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The Case for CLT Manufacturing in Maine

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2382
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Market and Adoption
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Climate Effects of Forestry and Substitution of Concrete Buildings and Fossil Energy

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2774
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Gustavsson, L.
Nguyen, T.
Sathre, Roger
Tettey, U.Y.A.
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Climate Change
Modular Construction
Carbon Emissions
Forest Management
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews
Summary
Forests can help mitigate climate change in different ways, such as by storing carbon in forest ecosystems, and by producing a renewable supply of material and energy products. We analyse the climate implications of different scenarios for forestry, bioenergy and wood construction. We consider three main forestry scenarios for Kronoberg County in Sweden, over a 201-year period. The Business-as-usual scenario mirrors today's forestry while in the Production scenario the forest productivity is increased by 40% through more intensive forestry. In the Set-aside scenario 50% of forest land is set-aside for conservation. The Production scenario results in less net carbon dioxide emissions and cumulative radiative forcing compared to the other scenarios, after an initial period of 30–35 years during which the Set-aside scenario has less emissions. In the end of the analysed period, the Production scenario yields strong emission reductions, about ten times greater than the initial reduction in the Set-aside scenario. Also, the Set-aside scenario has higher emissions than Business-as-usual after about 80 years. Increasing the harvest level of slash and stumps results in climate benefits, due to replacement of more fossil fuel. Greatest emission reduction is achieved when biomass replaces coal, and when modular timber buildings are used. In the long run, active forestry with high harvest and efficient utilisation of biomass for replacement of carbon-intensive non-wood products and fuels provides significant climate mitigation, in contrast to setting aside forest land to store more carbon in the forest and reduce the harvest of biomass.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Forest Management, Market and Climate Impacts of Mass Timber Materials

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2341
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Organization
The Nature Conservancy
Country of Publication
United States
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
LCA
Life Cycle Analysis
Forest Management
Climate Impacts
Research Status
In Progress
Summary
The Nature Conservancy is leading a multi-institution collaboration to quantify the potential for innovative mass timber materials to support improved forest management, revitalize forest economies and mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. Life cycle assessments (LCAs) of engineered timber products such as glued laminated timber (glulam) and cross-laminated timber (CLT) in construction have highlighted their environmental advantages over conventional materials such as concrete and steel. However, there is little understanding of how developing new markets for such materials could support the wood product sector and the management of US forests. This applied research will assess in detail the potential impacts of large-scale growth in mass timber demand on wood product markets, timber harvest, forest management and climate change mitigation in key wood-producing regions across the USA and globally, as well as opportunities to leverage these markets to support US forest management and rural economies. The findings will be used to produce peer-reviewed publications and design a suite of targeted stakeholder engagement materials and programs, providing an objective, credible fact base to inform the design of policies and programs to maximize environmental and economic benefits of mass timber use for the forest sector.
Resource Link
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