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13 records – page 2 of 2.

Lateral Load-Resisting System Using Mass Timber Panel for High-Rise Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1221
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Seismic
Wind
Design and Systems
Material
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
Application
Shear Walls
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Chen, Zhiyong
Chui, Ying-hei
Publisher
Frontiers Media
Year of Publication
2017
Format
Journal Article
Material
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
Application
Shear Walls
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Wind
Design and Systems
Keywords
Lateral Load Resisting System
High-Rise
Dowel-Type Connections
FE model
Linear Static Analysis
Non-linear Dynamic Analysis
Timber-Steel Hybrid
Research Status
Complete
Series
Frontiers in Built Environment
Summary
As global interest in using engineered wood products in tall buildings intensifies due to the “green” credential of wood, it is expected that more tall wood buildings will be designed and constructed in the coming years. This, however, brings new challenges to the designers. One of the major challenges is how to design lateral load-resisting systems (LLRSs) with sufficient stiffness, strength, and ductility to resist strong wind and earthquakes. In this study, an LLRS using mass timber panel on a stiff podium was developed for high-rise buildings in accordance with capacity-based design principle. The LLRS comprises eight shear walls with a core in the center of the building, which was constructed with structural composite lumber and connected with dowel-type connections and wood–steel composite system. The main energy dissipating mechanism of the LLRS was detailed to be located at the panel-to-panel interface. This LLRS was implemented in the design of a hypothetical 20-storey building. A finite element (FE) model of the building was developed using general-purpose FE software, ABAQUS. The wind-induced and seismic response of the building model was investigated by performing linear static and non-linear dynamic analyses. The analysis results showed that the proposed LLRS using mass timber was suitable for high-rise buildings. This study provided a valuable insight into the structural performance of LLRS constructed with mass timber panels as a viable option to steel and concrete for high-rise buildings.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Mechanical Behavior of GFRP Dowel Connections to Cross Laminated Timber-CLT Panels

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2957
Year of Publication
2022
Topic
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Author
Almeida, Amanda
Moura, Jorge
Organization
Maringá State University
Londrina State University
Editor
Knapic, Sofia
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2022
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Topic
Connections
Keywords
GFRP
Dowel-Type Connections
Panel-to-Panel
Design Methodology
Push-Out Tests
Research Status
Complete
Series
Forests
Summary
Sustainability issues are driving the civil construction industry to adopt and study more environmentally friendly technologies as an alternative to traditional masonry/concrete construction. In this context, plantation wood especially stands out as a constituent of the cross-laminated timber (CLT) system, laminated wood glued in perpendicular layers forming a solid-wood structural panel. CLT panels are commonly connected by screws or nails, and several authors have investigated the behavior of these connections. Glass-fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) dowels have been used to connect wooden structures, and have presented excellent performance results; however, they have not yet been tested in CLT. Therefore, the objective of this study is to analyze the glass-fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP)-doweled connections between CLT panels. The specimens were submitted to monotonic shear loading, following the test protocol described in EN 26891-1991. Two configurations of adjacent five-layer panels were tested: flat-butt connections with 45° dowels (x, y, and z axes), and half-lap connections with 90° dowels. The results were evaluated according to the mechanical connection properties of strength, stiffness, and ductility ratio. The results showed higher stiffness for butt-end connections. In terms of strength, the half-lap connections were stronger than the butt-end connections.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Timber Trusses Made of European Beech LVL

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1527
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Trusses
Author
Kobel, Peter
Frangi, Andrea
Steiger, René
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Conference Paper
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Trusses
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Europe
Beech
Dowel-Type Connections
Ductile Failure
Embedment Tests
Embedment Strength
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 667-674
Summary
This paper presents an experimental and analytical investigation on the application of laminated veneer lumber (LVL) made of European beech wood (fagus sylvatica L.) in timber truss structures. Particular focus is laid on developing improved design approaches for dowel-type connections and on promoting ductile failure behaviour, as the connections in timber trusses are generally governing the performance of the whole structure. Embedment tests were carried out in order to assess the embedment strength values for beech LVL, which are necessary to design dowel-type connections. The results showed higher values for beech LVL, as compared to estimations using existing formulas from design codes. A series of tensile connection tests showed that, using cross-layered beech LVL, ductile dowel-type connections with high load-carrying capacities can be designed, given that premature brittle failures are prevented. Lastly, tests on full truss structures confirmed that the favourable behaviour of dowel-type connections in cross-layered beech LVL can be implemented in truss systems, improving the global behaviour of the whole structural element.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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13 records – page 2 of 2.