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An Analytical Estimation on Seismic Performance of 3 Story Construction with "Sugi" CLT Panels Depending on Connection Properties

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue487
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Miyake, Tatsuya
Matsumoto, Kazuyuki
Tsuchimoto, Takahiro
Isoda, Hiroshi
Kawai, Naohito
Yasumura, Motoi
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Keywords
Dynamic Properties
Static Properties
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
In this paper, the relations between the load-deformation property of the CLT connections and the seismic performance of the 3 story CLT construction are analytically discussed. The static and the dynamic properties of the CLT connections led each from the static and the dynamic tests were obviously different, however the analytical results based on these properties were agree each with the results of the static and the dynamic tests proving the adequateness of estimated properties. The further study on the dynamic effects of CLT connections is necessary.
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Dynamical Properties of a Large Glulam Truss for a Tall Timber Building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2036
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Wind
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Trusses

Engineers’ Views on Serviceability in Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue858
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Serviceability
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Näslund, Ida
Organization
Luleå University of Technology
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Sweden
Format
Report
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Serviceability
Keywords
Stabilisation
Stiffness
Deformation
Serviceability Limit State
Mid-Rise
Dynamic Properties
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Higher timber buildings are produced around the world. The interest for higher timber buildings has increased. Design in ultimate limit state is well known, but little focus has been put on serviceability limit state especially on higher timber buildings. In this report result from interviews with structural engineers/designers, timber frame suppliers, and development managers are presented. The focus has been on serviceability limit state in mid-rise timber buildings. The experience and knowledge with the respondents varies, which has given a wide perspective of the area
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Guide for Wind-Vibration Design of Wood-Frame Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue379
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Wind
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Hu, Lin
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2012
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Book/Guide
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Wind
Keywords
Mid-Rise
High-Rise
Dynamic Properties
Ambient Vibration Tests
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
It is not surprising to see a rapid growth in the demand for mid- to high-rise buildings. Traditionally, these types of buildings have been dominated by steel and concrete. This trend creates a great opportunity for wood to expand its traditional single and low-rise multi-family building market to the growing mid- to high-rise building market. The significance and importance of wood construction to environmental conservation and the Canadian economy has been recognized by governments, the building industry, architects, design engineers, builders and clients. It is expected that more and more tall wood frame buildings of 6- to 8-storeys (or taller) will be constructed in Canada. Before we can push for use of wood in such applications, however, several barriers to wood success in its traditional and potential market places have to be removed. Lack of knowledge of the dynamic properties of mid- to high-rise wood and hybrid wood buildings and their responses to wind, and absence of current guidelines for wind vibration design of mid- to high-rise wood and hybrid wood buildings are examples of such barriers.
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Numerical Models for Dynamic Properties of a 14 Storey Timber Building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue274
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Design and Systems
Connections
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Utne, Ingunn
Organization
Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Year of Publication
2012
Country of Publication
Norway
Format
Thesis
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Connections
Keywords
Dynamic Properties
Finite Element Model
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The world tallest timber building with height of 45 meters, is planned for Bergen, Norway. In this master thesis the dynamic properties of the case building, as proposed by Sweco and Artec, are investigated. The proposed structural concept with a glulam frame and power-storeys, have never previously been built, and it is desirable to develop and understanding of the dynamic problems concerning this building. Previous work have shown problems with acceleration levels for tall timber building, mostly due to the material properties of timber. Timber has high flexibility and strength combined with low weight. The main aim of the work have been to build a 3D-model of the case building in a finite element program, where numerical methods can be used to find the dynamic properties of the building. The wind load and acceleration levels are investigated, and found to be reasonable compared to various criterions presented. The effect of the stiffness in the connections, as well as the use of apartment modules are investigated. In addition a dynamic analysis is run, and stochastic subspace state space system identification is used to verify the model. This can later be used for verification of the actual building when finished, and will be an important method to determine the actual damping and stiffness. Based on the findings in this work, the concept is assumed feasible, possible with some changes an even better concept is achieved. It will be exciting to see how Sweco will develop the concept further in the next planning phase.
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Static and Dynamic Properties of Retrofitted Timber Beams Using Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymers

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue797
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Application
Beams
Author
Bru, David
Baeza, Francisco Javier
Varona, Francisco
García-Barba, Javier
Ivorra, Salvador
Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Netherlands
Format
Journal Article
Material
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Application
Beams
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Damping Ratio
Ductility
Natural Frequency
Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer
Pine
Reinforcement
Static Properties
Dynamic Properties
Modal Analysis
Four Point Bending Test
Bending Strength
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Materials and Structures
ISSN
1871-6873
Summary
A study on the static and dynamic properties of sawn timber beams reinforced with glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) is reported in this paper. The experimental program is focused on the behavior of unidirectional wooden slabs, and the main objective is to fulfill the service state limit upon vibrations using GFRP when an architectonical retrofitting project is necessary. Two different typologies of reinforcement were evaluated on pine wood beams: one applied the composite only on the lower side of the beams, while the other also covered half of the beams depth. For the dynamic characterization, the natural frequency, damping ratio, and dynamic elastic modulus were measured using two different techniques: experimental modal analysis upon the whole beams; and bandwidth method using smaller samples of the same material. The static characterization consisted on four point bending tests, where elastic modulus, bending strength and ductility were assessed. The lower composite had better ductility and bending strength. On the other hand, the U-shaped laminate showed higher stiffness but also at a higher material cost. However, it allowed some ductility, i.e. compressive plasticity, even in the presence of hidden knots. Both dynamic techniques gave similar results and were capable of measuring the structure stiffness, even if short samples were used. Finally, the changes on dynamic properties because of the GFRP did not jeopardize the dynamic performance of the reinforced timber beams.
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Tall Timber Buildings—A Preliminary Study of Wind-Induced Vibrations of a 22-Storey Building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2356
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Wind
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Johansson, Marie
Linderholt, Andreas
Jarnerö, Kirsi
Landel, Pierre
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Wind
Keywords
Deflection
Dynamic Properties
Stabilisation
Sway
Wind Loads
Tall Timber
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Summary
During the last years the interest in multi-storey timber buildings has increased and several medium-to high-rise buildings with light-weight timber structures have been designed and built. Examples of such are the 8-storey building “Limnologen” in Växjö, Sweden, the 9-storey “Stadthouse” in London, UK and the 14-storey building “Treet” in Bergen, Norway. The structures are all light-weight and flexible timber structures which raise questions regarding wind induced vibrations. This paper will present a finite element-model of a 22 storey building with a glulam-CLT structure. The model will be used to study the effect of different structural properties such as damping, mass and stiffness on the peak acceleration and will be compared to the ISO 10137 vibration criteria for human comfort. The results show that it is crucial to take wind-induced vibrations into account in the design of tall timber buildings.
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Timber-Concrete Composite Connectors in Flat-Plate Engineered Wood Products

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1275
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Gerber, Adam
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Keywords
Strength
Stiffness
Shear Tests
Bending Tests
Vibration Tests
Dynamic Properties
Finite Element Model
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Timber-Concrete Composite (TCC) systems are comprised of a timber element connected to a concrete slab through a mechanical shear connection. When TCC are used as flexural elements, the concrete and timber are located in compression and tension zones, respectively. A large number of precedents for T-beam configurations exist; however, the growing availability of flat plate engineered wood products (EWPs) in North America in combination with a concrete topping has offered designers and engineers greater versatility in terms of architectural expression and structural and building physics performance. The focus of this investigation was to experimentally determine the properties for a range of proprietary, open source, and novel TCC systems in several Canadian EWPs. Strength and stiffness properties were determined for 45 different TCC configurations based on over 300 small-scale shear tests. Nine connector configurations were selected for implementation in full-scale bending and vibration tests. Eighteen floor panels were tested for elastic stiffness under a quasi-static loading protocol and measurements of the dynamic properties were obtained prior to loading to failure. The tests confirmed that both hand calculations according to the -method and more detailed FEM models can predict the basic stiffness and dynamic properties of TCC floors within a reasonable degree of accuracy; floor capacities were more difficult to predict, however, failure did usually not occur until loading reached 10 times serviceability requirements. The research demonstrated that all selected connector configurations produced efficient timber-concrete-composite systems.
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8 records – page 1 of 1.