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21 records – page 1 of 3.

Compartment Fire Testing of a Two-Story Mass Timber Building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1825
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Fire
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Zelinka, Samuel
Hasburgh, Laura
Bourne, Keith
Tucholski, David
Ouellette, Jason
Organization
Forest Products Laboratory
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Report
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Tall Wood
Gypsum
Mass Timber
Fire Performance
Compartment Fire Test
Sprinklers
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Five full-scale fire experiments were conducted to observe the performance of a two-level apartment-style structure constructed of mass timber. Each level consisted of a one bedroom apartment, an L-shaped corridor, and a stairwell connecting the two levels. One of the primary variables considered in this test series was the amount and location of exposed mass timber. The amount of mass timber surface area protected by gypsum wallboard ranged from 100% to no protection. For each experiment, the fuel load was identical and the fire was initiated in a base cabinet in the kitchen. In the first three experiments, the fire reached flashover conditions, and subsequently underwent a cooling phase as the fuel load from combustible contents was consumed. The first three experiments were carried out for a duration of up to 4 h. In the fourth experiment, automatic fire sprinklers were installed. Sprinklers suppressed the fire automatically. In the fifth experiment, the activation of the automatic fire sprinklers was delayed by approximately 20 minutes beyond the sprinkler activation time in the fourth experiment to simulate responding fire service charging a failed sprinkler water system. A variety of instrumentation was used during the experiments, including thermocouples, bidirectional probes, optical density meters, heat flux transducers, directional flame thermometers, gas analyzers, a fire products collector, and residential smoke alarms. In addition, the experiments were documented with digital still photography, video cameras, and a thermal imaging camera. The experiments were conducted in the large burn room of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives Fire Research Laboratory located in Beltsville, Maryland, USA. This report provides details on how each experiment was set up, how the experiments were conducted, and the instrumentation used to collect the data. A brief summary of the test results is also included. Detailed results and full data for each test are included in separate appendices.
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Considerations for Detailing the Closure Penetration and Gypsum Fire Separation Wall Interface

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2755
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Fire
Material
Other Materials
Application
Walls
Author
Lum, Conroy
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2015
Format
Report
Material
Other Materials
Application
Walls
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Gypsum
Fire Separation Walls
Fire Doors
Closure Penetration
Fire Performance
Fire Test
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Vertical gypsum fire separation walls that have fire-resistive ratings evaluated in accordance with a recognized standard are permitted for use in building construction. When approved doors are inserted in such walls, the details must be presented for consideration as an “alternative solution”. This guide is based on observations of two CAN/ULC S101 (ULC, 2007) tests on gypsum fire separation walls with S104 (ULC, 2010) approved closure penetrations. The guidance is intended to direct the designer’s attention to potential issues that might impact the performance of a closure penetration in a gypsum separation wall that use a thick wood-based sheathing (i.e. combustible) for carrying the weight of the fire door assembly. General guidance is provided on sizing the sheathing and the need for protecting the sheathing from fire, yet permitting the assembly to accommodate building movements in-service. The purpose of this guide is to recommend considerations when designing the interface between a fire door (closure penetration) in proprietary gypsum separation walls. These considerations form only part of the alternative solution that will need to be presented to the AHJ for approval. Although details are provided in Appendix VI to illustrate a possible solution, it is the responsibility of the designer to understand how the design is expected to perform. The guide discusses three scenarios to assist the designer in formulating an appropriate solution. These are performance under an extreme fire; performance under a limited fire; and performance under normal (non-fire) service conditions that may include high wind or high seismic event.
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Free
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Cross-Laminated Timber—North American CLT vs. Imported Product

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3088
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
General Information
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Organization
APA
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Document
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
General Information
Keywords
Design Property Compatibility
Adhesive Heat Durability
Moisture Durability
Fire Performance
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) manufactured in North America must meet stringent product standards and be certified to the ANSI/APA PRG 320 Standard for Performance-Rated Cross-Laminated Timber. This publication from APA - The Engineered Wood Association explains the key characteristics that are evaluated in certification process. When comparing North Amarican CLT to products manufactured elsewhere, it is important to recognize that products manufactured outside of North Amarica may not meet the performance expections defined in the ANSI standard.
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Free
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Demonstration of Fire Performance of Durable Wood Strand Mass Timber Panels

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2573
Topic
Fire
Material
Other Materials
Organization
Washington State University
University of Minnesota Duluth
Material
Other Materials
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Wood Strand Mass Timber Panel
Thermal Modification
Fire Performance
ASTM E119 test standard
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Vikram Yadama at Washington State University
Summary
Lumber yields from small diameter timber (SDT), such as ponderosa and lodge pole pine and grand fir, proposed in this study, are significantly lower (
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Development of Southern Pine Cross-Laminated Timber for Building Code Acceptance

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue474
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Fire
Mechanical Properties
Market and Adoption
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Hindman, Daniel
Bouldin, John
Year of Publication
2014
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Fire
Mechanical Properties
Market and Adoption
Keywords
Southern Pine
Fire Performance
Acoustical Performance
International Building Code
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
The current interest and growth of cross laminated timber (CLT) products has spurred interest in the manufacture of CLTs in the United States. The purpose of this paper is to explore the development of CLT materials from southern pine lumber commonly available in Virginia. A 5-layer CLT panel has been constructed using No. 2 southern pine lumber. Evaluation of mechanical properties, fire performance and acoustical performance were conducted. Results of these evaluations can guide the development and acceptance of CLT products in the International Building Code.
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Effect of Adhesives and Ply Configuration on the Fire Performance of Southern Pine Cross-Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1682
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Hasburgh, Laura
Bourne, Keith
Peralta, Perry
Mitchell, Phil
Schiff, Scott
Pang, Weichiang
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Connections
Fire
Keywords
Southern Pine
Adhesives
Ply Configuration
Fire Performance
Melamine Formaldehyde
Phenol-Resorcinol Formaldehyde
Polyurethane
Emulsion Polymer Isocyanate
Delamination
Char Rate
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 4031-4038
Summary
Thirteen Southern pine cross-laminated timber panels were tested in the intermediate scale horizontal furnace at the Forest Products Laboratory to determine the effects different adhesives and ply configuration had on fire performance. Four different adhesives were tested: melamine formaldehyde (MF), phenol resorcinol formaldehyde (PRF), polyurethane reactive (PUR), and emulsion polymer isocyanate (EPI). There were two ply configurations: Long-Cross-Long (LCL) or Long-Long-Cross (LLC) where “long” indicates the wood was parallel to the longer edge of the panel. The MF and the PRF prevented delamination and associated problems while the LLC configuration resulted in uneven charring patterns.
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Elevated Temperature Effects on the Shear Performance of a Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) Wall-to-Floor Bracket Connection

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2106
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Fire
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Author
Mahr, Kolton
Organization
Oregon State University
Year of Publication
2019
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Topic
Fire
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Fire Performance
Cyclic Shear Tests
Wall-to-Floor
Brackets
Thermal Degradation
Strength
Elastic Stiffness
Model
Temperature
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Connections in mass timber structural systems dissipate energy and transfer lateral forces from mass timber elements such as shear walls and diaphragms, providing critical load paths. Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is a prominent mass timber material used to manufacture wall and floor assemblies. Fire performance research of CLT walls and floors has been abundant in recent years in an effort to address concerns about fires in tall wood buildings. Some fire-protected structural elements, including connections, may not be directly exposed to flames in a fire event but will experience elevated temperatures. There is limited research on elevated temperature performance of CLT connections, and consequentially a lack of full understanding of the fire performance of CLT structures. Therefore, a series of cyclic shear tests were conducted on a CLT wall-to-floor bracket connection assembly to characterize thermal degradation according to a matrix of 28 exposure duration-temperature combinations. The first study developed simple models to predict thermal degradation of two basic engineering parameters, peak strength and elastic stiffness. The second study used two different methods to develop force-displacement backbone models from the experimental hysteresis data. Results from both studies indicate significant thermal degradation of the connection performance at elevated temperatures ranging between 75 °C to 200 °C. This research is a step towards holistic evaluation of elevated temperature modeling of CLT structures.
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Free
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Fire Performance of Self-Tapping Screws in Tall Mass-Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2877
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Fire
Connections
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Author
Létourneau-Gagnon, Mathieu
Dagenais, Christian
Blanchet, Pierre
Organization
Université Laval
FPInnovations
Editor
Hwang, Cheol-Hong
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Fire
Connections
Keywords
Self-Tapping Screws
Heat Transfer
Fire Performance
Finite Element Modeling
Research Status
Complete
Series
Applied Sciences
Summary
Building elements are required to provide sufficient fire resistance based on requirements set forth in the National Building Code of Canada (NBCC). Annex B of the Canadian standard for wood engineering design (CSA O86-19) provides a design methodology to calculate the structural fire-resistance of large cross-section timber elements. However, it lacks at providing design provisions for connections. The objectives of this study are to understand the fire performance of modern mass timber fasteners such as self-tapping screws, namely to evaluate their thermo-mechanical behavior and to predict their structural fire-resistance for standard fire exposure up to two hours, as would be required for tall buildings in Canada. The results present the great fire performance of using self-tapping screws under a long time exposure on connections in mass timber construction. The smaller heated area of the exposed surface has limited thermal conduction along the fastener’s shanks and maintained their temperature profiles relatively low for two hours of exposure. Based on the heat-affected area, the study presents new design principles to determine the residual length of penetration that would provide adequate load-capacity of the fastener under fire conditions. It also allows determining safe fire-resistance values for unprotected fasteners in mass timber construction exposed up to two hours of standard fire exposure.
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Fire Performance Requirements of Non-Load-Bearing Wood-Frame In-Fill Walls in Concrete/Steel Hybrid Buildings. Part 2 - Review of the National Building Code of Canada

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2622
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Fire
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Lu, Ling
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2013
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Non-Loadbearing
Fire Resistance
Concrete
Steel
Building Code
Fire Performance
Exterior Wall
Sprinklers
Mid-Rise
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This project evaluates the National Building Codes of Canada (NBCC) clauses relevant to fire performance and performance requirements of non-load-bearing wood-frame in-fill walls in concrete/steel hybrid buildings. Related clauses in NBCC are reviewed regarding the use of wood components and non-load bearing wall systems in non-combustible buildings. The highlights of this review are: § An exterior non-loadbearing wall assembly with combustible components is allowed in non-combustible construction if: a) Building height is not more than 3 storeys or has a sprinkler system throughout ; b) The interior surfaces of the wall assembly are protected by a thermal barrier ; and c) The wall assembly satisfied the testing criteria for CAN/ULC S134 ; § Combustible interior wall finishes, other than foamed plastics, are allowed in non-combustible construction if the thickness is not greater than 25 mm and their flame spread rating (FSR) is not more than 150 ; § Combustible insulation, other than foamed plastics, is allowed in non-combustible construction if the flame-spread rating not more than 25 ; § Combustible insulation with a FSR not less than 25 and not more than 500 is allowed in exterior and interior walls of non-combustible construction if the building is non-sprinklered and not more than 18 m or sprinklered and protected by a thermal barrier ; § There are no obstacles for using wood-frame in-fill wall systems for interior partition walls in hybrid buildings: a) For non-sprinklered buildings not greater than 3 storeys or a floor area not greater than 600 m2 ; b) For sprinklered buildings. § Non-combustible construction allows combustible elements in partition walls in the following instances: a) Solid lumber partitions located in a fire compartment area are permitted in a non-sprinklered floor area not greater than 600 m2 with restrictions ; b) Solid lumber partitions not less than 38 mm thick and partitions that contain wood framing are permitted with restrictions. § Combustible cladding can be used under the following circumstances: a) When a wall assembly with exposing building face is between 10 to 25% tested by CAN/ULC-S134 and complies with Article 3.1.5.5 ; b) When a wall assembly with exposing building face is between 25 to 50%, is sprinklered throughout, installed on a gypsum board sheathing, and has a FSR not more than 25 (with restrictions) ; c) When a wall assembly with exposing building face is between 50 to 100%, cladding can be combustible for group A, B, C, D, E, F. § When a building is required to be of non-combustible construction, combustible elements are limited to the requirements in Subsection 3.1.5 on non-combustible construction ; § When comparing the NBCC with the International Building Code (IBC), the IBC is more in favour of using FRT wood frame in-fill walls with one more storey.
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Fire Resistance in American Heavy Timber Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1453
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
General Information
Material
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Heitz, Jesse
Publisher
Springer, Cham
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Book/Guide
Material
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
General Information
Keywords
Historical Fire Performance
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This volume presents a history of heavy timber construction (HTC) in the United States, chronicling nearly two centuries of building history, from inception to a detailed evaluation of one of the best surviving examples of the type, with an emphasis on fire resistance. The book does not limit itself in scope to serving only as a common history. Rather, it provides critical analysis of HTC in terms of construction methods, design, technical specifications, and historical performance under fire conditions. As such, this book provides readers with a truly comprehensive understanding and exploration of heavy timber construction in the United States and its performance under fire conditions.
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Payment Required
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21 records – page 1 of 3.