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14 records – page 1 of 2.

Benchmarking of the Advanced Hygrothermal Model HygIRC – Large Scale Drying Experiment of the Mid-Rise Wood Frame Assembly

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue349
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Moisture
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Maref, Wahid
Saber, Hamed
Ganapathy, Gnanamurugan
Abdulghani, Khaled
Nicholls, Mike
Organization
National Research Council of Canada
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Moisture
Keywords
Drying Rate
Full Scale
Hygrothermal
Mid-Rise
Moisture Content
Construction Phase
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Recent research in the field of assessment of hygrothermal response has focused on either laboratory experimentation or modelling, but less work has been reported in which both aspects are combined. Such type of studies can potentially offer useful information regarding the benchmarking of models and related methods to assess hygrothermal performance of wall assemblies. This report documents the experimental results of a benchmark experiment that was designed to allow benchmarking of stud drying predicted by NRC’s an advanced hygrothermal computer model called hygIRC, when subjected to nominally steady-state environmental conditions. hygIRC uses hygrothermal properties of materials derived from tests on small-scale specimens undertaken in the laboratory. The drying rates of wall assembly featuring wet studs that result from moisture accumulated during the framing stage of a 5 or 6 storey building. The drying rate of those studs was assessed in an experiment undertaken in a controlled laboratory setting. The results were subsequently used to help benchmark hygIRC reported under separate cover.
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Characteristics of the Radio-Frequency/Vacuum Drying of Heavy Timbers for Post and Beam of Korean Style Housings Part II: For Korean Red Pine Heavy Timbers with 250 × 250 mm, 300 × 300 mm in Cross Section and 300 mm in Diameter, and 3,600 mm in Length

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1508
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Moisture
Material
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Lee, Nam-Ho
Zhao, Xue-Feng
Shin, Ik-Hyun
Park, Moon-Jae
Park, Jung-Hwan
Park, Joo-Saeng
Publisher
The Korean Society of Wood Science Technology
Year of Publication
2011
Country of Publication
Korea
Format
Journal Article
Material
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Moisture
Keywords
Radio-Frequency/Vacuum Drying
Moisture Gradient
Shrinkage
Case Hardening
Surface Checks
Compressive Load
Language
Korean
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of the Korean Wood Science and Technology
Summary
This study examined the characteristics of radio-frequency/vacuum dried Korean red pine (Pinus densoflora heavy timbers with 250 × 250 mm (S), 300 × 300 mm (L) in cross section and 300 mm in diameter, and 3,600 mm in length, which were subjected to compressive loading after a kerf pretreatment. The following results were obtained : The drying time was short and the drying rate was high in spite of the large cross section of specimens. The moisture gradient inall specimens was gentle in both longitudinal and transverse directions owing to dielectric heating. The shrinkage of the width in the direction perpendicular to was 21 percent ~ 76 percent of that of the thickness of square timbers in the direction parallel to the mechanical pressure. The casehardening for all specimens was very slight because of significantly reduced ratio of the tangential to radial shrinkage of specimens and kerfing. The surface checks somewhat severely occurred although the occurrence extent of the surface checks on the kerfed specimens was slight compared withthat on the control specimen.
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Comparison of Test Methods for the Determination of Delamination in Glued Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2428
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Construction Moisture Management, Cross Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2685
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Wang, Jieying
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Book/Guide
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Moisture
Keywords
Wetting
Risk Mitigation
Drying
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) is an engineered mass timber product manufactured by laminating dimension lumber in layers with alternating orientation using structural adhesives. It is intended for use under dry service conditions and is commonly used to build floors, roofs, and walls. Because prolonged wetting of wood may cause staining, mould, excessive dimensional change (sometimes enough to fail connectors), and even result in decay and loss of strength, construction moisture is an important consideration when building with CLT. This document aims to provide technical information to help architects, engineers, and builders assess the potential for wetting of CLT during building construction and identify appropriate actions to mitigate the risk.
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Effect of Reserve Air-Drying of Korean Pine Heavy Timbers on High-Temperature and Low-Humidity Drying Characteristics

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1506
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Moisture
Material
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Author
Lee, Chang-Jin
Lee, Nam-Ho
Park, Moon-Jae
Park, Joo-Saeng
Eom, Chang-Deuk
Publisher
The Korean Society of Wood Science Technology
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Korea
Format
Journal Article
Material
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Topic
Moisture
Keywords
Moisture Content
Temperature
Humidity
Pine
Air Drying
Shrinkage
Internal Checks
Twist
Case Hardening
Language
Korean
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of the Korean Wood Science and Technology
Summary
The pre-air-drying of Korean pine before the high-temperature and low-humidity drying was shown to be effective in uniform moisture content distribution and prevention of surface check. Our results suggest that initial moisture content of the timber also plays important role in high-temperature and low-humidity drying method. The pre-air-drying also helps in the reduction of surface checks in Korean pine when compared to the Korean pine dried by only high-temperature and low-humidity. End-coating was not effective in the prevention of twist, shrinkage, case hardening and internal checks. The pre-air-drying reduces the internal tension stresses which occur during high-temperature and low-humidity drying thus decreasing case hardening and also preventing internal checks. The pre-air-drying decreases the moisture content and causes shrinkage which leads to increased twist in the Korean pine.
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Field Study of Hygrothermal Performance of Cross-Laminated Timber Wall Assemblies with Built-In Moisture

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1588
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Moisture
Serviceability
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
McClung, Victoria
Organization
Ryerson University
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Moisture
Serviceability
Keywords
Hygrothermal
Drying
Wetting
North America
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels have potential market in North America for building mid-rise structures due to their good structural and seismic performance, lightweight, and prefabricated nature. However, to ensure long-term durability, the hygrothermal performance of CLT wall assemblies needs to be evaluated in terms of drying and wetting potential before their widespread adoption in North America. A test wall was constructed with initially wetted CLT panels, and monitored over a year. The drying behaviour of the panels was analysed, and results were compared to hygrothermal simulations. It was found from the field data that no tested wall assemblies in the given climate prevented the panels from drying in enough time to prevent decay initiation. The hygrothermal simulation program is capable of predicting general trends, and can predict if a wall be safe, but tends to be overly conservative. Further refinement of the model for wood is needed.
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Gestion de l'Humidité en Construction, Bois Lamellé-Croisé

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2686
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Wang, Jieying
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Book/Guide
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Moisture
Keywords
Wetting
Risk Mitigation
Drying
Language
French
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Le bois lamellé-croisé (CLT) est un produit massif de bois d’ingénierie qui est fabriqué à partir de multiples pièces de bois de dimension assemblées en couches orthogonales avec des adhésifs structuraux. Ce produit est conçu pour des conditions de service sèches et est couramment utilisé pour construire des planchers, des toits et des murs. Comme l’humidification prolongée du bois peut causer des taches, de la moisissure, des variations dimensionnelles excessives (parfois suffisantes pour provoquer la défaillance des attaches), et même la pourriture et la perte de résistance, l’humidité est un facteur important dans la construction avec le CLT. Le présent document a pour but de fournir de l’information technique pouvant aider les architectes, les ingénieurs et les constructeurs à évaluer les risques d’humidification du CLT pendant la construction de bâtiments et à prendre les mesures appropriées pour atténuer ces risques.
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Hygrothermal Modelling Benchmark: Comparison of hygIRC Simulation Results with Full Scale Experiment Results (Report to Research Consortium for Wood and Wood-Hybrid Mid-Rise Buildings)

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1950
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Moisture
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Author
Cornick, Steven
van Reenen, David
Organization
National Research Council of Canada
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Topic
Moisture
Keywords
Hygrothermal Models
Drying Rate
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Hygrothermal Performance of Cross-Laminated Timber Wall Assemblies with Built-In Moisture: Field Measurements and Simulations

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue273
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Serviceability
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Author
McClung, Ruth
Ge, Hua
Straube, John
Wang, Jieying
Organization
Building and Environment
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Netherlands
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Serviceability
Moisture
Keywords
Drying
Hygrothermal
Moisture Content
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Building and Environment
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels have potential market in North America for building mid-rise or even taller structures due to their good structural and fire safety performance, light weight, and prefabricated nature. However, to ensure long-term durability when used in building enclosures, the hygrothermal performance of CLT wall assemblies needs to be evaluated in terms of wetting and drying potential. A test wall consisting of sixteen 0.6 m by 0.6 m CLT panels made of five different wood species (or species groups) and four different wall assemblies was constructed. The CLT panels were initially wetted with the moisture content (MC) in the surface layers approaching or exceeding 30%, and monitored for MCs and temperatures at different depths over one year in a building envelope test facility located in Waterloo, Ontario. The drying behaviour of these panels was analysed and the measured MCs over time were compared to simulation results using a commercial hygrothermal program. This field study showed that most of the CLT panels dried to below 26% within one month except for CLT walls with a low-permeance interior membrane, which indicated that none of the CLT walls would likely remain at a high MC level long enough to initiate decay under the conditions tested. The simulation results generally agree well with the field data at MCs below 26%. However, it was found that the hygrothermal simulation program tended to overestimate the MC in the centre of the panels by up to 5e10%, and simulated MCs at locations deep into the CLT panels were not as responsive to changes in ambient conditions, as the measurements indicated for assemblies with high exterior permeance.
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Monitoring Moisture Performance of Cross-Laminated Timber Building Elements during Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2102
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Site Construction Management
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

14 records – page 1 of 2.