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8 records – page 1 of 1.

Cross Laminated Timber Reinforced with Carbon Fibre

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2661
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Cao, Xinlei
Organization
University of Alberta
Country of Publication
Canada
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Carbon Fiber
Flexural Stiffness
Stress Distribution
Analytical Model
Finite Element Method (FEM)
Research Status
In Progress
Summary
Although engineered wood products such as glued laminated timber (glulam) and cross-laminated timber (CLT) have successfully eliminated the flaws inherently exist in conventional wood products, they are still not comparable with steel and concrete in terms of strength and stiffness. Among all different options for reinforcement, Carbon Fibre is relatively popular due to its high tensile strength, low weight, and easy installation. This study presents an analysis of flexural stiffness and stress distributions of CLT panels reinforced with carbon fibre mats, based on an analytical method and finite element method (FEM).
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Design Methods of Elements from Cross-Laminated Timber Subjected to Flexure

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue189
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Vilguts, Aivars
Serdjuks, Dmitrijs
Pakrastins, Leonids
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Netherlands
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Finite Element Method (FEM)
Static Loading Test
Stress
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Procedia Engineering
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Dynamic Response of Cross Laminated Timber Floors Subject to Internal Loads

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2716
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Skoglund, Jacob
Publisher
Lund University
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Internal Loads
Finite Element Method (FEM)
Panels
Seven-Layer Model
Modal Analysis
3D Model
2D Model
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The deregulation of timber for use in large scale constructions has seen the addition of new innovative timber-based products to a category of products referred to as engineered wood products. A now well established addition to these products is cross laminated timber, or CLT for short. CLT products use a form of orthogonal layering, where several parallel wooden boards are arranged in a number of layers, each layer being orthogonal to the previous. The use of orthogonal layering allows for increased stiffness in the two plane directions, resulting in a lightweight construction product with high load bearing capacity and stiffness. To evaluate the dynamic behaviour of structures, engineers commonly apply the finite element method, where a system of equations are solved numerically. Given a sufficient amount of computational power and time, the finite element method can help to solve most dynamical problems. For sufficiently large or complex structures the amount of resources needed may be outside the scope of possibility or feasibility for many. Therefore, evaluating the usage of certain design simplifications, such as omitting to models aspects of the geometry, or alternative forms of analysis for CLT panels may help to reduce the time and resources required for an analysis. In this Master's dissertation, a seven-layer CLT-panel has been created. In the model, each individual board and the gaps between the boards are modelled. The seven-layer model is used as a reference to evaluate the possibility of using less detailed alternative models. The alternative models are created as a layered 3D model and a composite 2D model, both models omit the modelling of the individual laminations, resulting in the layers being solid. The results show small errors for the alternative models when using modal analysis. Concluding that the modal behaviour and dynamic response of a CLT panel can be evaluated using a composite 2D model or a less-detailed layered 3D model. This significantly reduces the amount of time and computational power needed for an analysis, and clearly indicates the benefit of using alternative less detailed models.
Online Access
Free
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Evaluation and Optimization of the Vibration Behavior of CLT-Concrete Floors

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2673
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Organization
Université Laval
Country of Publication
Canada
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Finite Element Method (FEM)
Vibration Performance
Creep
Displacement
Natural Frequency
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Sylvain Ménard at Université Laval
Summary
Designers of large buildings generally want floor systems with large spans (9 m). These floors are often sized by the requirement of vibratory performance and, correlatively, deflection. The composite wood-concrete floors allow large spans with reduced static height. They are a promising alternative to simple concrete slabs. Objective 1 - Determine the evolution of the natural frequency of the CLT-concrete composite floor as a function of the stiffness of the connector, and correlate the experimental results with the model by the finite element method. Objective 2 - Parametric study of the vibration performance of the CLT-concrete composite floor. The impact of several parameters on the dynamic performance of the floor will be determined, especially the characteristics of the constituent materials, connector and the creep of the floor. Objective 3 - Build the metamodels for the study of multi-objective optimization optimization of a wood-concrete composite floor solution in relation to a regional problem in Aquitaine.
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A Novel LVL- Based Internal Reinforcement for Holes in Glulam Beams

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1908
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Beams
Author
Tapia, Cristóbal
Aicher, Simon
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
Korea
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Beams
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Hybrid Build Up
Parametric Study
Finite Element Method (FEM)
Reinforcement
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 20-23,2018. Seoul, Republic of Korea
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Numerical Study of Cross-Laminated Timber Under Fire

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2440
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Wong, Bernice
Tee, Kong Fah
Yau, T. M.
Organization
Ramboll Fire
University of Greenwich
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
Russia
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Panels
Finite Element Method (FEM)
Charring Rate
Finite Element (FE) Model
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
International Seminar on Fire and Explosion Hazards
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Use of Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) in Industrial Buildings in Nordic Climate — A Case Study

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2352
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Energy Performance
Cost
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Vibrations in Cross-Laminated Timber Floors: Examining Standards

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2726
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Svensson, Lisette
Berghem, Emma
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Vibration
FEM
Finite Element Method (FEM)
Eurocode 5
Calculatis
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The report aims to investigate norms, standards, guidelines and experience within the industry for how to design CLT (cross-laminated timber) regarding vibrations induced from humans. The following is being researched, ISO137, KL-trähandboken, Eurocode 5 and a new unpublished working draft of Eurocode 5 final working draft, Canadian CLT handbook and Cross-laminated timber structural design according to Eurocode from Austria.The conclusion is that the literature for CLT is non-existent in the current Eurocode 5 which only addresses timber floors with joists, however the new Eurocode draft suggests an update to include CLT which is similar to the norm CLT from Austria.The report contains a calculation part in which an analysis is conducted for a real project with calculations based on Eurocode 5 and the Eurocode 5 final working draft, the design tool Calculatis and FEM program RFEM. The calculations are compiled and evaluated.The calculation results show differences between the different standards. The natural frequencies are typically the same. The biggest difference is between the accelerations which is in direct relation to the modal mass, and the modal mass differs a lot between the calculations. It is understandable how Eurocode 5 final draft and RFEM calculate the modal mass, but not so for Calculatis as it doesn’t show any calculations in the technical documentation.There is a difference of the modal mass between Eurocode 5 final draft and RFEM, likely because EK5 calculate the modal mass for a rectangular floor simply supported at two or four sides. Whereas the RFEM model is not strictly rectangular nor is it simply supported everywhere, instead there are beams in some places. This suggests that caution should be regarded in calculations where floor structures have been simplified.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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8 records – page 1 of 1.