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Elevated Temperature Effects on the Shear Performance of a Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) Wall-to-Floor Bracket Connection

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2106
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Fire
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors

In-Plane Stiffness of CLT Panels With and Without Openings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1668
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Shahnewaz, Md
Tannert, Thomas
Alam, Shahria
Popovski, Marjan
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
In-Plane Loading
Finite Element Analysis
Elastic Stiffness
Openings
Thickness
Aspect Ratios
Analytical Model
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 3813-3820
Summary
The research presented in this paper analysed the stiffness of Cross-Laminated-Timber (CLT) panels under in-plane loading. Finite element analysis (FEA) of CLT walls was conducted. The wood lamellas were modelled as an orthotropic elastic material, while the glue-line between lamellas were modelled using non-linear contact elements. The FEA was verified with test results of CLT panels under in-plane loading and proved sufficiently accurate in predicting the elastic stiffness of the CLT panels. A parametric study was performed to evaluate the change in stiffness of CLT walls with and without openings. The variables for the parametric study were the wall thickness, the aspect ratios of the walls, the size and shape of the openings, and the aspect ratios of the openings. Based on the results, an analytical model was proposed to calculate the in-plane stiffness of CLT walls with openings more accurately than previously available models from the literature.
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Performance of Timber-Concrete Composite Floors Using Flat-Plate Engineered Wood Products

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1618
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Floors
Author
Gerber, Adam
Popovski, Marjan
Tannert, Thomas
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Strength
Stiffness
Small Scale
Shear Tests
Elastic Stiffness
Quasi-Static
Loading
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 2397-2406
Summary
Timber-Concrete Composite (TCC) systems are comprised of a timber element connected to a concrete slab through a mechanical shear connection. A large number of T-beam configurations currently exist; however, the growing availability of panel-type engineered wood products (EWPs) in North America in combination with a concrete topping has offered designers and engineers greater versatility in terms of architectural expression and structural and building physics performance. The focus of this investigation was to experimentally determine the properties for a range of TCC systems in several EWPs. Strength and stiffness properties were determined for different TCC configurations based on small-scale shear tests. Eighteen floor panels were tested for elastic stiffness under a quasi-static loading protocol and measurements of the dynamic properties were obtained prior to loading to failure. The tests confirmed that calculations according to the -method can predict the basic stiffness and dynamic properties of TCC floors within a reasonable degree of accuracy. Floor capacities were more difficult to predict, however, failure occurred at loads that were between four and ten times serviceability requirements. The research demonstrated that all selected connector configurations produced efficient timber-concrete-composite systems.
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Free
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Simple Cross-Laminated Timber Shear Connections with Spatially Arranged Screws

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1716
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Loss, Cristiano
Hossain, Afrin
Tannert, Thomas
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
Netherlands
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Keywords
Self-Tapping Screws
Butt-Joint
Quasi-Static
Monotonic Loading
Reverse Cyclic Loading
Yield Load
Load Carrying Capacity
Slips
Elastic Stiffness
Ductility
Energy Dissipation
Strength
Angle
Model
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Engineering Structures
Summary
This paper presents an experimental study to evaluate the use of spatially arranged self-tapping screws (STS) as shear connections for cross-laminated timber panels. Specifically, simple butt joints combined with crossed STS with different inclinations were investigated under quasi-static monotonic and reversed-cyclic loadings. The influence of the number and angle of insertion of screws, screws characteristics, friction and loading on the joint performance was explored. The yield load, load-carrying capacity and related slips, elastic stiffness, and ductility were evaluated considering two groups of tests performed on a total of 63 specimens of different size. Performance of connections with respect to the energy dissipation and loss of strength under cyclic loads was also investigated. It was shown that the spatial insertion angle of screws plays a key role in the performance of joints, not only because it relates to the shank to grain angle, but also because it affects the amount of wood involved in the bearing mechanism. Design models of STS connections are presented and discussed, and the test results are compared against analytical predictions. While good agreement for load-carrying capacity was obtained, the existing stiffness model seems less adequate with a consistent overestimation.
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