polymer Testing
Summary
This paper uses finite element analysis (FEA) to verify the results of previous experimental works conducted on the effect of glue-line thickness and rate of loading on pull-out behavior of glued-in GFRP rods in LVL. For this purpose, the materials were considered as orthotropic for the timber and the GFRP rod, and isotropic for epoxy resin. To determine the effects of thickness on pull-out, four glue-lines namely 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 mm were modelled. To examine the effects of rate of loading, three glue-lines 0.5, 2 and 4 mm were modelled with different values of modulus of elasticity selected for the resin to simulate higher and lower rates of loading. Results showed that with an increasing thickness of glue-line, the concentration of Z-direction stresses declines across the glue-line thickness from the rod-adhesive interface towards the adhesive-timber interface and the magnitude of shear stresses, tXZ, increases to a maximum within the glue-line in a zone about 20e30% into the resin layer and this is seen for all glueline thicknesses. Also, by changing values of elastic modulus for the resin in the FE model to simulate rate of loading, it was shown that thicker glue-lines are more sensitive to loading rate
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Effect of Laminated Structure Design on the Mechanical Properties of Bamboo-Wood Hybrid Laminated Veneer Lumber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1407
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Other Materials
Author
Chen, Fuming
Deng, Jianchao
Li, Xingjun
Wang, Ge
Smith, Lee
Shi, Sheldon
Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Germany
Format
Journal Article
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Other Materials
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Keywords
Bamboo
Poplar
Analytical Model
Density
MOE
MOR
Shear Strength
Glue Lines
Loading Tests
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
European Journal of Wood and Wood Products
ISSN
1436-736X
Summary
The effects of veneer orientation and loading direction on the mechanical properties of bamboo-bundle/poplar veneer laminated veneer lumber (BWLVL) were investigated by a statistical analysis method. Eight types of laminated structure were designed for the BWLVL aiming to explore the feasibility of manufacturing high-performance bamboo-based composites. A specific type of bamboo species named Cizhu bamboo (Neosinocalamus affinis) with a thickness of 6 mm and diameter of 65 mm was used. The wood veneers were from fast-growing poplar tree (Populus ussuriensis Kom.) in China. The bamboo bundles were obtained by a mechanical process. They were then formed into uniform veneers using a onepiece veneer technology. Bamboo bundle and poplar veneer were immersed in water-soluble phenol formaldehyde (PF) resin with low molecular weight for 7 min and dried to MC of 8–12 % under the ambient environment. All specimens were prepared through hand lay-up using compressing molding method. The density and mechanical properties including modulus of elasticity (MOE), modulus of rupture (MOR), and shearing strength (SS) of samples were characterized under loading parallel and perpendicular to the glue line. The results indicated that as the contribution of bamboo bundle increased in laminated structure, especially laminated on the surface layers, the MOE, MOR and SS increased. A lay-up BBPBPBB (Bbamboo, P-poplar) had the highest properties due to the cooperation of bamboo bundle and poplar veneer. A higher value of MOE and MOR was found for the perpendicular loading test than that for the parallel test, while a slightly higher SS was observed parallel to the glue line compared with perpendicular loading. Any lay-up within the homogeneous group can be used to replace others for obtaining the same mechanical properties in applications. These findings suggested that the laminated structure with high stiffness laid-up on the surface layers could improve the performance of natural fiber reinforced composites.
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Influence of the Treatment Phase on the Gluing Performance of Glued Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2578
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)

Structural Safety and Rehabilitation of Connections in Wide-Span Timber Structures - Two Exemplary Truss Systems

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1485
Year of Publication
2008
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Bridges and Spans
Author
Dietsch, Philipp
Merk, Michael
Mestek, Peter
Winter, Stefan
Organization
Technical University of Munich
Year of Publication
2008
Country of Publication
Germany
Format
Report
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Bridges and Spans
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Failure Mechanisms
Wide-Span
Cracks
Glue Lines
Strength
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Following the Bad Reichenhall ice-arena collapse, numerous expertises on the structural safety of wide-span timber structures were carried out at the Chair of Timber Structures and Building Construction. It became evident that inadequate structural design and detailing as well as inadequate manufacturing principles were the main reasons for observed failures. The design and manufacture of connections in wide-span timber structures are still amongst the most challenging tasks for both the structural engineer as well as the executing company. This paper will, on the basis of two exemplary expertises, discuss specific issues in the structural reliability of connections in wide-span timber trusses and give recommendations towards a state-of-the art design of such connections.
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Study of Massive Timber Walls based on NLT and Post Laminated LVL

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1585
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Zhang, Chao
Lee, George
Lam, Frank
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Shear Tests
Glue Lines
Lateral Loading
Sheathing
Load Carrying Capacity
Stiffness
Energy Dissipation
Shear Strength
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Currently the massive timber shear walls are mainly made from Cross Laminated Timber (CLT), which possesses a high in-plane shear strength and rigidity. But only part of its elements (mainly the vertically aligned laminae) are engaged in carrying the vertical load and that could be a limitation when designing taller timber structures or wherever higher vertical load is present. This project studied alternative solutions to massive timber shear wall system, based on Nailed Laminated Timber (NLT) and post laminated LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber). The test was conducted on three levels: shear test on glue/nail line, bending-shear test on a small element, and full size wall test under lateral loading. The former two tests investigated the properties of basic elements in NLT and post laminated LVL. The results were used to design and predict the performance of full size shear walls. The NLT walls were tested under two conditions: without sheathing and with plywood sheathing. The wall without sheathing had the lowest load-carrying capacity and lowest stiffness. Adding plywood sheathing significantly increased its strength and stiffness. The failure in the wall with sheathing was at the sheathing connections, in the forms of nail withdrawal, nail head pull through, and nail breakage. The NLT wall with sheathing had a peak load up to 60% higher than the comparable light wood frame wall, also with a higher stiffness and better ductility. NLT shear walls have an internal energy dissipating capacity which CLT and post laminated LVL walls lack. The post laminated LVL walls behaved as a rigid plate under lateral loading, with little internal deformation. The failure occurred at the holdowns not within the wall. The size effect of its shear strength was studied and an equation was developed to calculate the shear strength of a large size wall plate. Both products have efficient vertical load bearing mechanism by arranging all elements in the vertical direction. They may serve as alternative to light wood frame walls or CLT walls. Some guidelines for the application and design of NLT shear walls and post laminated LVL shear walls were proposed.
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9 records – page 1 of 1.