Skip header and navigation

3 records – page 1 of 1.

Advanced Wood Product Manufacturing Study for Cross-Laminated Timber Acceleration in Oregon & SW Washington, 2017

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue715
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Market and Adoption
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Organization
Oregon BEST
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Market and Adoption
Keywords
Market
US
Economic Impact
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Oregon and southwest Washington are poised as a manufacturing hub for the emerging Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) market in the United States. The region is bountiful with luscious forestland, a large percentage of which is designated as working forests. Thirty million acres of forest span across Oregon alone. As a value add product that has environmental and social co-benefits, CLT is economically competitive as a structural framing product for multi-story, even high-rise building construction: a market previously dominated by concrete and steel. The research and outreach activities performed as part of this 2015-2017 study have played a vital role in continuing the advancement of the CLT market in Oregon & SW Washington. Eager regional stakeholders see CLT and other mass timber panel products as forest products capable of providing economic benefit to communities within our region that had grown around forest product industries.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

The Economic and Emissions Benefits of Engineered Wood Products in a Low-Carbon Future

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1460
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Environmental Impact
Cost
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Winchester, Niven
Reilly, John
Organization
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Environmental Impact
Cost
Keywords
US
Construction
CO2 Emissions
Economic Impact
Economy-Wide Model
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change
Summary
There has been rapid growth in the use of engineered wood products in the construction sector in recent decades. We evaluate the economy-wide impacts of replacing carbon-intensive construction inputs, such as steel and cement, with lumber products in the US under an emissions constraint. We find that the ability to substitute lumber-based building materials increases production from the lumber and forestry sectors and decreases production from carbon-intensive sectors such as cement. Under a carbon cap-and-trade policy, the ability to substitute lumber products lowers the carbon price and the GDP cost of meeting the carbon cap, with more overall emissions abatement in the construction industry.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Potential for Tall Wood Buildings to Sequester Carbon, Support Forest Communities, and Create New Options for Forest Management

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue724
Topic
Environmental Impact
Market and Adoption
Cost
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Bergman, Richard
Kelley, Stephen
Organization
Forest Products Laboratory
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Environmental Impact
Market and Adoption
Cost
Keywords
Life Cycle Analysis
Carbon Sequestration
Financial Analysis
Life Cycle Costs
Economic Impact
Research Status
In Progress
Summary
The primary outcome of this work is to provide integrated analysis of the environmental, financial, and social benefits and costs of using CLT in tall wood buildings. Secondary outcomes will be (1) information, including a design team checkoff that can be used to inform the building community as they make decisions on specific, new building projects, and (2) an informational foundation for these stakeholders and others to begin to evaluate the complex tradeoffs between, and optimization of, environmental, financial, and social benefits and costs.
Resource Link
Less detail