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Duration-Of-Load and Size Effects on the Rolling Shear Strength of Cross Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue191
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
General Application

Duration-Of-Load Effect on the Rolling Shear Strength of Cross Laminated Timber: Duration-Of-Load Tests and Damage Accumulation Model

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue228
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
General Application
Author
Li, Yuan
Lam, Frank
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
General Application
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Duration of Load
Long-term
Mountain Pine Beetle
Rolling Shear Strength
Stiffness
Strength
Stress Distribution
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
In this study, the duration-of-load (DOL) effect on the rolling shear strength of cross laminated timber (CLT) was evaluated. A stress-based damage accumulation model is chosen to evaluate the DOL effect on the rolling shear strength of CLT. This model incorporates the established short-term rolling shear strength of material and predicts the time to failure under arbitrary loading history. The model was calibrated and verified based on the test data from low cycle trapezoidal fatigue tests (the damage accumulation tests). The long-term rolling shear behaviour of CLT can then be evaluated from this verified model. As the developed damage accumulation model is a probabilistic model, it can be incorporated into a time-reliability study. Therefore, a reliability assessment of the CLT products was performed considering short-term and snow loading cases. The reliability analysis results and factors reflecting the DOL effect on the rolling shear strength of CLT are compared and discussed. The results suggest that the DOL rolling shear strength adjustment factor for CLT is more severe than the general DOL adjustment factor for lumber; and, this difference should be considered in the introduction of CLT into the building codes for engineered wood design.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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